Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • how do we think about self driving cars?

    自動運転車をどう考えるか?

  • The technology is essentially here and we now have to take a technology in which machines can make a bunch of quick decisions, oftentimes quicker than we can.

    技術は基本的にここにありますが、私たちは、機械が多くの迅速な決断を下すことができる技術を受け取らなければなりません。

  • Ah, that could drastically reduce traffic fatalities, could drastically improve the efficiency of our transportation grid, helped solve things like carbon emissions that are causing, causing the warming of the planet.

    交通事故による死亡者数を大幅に減らし、交通網の効率を大幅に改善し、地球温暖化の原因となっている二酸化炭素の排出を解決することができます。

  • But Joey made a very elegant and simple point, which is what are the values that we're going to embed in the cars, if in fact we're going to get all the benefits of self driving cars and how do we make the public comfortable with it?

    しかし、ジョーイは非常にエレガントでシンプルな指摘をしています。それは、もし実際に自動運転車のメリットをすべて得ようとするならば、車に埋め込むべき価値とは何か、そして、一般の人々にそれを納得してもらうにはどうしたらよいか、ということです。

  • Now, some of it's just right now, the overriding concern of the public is safety.

    今のところ、一般の人々の最大の関心事は安全性だということもあります。

  • Alright.

    よし。

  • The notion of essentially taking your hands off the wheel, but as Joey pointed out, they're going to be a bunch of choices that you have to make a classic problem being if the cars are driving and you can swerve to avoid a pedestrian who maybe wasn't paying attention, it's not your fault.

    車から手を離すという概念ですが、ジョーイが指摘したように、多くの選択を迫られることになります。典型的な問題は、車が運転していて、注意していなかった歩行者を避けるためにハンドルを切っても、自分のせいではないということです。

  • But if you swerve, you're going to go into a wall and might kill yourself.

    でも、ハンドルを切ったら壁にぶつかって、自殺してしまうかもしれない。

  • And how do you make the calculations about odds and airbags and speed and all that, that you can have that machine make that decision?

    また、確率やエアバッグ、速度など、機械に判断させるための計算はどのようにして行うのでしょうか?

  • Uh but that's a moral decision, not just a pure utilitarian decision.

    しかし、それは純粋な功利主義的な判断ではなく、道徳的な判断です。

  • And who's setting up those rules?

    そのルールを誰が決めているのか?

  • Do we have broad consensus around what those rules are?

    そのルールについては、幅広いコンセンサスが得られているのでしょうか。

  • That's going to be important?

    それが重要になってくるのか?

  • We're going to have the same set of questions when it comes to medicine.

    医療に関しても同じような疑問を持つことになります。

  • Um We have invested heavily in thinking about precision medicine or individualized medicine, thinking about how the combination of the human genome and uh, yep, computer data and a large enough sample size can potentially arrive at a whole host of cures.

    私たちは、プレシジョン・メディシン(精密医療)や個別化医療について考えることに重点的に投資してきました。ヒトゲノムと、コンピュータ・データと、十分なサンプルサイズを組み合わせることで、多くの治療法を導き出せる可能性があると考えています。

  • Parkinson's Alzheimer's cancer.

    パーキンソン病 アルツハイマー病 癌

  • There are a whole bunch of interesting choices that we're going to have to make as we proceed in this, because the better we get at it, the more predictive we are about certain genetic variations having an impact.

    これを進めていくと、興味深い選択がたくさん出てきます。というのも、研究が進めば進むほど、特定の遺伝子変異が影響を与えることが予測できるようになるからです。

  • How we think about insurance, how we think about medical pricing, who gets what, when, how is that something that we're going to hand out over to an algorithm and if so, who is writing it?

    保険をどう考えるか、医療費をどう考えるか、誰がいつ何を手に入れるのか、それをどうアルゴリズムに委ねるのか、もしそうなら誰がそれを書くのか。

  • So, so these are going to be unavoidable questions.

    ですから、これらは避けて通れない質問になるでしょう。

  • And I think that Joy is exactly right, making sure that the broad public that's not necessarily going to be following every single iteration of this debate still feels as if their voices heard, they're represented.

    ジョイはまさにその通りで、必ずしもこの議論のすべての繰り返しを見ているわけではない一般の人々にも、自分たちの声が届いている、代表されていると感じてもらえるようにしているのです。

  • The people in the room are mindful of a range of equities that's going to be really important.

