Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • I think, you know when you're in the midst of a panic attack, the reason you're calling someone is one because you're scared.

    思うに、パニック発作の最中に誰かに電話するのは、1には怖いから。

  • You want some sort of comfort and like you might also want that distraction.

    あなたはある種の快適さを求め、また気晴らしを求めているかもしれません。

  • And sometimes you just have to as their supporters sit there and ride the wave with them.

    そして、時には彼らの支持者がそこに座って一緒に波に乗るようにしなければなりません。

  • Mhm.

    ムムム。

  • Yeah.

    うん。

  • Yeah.

    うん。

  • I was like I said really little and I was experiencing like, you know, symptoms of anxiety.

    私は先ほど言ったように本当に小さくて、不安のような症状を経験していました。

  • Not even my mom could tell me, oh, that's anxiety.

    母でさえも、「ああ、それは不安だね」とは言ってくれませんでした。

  • There's been moments for sure where like even it's me who's freaking out.

    確かに、自分自身がパニックになってしまうような瞬間もありました。

  • So I'm like, I can't do this, I can't get out of bed today.

    だから、今日はもう無理だ、ベッドから出られない、という感じです。

  • Like, like, oh my gosh, I'm, you know, having a moment.

    例えば、ああ、私はこの瞬間を待っていたんだ、とか。

  • I I don't want I can't go to work.

    I I don't want I can't go to work.

  • Like this is impossible.

    こんなことはあり得ないと。

  • She will try and support me as a mom, but then she's also my manager, so then she's like, well you have to go to work.

    彼女は母親としての私をサポートしようとしてくれますが、同時に私のマネージャーでもあるので、「あなたは仕事に行かなければならない」と言われてしまいます。

  • It can be frustrating sometimes when you're like, but I just wish you could be inside of my body to know exactly what I'm feeling right now and why I physically can't get out of bed right now.

    でも、私の体の中に入って、私が今何を感じているのか、なぜ今ベッドから出られないのかを正確に知ってほしいのです。

  • I wanted to specifically talk to you today about how to be a better ally to people in your inner circle who may suffer from anxiety.

    今日は特に、あなたの周りにいる不安を抱えている人たちの味方になる方法についてお話したいと思います。

  • Absolutely.

    絶対に。

  • Well, I think first of all, we need to recognize that anxiety is really common.

    まず第一に、不安はとても一般的なものであることを認識する必要があると思います。

  • It's sort of our body's response to something that makes us afraid.

    恐怖を感じたときの体の反応のようなものです。

  • It's a threat.

    脅威です。

  • But I think the way to help as an ally is to first recognize when someone is having what would be considered usual anxiety and when it moves into where it's problematic and it interferes with their ability to function.

    しかし、味方として支援する方法は、まず誰かが通常の不安を抱えていることを認識し、それが問題となるような状態になり、その人の機能に支障をきたすようになったら、それを認識することだと思います。

  • Like you just said, recognizing when this might be something that you guys can just kind of deal with on your own, or if it's something that might need to be taken to a more serious level, well, let's take a moment to kind of break down anxiety.

    先ほどおっしゃったように、自分たちで対処できる問題なのか、それとももっと深刻な問題なのかを認識するために、不安を解消するための時間を設けましょう。

  • You know, I'm a psychiatrist, so I think about these things very methodically.

    私は精神科医なので、このようなことをとても几帳面に考えます。

  • So let's start with the physical, A person might have an elevated heart rate or heart palpitations, shortness of breath, just a sense of, you know, my body is kind of on like supercharge your just going really rapidly.

    心拍数の上昇や動悸、息切れ、体が超高速で動いているような感覚などがあるかもしれません。

  • You might feel dizzy or lightheaded and sometimes people just feel as if they may be having a heart attack or about to have a seizure and then there are the psychological components fear that I'm going crazy, a fear that something bad is going to happen.

    めまいやふらつきを感じることもありますし、時には心臓発作や発作が起きそうな気がすることもあります。

  • And then there might be the sort of obsessive thoughts about things that have happened in the past, over generalization, overthinking, and it just gets into this kind of a track where your brain just can't get off that thinking and then that might affect behaviors.

