Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Claudia Romeo: You may know it by the name of capocollo,

  • coppa, capicola, gabagool --

  • dozens of names to describe one Italian delicacy:

  • a distinctive cured meat made from pork neck,

  • easy to spot thanks to its vivid red color

  • and beautiful marbling.

  • Unlike ham, the fat in pork neck makes capocollo a soft,

  • tender, and incredibly tasty cut.

  • We're in the countryside of Martina Franca, Italy,

  • and today we're going to talk about

  • one of the country's finest capocollo,

  • capocollo di Martina Franca.

  • This type of capocollo is very special

  • because it's made from pigs that feed only on acorns

  • from a local tree, fragno.

  • And it doesn't stop there.

  • The tree is also very important in the making process.

  • Let's go find out more.

  • Claudia: The piece Giuseppe works with is a big one,

  • about 3 or 4 kilos,

  • which at the end of the curing process

  • will lose about 50% of its weight.

  • The meat is then seasoned with salt, pepper,

  • and a touch of Senise chili pepper,

  • a variety of chili pepper coming

  • from the neighboring region of Basilicata

  • that adds a sweet, smoky scent to the meat.

  • The capocollo then cures for 15 days,

  • and every couple of days it is rubbed by hand

  • to ensure it absorbs all the flavors from the spices.

  • Unlike other types of capocollo

  • that would go straight to dry-curing,

  • this one is also brined for six hours.

  • But this brine is not your average water and salt --

  • it's vincotto, cooked grape must.

  • Grape must is that thick, fresh juice you get

  • when crushing grapes to make wine.

  • Its freshness also makes it high in sugar,

  • a perfect sweetener but also a drink.

  • After casing it, Giuseppe pierces the capocollo

  • to allow excess air out,

  • firmly tying a string to it

  • to be able to hang it during the curing.

  • To make sure the capocollo

  • has a perfect cylindrical shape,

  • he first wraps it with a sock

  • and then puts it through a custom-made funnel.

  • Claudia: Wow.

  • The goal now is to remove

  • all the excess liquid from the meat.

  • This drying phase will happen gradually

  • in three different temperature-controlled environments.

  • The first one is a drying room,

  • where the meat will spend seven days

  • and lose all of its liquids, like grape must and blood.

  • The second, a pre-curing room,

  • is a room with high humidity levels

  • to reintroduce some moisture into the meat.

  • Claudia: After another seven days in the pre-curing room,

  • the meat reaches the final destination

  • of its curing process, the curing room.

  • It will stay here for 150 days.

  • Claudia: At the end of the 150 days,

  • it's time to remove the socks

  • to finally reveal the capocollo hiding inside.

  • Wow.

  • Claudia: Giuseppe tricked me when he said

  • the capocollo is calling us to taste it.

  • We still have another step to see: the smoking.

  • To better understand just how much

  • this step affects the final product,

  • we need to go back to the forest

  • that is so dear to Giuseppe.

  • While he removes all the socks,

  • his son Andrea tells me more

  • about the local oak tree, fragno.

  • [Andrea calling to pigs]

  • [pig grunting]

  • Claudia: Spreading from the Balkans to Turkey,

  • the Itria Valley is the only place in Italy

  • where you can find this type of oak.

  • The fertile soils of this hilly farmland,

  • together with the very Italian practice

  • of curing pork neck,

  • makes capocollo from Martina Franca

  • a truly unique product.

  • After breathing the crisp air of the Court of Fragni,

  • I rejoin Giuseppe in the smoking room,

  • or the "black room," as he likes to call it.

  • [meat crackling]

  • Wow.

  • Mm.

  • Hey, we have a new project

  • that we're really excited to show you.

  • Here's the trailer.

  • Herrine Ro: So, what are you gonna show us today?

  • Daniel Boulud: Well, I love wine.

  • This is a Japanese knife.

  • Herrine: What do you use this for at the restaurant?

  • Daniel: We use it for, of course,

  • meat, steaks, ducks, roast.

  • It move and cut, and cut, and cut.

  • It's indestructible!

  • C'est bon?

  • Herrine: Yeah, it's great.

  • If you like the look of that,

  • subscribe to Food Insider

  • and tune in tomorrow to watch the full episode.

Claudia Romeo: You may know it by the name of capocollo,

字幕と単語

ワンタップで英和辞典検索 単語をクリックすると、意味が表示されます

B1 中級

How Capocollo (Gabagool) Is Made In Italy | Regional Eats

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2022 年 03 月 27 日
動画の中の単語