    この部屋にいる人たちは、本当に重要になってくる株式の範囲を心に留めています。

  • And what is the role of government in that context, as we start to get into these ethical questions?

    そして、このような倫理的な問題に直面し始めたとき、政府の役割とは何でしょうか?

  • Well, my instinct is initially the role is a convener course.

    私の直感では、最初はコンビーナーコースの役割だと思います。

  • The way I've been thinking about the regulatory structure as a I emerges is that early in a technology 1000 flowers should bloom and the government should have a relatively light touch investing heavily in research, making sure that there is a conversation between basic research and applied research and companies that are trying to figure out how to apply it.

    私が考えてきたのは、技術が誕生して間もない時期には花が咲き乱れ、政府は比較的軽いタッチで研究に多大な投資を行い、基礎研究と応用研究、そしてそれをどう応用するかを考えている企業との間に会話が成立するようにすることです。

  • A good example of where this has worked pretty well, I think is in predicting the weather.

    これがうまく機能した例としては、天気予報が挙げられると思います。

  • Got big data, really complex systems.

    ビッグデータや複雑なシステムがある。

  • Government basically said, hey, we got all this data and suddenly a whole bunch of folks are gathering around working with the National Weather Center and developing new apps.

    政府は基本的に、これらのデータを手に入れたことで、大勢の人々が集まってきて、ナショナル・ウェザー・センターと協力したり、新しいアプリを開発したりするようになりました。

  • And we've actually been able to predict an oncoming tornado 34 times faster than it used to be.

    そして実際に、迫り来る竜巻を34倍の速さで予測できるようになったのです。

  • That saves lives.

    それが命を救うのです。

  • That's a that's a good example of where the government isn't doing all the work initially.

    これは、政府が最初からすべての仕事をしているわけではないということを示す良い例だと思います。

  • But his inviting others to participate as technologies emerge and mature than figuring out how they get incorporated into existing regulatory structures becomes a tougher problem.

    しかし、技術が生まれ、成熟していく中で、他の人に参加してもらうことは、既存の規制構造にどのように組み込んでいくかを考えるよりも難しい問題です。

  • And the government needs to be involved a little bit more.

    そして、政府はもう少し関与する必要がある。

  • Not always to force the new technology into the square peg that exists, but maybe to change the peg.

    常に新しい技術を既存の四角いペグに押し込むのではなく、ペグを変えることができるかもしれません。

  • And one of the things that we're trying to do, for example, is to get the Federal Drug Administration the FDA to redesign how it's thinking about genetic medicine.

    例えば、私たちが試みていることのひとつに、連邦医薬品局(FDA)に、遺伝子治療についての考え方を再構築してもらうことがあります。

  • When a lot of it's rules regulations were designed for a time when, you know, it was worried about heart stent, uh, is a very different problem.

    その規則の多くは、心臓のステントを心配していた時代のために作られたものですが、これは非常に異なる問題です。

  • So, basic research from government convening to make sure the conversations are happening, ensuring transparency.

    そのため、政府の基礎研究は、会話が行われているかどうかを確認するために招集され、透明性を確保します。

  • But as things mature, making sure that uh, there is a transition and a seamless way to get the technology to rethink regulations.

    しかし、物事が成熟するにつれ、規制を見直すための技術を得るための移行とシームレスな方法を確認します。

  • And as Joey pointed out, making sure that the regulations themselves reflect a broad base set of values because otherwise, if it's not transparent, we may find that it's disadvantaging certain people, certain groups or that the public is just suspicious of it.

    また、ジョーイが指摘したように、規制自体が幅広い価値観を反映したものであることを確認することも重要です。そうでない場合、透明性がなければ、特定の人々や特定のグループに不利益をもたらしたり、一般の人々が疑念を抱いたりする可能性があります。

  • I can say one thing about that.

    一つだけ言えることがあります。

  • So there's it ties to two things.

    つまり、それは2つのことに結びつくのです。

  • So one is when we did the this car trolley problem, I think we found that most people like the idea that the driver or the passenger could be sacrificed to save many people, but they would never buy that car.

    1つは、この車のトロッコ問題をやったときに、多くの人が、運転手や乗客が犠牲になって多くの人を救うことができるという考えには賛成だが、その車を買うことはないということがわかったと思います。

  • And that was that was sort of short version of the result.