    さらに、過去に起こったことについての強迫観念、過度の一般化、過剰な思考などがあり、脳がその思考から離れられないような状態になり、それが行動に影響を及ぼすこともあります。

  • So when anxieties around for a long time, we noticed that people start isolating, they start avoiding things they may not want to go out.

    不安な状態が長く続くと、孤立したり、外出を避けたりするようになります。

  • I know that you know, your experience in terms of like going out on the catwalk or being on an airplane, all of those things that normally we just do without thinking for the person who's had a panic attack in that situation, it takes them back there.

    キャットウォークや飛行機など、普段は何気なく行っていることが、パニック発作を起こした人にとっては、その場に戻ってしまうという経験をされたと思いますが、いかがでしょうか。

  • So hearing that those are like normal in the anxiety world to feel those things, it comforts you a little bit.

    だから、そういうことが不安の世界では当たり前のように感じられると聞いて、少し安心しました。

  • And as more people come out and talk about their mental health problems are their anxiety.

    また、自分の精神的な問題(不安)について話す人が増えてきました。

  • The more the public is aware that, hey, this is a real thing, but especially during the recent normal wasn't the right word.

    一般の人々が、「これは現実のことなんだ」と認識すればするほど、特に最近は「普通」という言葉は適切ではありませんでした。

  • Try to avoid that.

    それを避けようとする。

  • But sometimes, you know, it's just, it normalizes it.

    しかし、時には、それが普通になってしまうこともあるのです。

  • And since more people are talking about it, both on social media and in conversations, people are open about the fact that they're in treatment.

    また、SNSでも会話でも話題にする人が増えたため、治療中であることをオープンにする人が増えました。

  • Again, it's so common and so many people suffer from it, but only about maybe a third of people truly get help.

    繰り返しになりますが、この病気は非常に一般的で、多くの人が苦しんでいますが、本当に助けを求めている人は3分の1程度です。

  • You know, For me personally, I've never gotten into medication, but I'm sure, I'm sure at a certain level it's, it's necessary for some people know, well medication is a choice and people that have minor anxiety to moderate anxiety, I certainly recommend that you should try having some type of routine.

    私は個人的には薬を飲んだことはありませんが、ある程度のレベルでは薬が必要な人もいると思いますし、薬は選択の一つです。

  • There are things that you can do like meditation, going for a walk, having a nice hot bath or camomile tea, even going for a jog, sometimes getting exercise really helps.

    瞑想をしたり、散歩をしたり、熱いお風呂に入ったり、カモミールティーを飲んだり、ジョギングをしたり、時には運動をすることも効果的です。

  • But there does get to a certain point, at least in my department where we see folks who their anxiety is so crippling and they might have a more serious illness like obsessive compulsive disorder or generalized anxiety disorder where they can't function.

    しかし、少なくとも私の部署では、不安があまりにもひどく、強迫性障害や全般性不安障害などのより深刻な病気を患っていて、機能しなくなってしまっている人を見ることがあります。

  • That gets to the point where you can't get out of bed, you can't face the public or you can't go out of your house, then it might be time to talk to someone and maybe a medical doctor is one of those people.

    ベッドから起き上がれない、人前に出られない、家から出られないという状態になったら、誰かに相談した方がいいかもしれません。

  • Unfortunately every medication that a psychiatrist prescribes has both benefits and side effects.

    精神科医が処方する薬には、残念ながら効果と副作用があります。

  • And one of the unfortunate things is that some of these medications that can be habit forming.

    また、残念なことに、これらの薬の中には習慣性のあるものもあります。

  • And so it's an important conversation to have with the professional.

    だからこそ、プロとの重要な会話になるのだと思います。

  • Is this the right thing for me to do and then to do it under close supervision?

    これは私にとって正しいことなのか、そしてそれをしっかりとした監督のもとで行うことなのか。

  • Totally.

    完全に。

  • I know that you probably mentor some younger folks in the business.

    あなたは、ビジネスにおいて若い人たちを指導していると思います。

  • What things do you observe in them when they're having anxiety?

    不安を抱えているときの彼らを観察すると、どんなことが見えてきますか?

  • It's so interesting because my sister actually came to me two days ago and was talking to me about it because she was like lately I've been having shortness of breath and I've been getting tingling and numb.

    興味深いことに、2日前に妹が私のところに来て、そのことを話していました。「最近、息切れがしたり、体がしびれたりすることがある。

  • She was expressing all these feelings she had had.

    彼女は自分の持っていた感情をすべて表現していた。

  • And it's so interesting being on the other side of it and really feel like, okay, I can understand you and I can sit here and do what I would hope someone would do for me when I thought it was on that end of it.

    そして、その反対側にいることはとても興味深いことで、「よし、私はあなたを理解することができる」「私はここに座って、その反対側にいると思っていたときに誰かにしてもらいたいと思っていたことをすることができる」と本当に感じることができます。

  • Well, that's a great story.

    なるほど、すごい話ですね。

  • And when you experience someone else's anxiety through their eyes and you put it through your lens and telling them, hey, I've had this, it'll get better tell them what things you did and try to help them find their personal cure.

    他の人の目を通して、その人の不安を経験し、自分のレンズを通して、「私も経験したことがあるけど、きっと良くなるよ」と伝え、自分がしたことを伝え、その人が自分なりの治療法を見つけられるようにするのです。

  • I think that's something that's not maybe as talked about is anxiety in a workplace.

    職場での不安については、あまり語られていないことだと思います。

  • Um, whether it be, you know, a general environment that feels very hank anxious or even just if you're personally feeling it and you feel like you want to go talk to your boss about and it depends on the workplace.

    不安になるような環境であったり、個人的に不安を感じて上司に相談したいと思っていたり、職場によって様々だと思います。

  • Certainly in smaller workplaces, there isn't like a big hR human resources department to go to to get help.

    確かに小さな職場では、大きな人事部のようなものはありません。

  • But I think if you witness it in a co worker, the first thing is to let them know high.

    でも、もし同僚にそれを目撃したら、まずはその人に高らかに宣言することが大事だと思います。

  • I see something's changing.

    何かが変わってきているのがわかります。

  • We need to work as a team.

    チームとしての活動が必要なのです。

  • Here.

    ここです。

  • Is there something that I can talk with you about?

    何かお話しできることはありませんか?

  • You need to realize that you're not necessarily their therapist and if it is going to your boss, I try to have people frame it through medical condition.

    あなたは、必ずしも彼らのセラピストではないことを理解する必要があります。もし、あなたの上司に相談する場合は、医学的な条件を考慮してもらうようにしています。

  • Like I have anxiety, especially if it's something that's been diagnosed and that's ongoing.

    特に、診断を受けていて、それが継続しているものであれば、私は不安を感じます。

  • I might need to have accommodations because it is one of those illnesses that's covered under the americans with disabilities act.

    この病気は米国障害者法の対象となる病気のひとつなので、便宜を図ってもらう必要があるかもしれません。

  • So in the workplace there are certain things like giving people more time, giving people more space coming up with hybrid alternatives.

    職場では、時間を与えたり、スペースを与えたり、ハイブリッドな代替案を考えたりすることが必要です。

  • So I have some questions from our audience.

    それでは、視聴者の皆さんからの質問にお答えします。

  • The first question, how do you get older generations to understand anxiety and validate one's feelings, anxiety stretches across all generations.

    最初の質問は、どうやって年配の方に不安を理解してもらい、自分の気持ちを認めてもらうかということですが、不安はすべての世代に及びます。

  • It might manifest itself in different ways.

    それは様々な形で現れてくるかもしれません。

  • So when you start talking across generational lines, I think it's just important to try to find a common language and talking about your experience of fear, your experience of uncertainty of disappointment.

    世代を超えて話をするときには、共通の言語を見つけて、恐怖の経験や不確実性の経験、失望の経験について話すことが重要だと思います。

  • Those are things that people of all they just should be able to relate to.

    それは、どんな人にも共感してもらえるものだと思います。

  • Okay, question two.

    では、質問2です。

  • What advice can you share for maintaining friendships in which you are both mentally ill.

    精神疾患を持つ者同士の友情を保つためのアドバイスをお願いします。

  • I think it can be really helpful that you support each other and not be judgmental of each other.

    私は、あなたがお互いをサポートし、お互いを批判しないことは、本当に役に立つと思います。

  • But I think you have to be cautious that you don't try to fix each other and help that person get to the right assistance when you feel like it's beyond your ability.