    そして、それが結果のショートバージョンのようなものだった。

  • The other related thing, which is, I don't know if you've heard the neuro diversity movement, but this is a this, if we solve autism, let's say.

    もう一つ関連しているのは、ニューロ・ダイバーシティ運動というのを聞いたことがあるかどうかわかりませんが、これは、自閉症を解決したら、としましょう。

  • And Temple Grandin talks about this a lot.

    テンプル・グランディンはこのことをよく話しています。

  • She says that, you know, Mozart and Einstein and Tesla would all be considered autistic if they're here today.

    彼女が言うには、モーツァルトもアインシュタインもテスラも、今ここにいたらみんな自閉症だと思われるだろうと。

  • I don't know if that's true, but something might be honest about the spectrum.

    それが本当かどうかはわかりませんが、何かが正直にスペクトラムを語っているかもしれません。

  • So if we were able to eliminate autism, um, and make everyone, you're a normal, normal, I bet a whole swath of mighty kids would not be the way they are.

    もし、自閉症をなくして、みんなが普通の人になったら、きっと多くの子供たちが今のような状態にはならないでしょうね。

  • And you know, you probably wouldn't want Einstein as your kids, as somebody who was in Cambridge at the Harvard Law School.

    アインシュタインを自分の子供にしたいとは思わないでしょうし、ケンブリッジでハーバード・ロー・スクールにいた人にしたいとも思わないでしょう。

  • B, I didn't want to echo that stereotype about and and someone was therapy, but some of the brilliant kids are kind of on the spectrum.

    Bさん、私はそのようなステレオタイプを響かせたくありませんでしたし、誰かがセラピーをしていましたが、優秀な子供たちの中には、ある種のスペクトラムがあります。

  • And I think one of the things that's really important, whether we're talking about autism or just diversity broadly, one of the problems I think is that allowing the market and each individual to decide, okay, I just want a normal kid and I want a car that's going to protect me is not going to lead to a maximum for the societal benefit.

    自閉症の話であれ、多様性の話であれ、本当に重要なことの一つは、市場や各個人が、「私は普通の子供が欲しいので、私を守ってくれる車が欲しい」という判断をすることは、社会的利益の最大化にはつながらないということだと思います。

  • And I think that whether it's government or something, we can't just have this market driven.

    そして、政府にしても何にしても、この市場主導型だけではいけないと思うのです。

  • And I think a lot of these decisions are going to be this way.

    そして、多くの決断はこのようになると思います。

  • I think that's a great point.

    それは素晴らしい点だと思います。

  • And it actually goes to the larger issue, um, that we wrestle with all the time around ai oh, and science fiction taps into this all the time.

    そして、それは実際には、より大きな問題につながるのですが、私たちが常に悩んでいるのは、「AI」の周辺で、SFは常にこの問題に取り組んでいます。

  • Part of what makes us human are the kinks, they're the mutations there, the outliers there, the flaws that create art or the new invention, right?

    人間を人間たらしめているものの一部は、ねじれであり、それは突然変異であり、異常であり、芸術や新しい発明を生み出す欠陥なのです。

  • We we have to assume that if a system is perfect, then it's static and part of what makes us who we are, part of what makes us alive is that is dynamic.

    私たちは、システムが完璧であれば、それは静的なものであり、私たちを私たちたらしめているもの、私たちを生き生きとさせているものの一部は、動的なものであると考えなければなりません。

  • And we're surprised.

    と驚いています。

  • One of the challenges that will have over time is to think about where those areas where it's entirely appropriate for us just to have things work exactly the way they're supposed to without surprises.

    今後の課題のひとつは、サプライズなしに想定通りの動作をさせることが適切な領域はどこかを考えることです。

  • So airline flight might be a good example where, you know, I'm not that interested in having surprises.

    航空会社のフライトは、サプライズにはあまり興味がないという良い例かもしれませんね。

  • If I have a smooth flight every time I'm fine.

    毎回スムーズなフライトができていれば問題ありません。

  • Right?

    そうですね。

  • Yeah.

    うん。

how do we think about self driving cars?

自動運転車をどう考えるか?

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 政府 技術 ジョーイ 研究 問題 医療

自律走行車が走る世界では|バラク・オバマ×伊藤穰一|Ep7|WIRED.jp (自律走行車が走る世界では | バラク・オバマ×伊藤穰一 | Ep7 | WIRED.jp)

  • 3 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 07 月 29 日
動画の中の単語