    しかし、自分の能力を超えていると感じたときに、お互いに修復してその人が正しい援助を受けられるようにしようとしないように、気をつけなければならないと思います。

  • Well thank you so much.

    どうもありがとうございました。

  • I think the last thing that I would love to hear from you and something that we're doing with the professionals that come in here is just getting some tips or tricks or something that the viewers can kind of apply to their lives at home.

    最後に、ここに来るプロの方々にぜひ聞いていただきたいのは、視聴者が自宅での生活に応用できるようなヒントやコツを教えていただくことです。

  • So one technique that I like to advise people to try, it's called box breathing, okay?

    そこで、皆さんに試していただきたいのが、ボックス・ブリージングと呼ばれる手法です。

  • And it's breathing where you focus on a visual where you drop box in your mind.

    そして、頭の中にドロップボックスを入れたビジュアルに集中する呼吸です。

  • I want to give it a try.

    試してみたいと思います。

  • Okay?

    いいですか?

  • So just close your eyes and then we're gonna draw a box up as you breathe in and you inhale 1234 and then pause, draw a line across 12 and then we're going to dropbox line down 1234 paws and then draw another line 12 And then pause, draw a line up, inhale 1234 and you just kind of keep cycling through drawing those lines and boxes.

    目を閉じて、息を吸いながら上に箱を描きます 1234を吸って、一時停止して、12を横切る線を描きます それから、ドロップボックスの線を1234の前足に落として、別の線を描きます そして、一時停止して、線を上に描き、1234を吸って、これらの線や箱を描くことをただ循環させます。

  • I like that one, we'll get you to focus on the breath.

    あれはいいですね、呼吸に集中してもらいます。

  • And I also want to point out that as much as we've talked about being a good ally, being a good friend and helper, it's important to remember that when things get beyond your abilities, don't be afraid to either yourself or someone else to call for help.

    また、これまで「良き味方」「良き友人」「良き協力者」についてお話してきましたが、自分の能力を超えてしまったときには、自分自身や誰かが助けを求めることを恐れてはいけないということも忘れてはいけません。

  • You can start by finding a licensed therapist or counselor, talking to your family doctor, your primary care doctor or even going to resources online where you look for your insurance companies, provider carrier number, call them up or call a helpline to just get some assistance.

    ライセンスを持ったセラピストやカウンセラーを探したり、かかりつけの医師に相談したり、インターネットで保険会社の番号を調べて電話したり、ヘルプラインに電話したりして、サポートを受けることから始めましょう。

  • Well, thank you so much.

    それでは、ありがとうございました。

  • I really appreciate you coming and teaching me some things.

    あなたが来てくれて、いろいろと教えてくれて本当に感謝しています。

  • Well, thank you for the opportunity for doing this.

    さて、このような機会を与えてくださったことに感謝します。

  • I loved dr bonds.

    私はDr.Bondが大好きでした。

  • He is amazing.

    彼は素晴らしい。

  • I just wanted to give him a hug.

    私はただ、彼を抱きしめたかったのです。

  • I thought he was so awesome.

    彼はとてもすごい人だと思いました。

  • I thought it was really interesting that he had said how overwhelming it can be for the person who's trying to be the caretaker, for someone who's experiencing mental illness.

    私は、彼が、心の病を患っている人の世話をする人にとって、どれほどの負担になるかを語っていたことがとても興味深いと思いました。

  • And he is that And he said himself, he's like I suffer from anxiety to so at some point you have to, you know, you can help as many people as you want, but you also have to remember to check in on yourself.

    彼は、自分でも「僕は不安に悩まされている」と言っていました。ですから、ある時点で、多くの人を助けることはできても、自分自身をチェックすることを忘れてはいけません。

I think, you know when you're in the midst of a panic attack, the reason you're calling someone is one because you're scared.

思うに、パニック発作の最中に誰かに電話するのは、1には怖いから。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 不安 思い 発作 職場 描き 経験

パニック発作や不安障害を抱える大切な人を、どのように支えるべきか?ケンダル・ジェンナーとドクターが語る。|Open Minded||VOGUE JAPAN (パニック発作や不安障害を抱える大切な人を、どのように支えるべき?ケンダル・ジェンナーとドクターが語る。 | Open Minded | | VOGUE JAPAN)

  • 5 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 07 月 25 日
動画の中の単語