Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • Hello. This is 6 Minute English from BBC Learning English. I'm Neil.

    こんにちは。BBC ラーニング・イングリッシュの6ミニッツ・イングリッシュです。私はニールです。

  • And I'm Georgina.

    そして、私はジョージナです。

  • Georgina and I have got to know each other very well after working together for so long.

    ジョージナとは、長い間一緒に仕事をしてきて、お互いのことをよく知るようになりました。

  • I know what sandwiches Neil has for lunch. Egg and tomato, right, Neil?

    ニールが昼食に食べるサンドイッチを知ってるよ。卵とトマトでしょ、ニール?

  • Right! And I know it really annoys Georgina when people don't wash up their cups in the staff kitchen.

    そうですね!厨房でコップを洗わない人がいて、ジョルジナさんが困ってるんです。

  • So unhygienic!

    とても不衛生!

  • But just as important as getting to know someone, socially or at work, is getting on with people.

    しかし、人付き合いや仕事と同じくらい大切なのが、人と仲良くなることです。

  • To get on with someone is a useful phrasal verb, meaning to like someone and enjoy a friendly relationship with them.

    「To get on with someone」は、誰かを好きになる、その人と友好的な関係を楽しむという意味の便利な句動詞です。

  • Which is really important if you work with them every day!

    毎日一緒に仕事をするなら、これは本当に重要なことです。

  • And there's another word to describe the good understanding and communication between two friends: rapport.

    そして、友人同士の良好な理解やコミュニケーションを表す言葉として、もうひとつ rapport「ラポール」があります。

  • Yes, how you build rapport and get on with people has been the subject of many self-help books over the years, and is the topic of this programme.

    そう、「ラポール」の築き方、人との付き合い方は、長年多くの自己啓発本のテーマになっており、このプログラムのテーマにもなっています。

  • Well, you and I must have great rapport, Georgina, because that leads perfectly into my quiz question.

    あなたと私はとても気が合うようですね、ジョージア、なぜならクイズの答えになっているからです。

  • In 1936, American writer Dale Carnegie wrote a famous self-help book on building rapport.

    1936年、アメリカの作家デール・カーネギーは、「ラポール」の構築に関する有名な自己啓発本を書きました。

  • It sold over 30 million copies, making it one of the best-selling books of all time - but what was it called?

    3,000万部以上売れ、ベストセラーの1つになったこの本ですが、なんという本でしょうか?

  • Is it: a) How to get rich quick?, b) How to stop worrying and make friends?, or c) How to win friends and influence people?

    それは、a) 一攫千金の方法か、b) 心配事をやめて友人を作る方法か、c) 友人を獲得して人々に影響を与える方法、どれか?

  • I think I know this, Neil.

    これはわかる気がする、ニール。

  • I'm going to say, c) How to win friends and influence people.

    c) 友達を獲得し、人に影響を与える方法 だと思う。

  • OK, Georgina, we'll find out if that's right at the end of the programme.

    では、ジョージナさん、それが正しいかどうかは、番組の最後に確認しましょう。

  • When it comes to getting on with people, psychologist Emily Alison has a few ideas.

    人とうまく付き合うには、心理学者のエミリー・アリソンがいくつかのアイデアを持っています。

  • She's built a career working with the police as they build rapport with criminal suspects.

    彼女は、警察と協力して犯罪容疑者と信頼関係を築くというキャリアを積んできました。

  • Emily is the author of a new book "Rapport: the four ways to read people", and she told BBC Radio 4 programme "All In The Mind" it isn't easy to get along with everyone:

    エミリーは新刊「ラポール:人を読み解く4つの方法」の著者で、BBC ラジオ4の番組「オール・イン・ザ・マインド」で、すべての人と仲良くなるのは簡単ではないと語っています。

  • I often describe rapport-building in relationships as like walking a tightrope.

    私はよく人間関係におけるラポールの構築を、綱渡りのようなものだと表現します。

  • Because you really do need to maintain that balance of being objective, treating people with compassion,

    客観的であることと、思いやりをもって人と接することのバランスを保つことが必要だからです。

  • but that doesn't mean I'm sympathetic, I'm collusive - it's that balance between judgement and avoidance.

    でも、だからといって共感するわけでもなく、癒着するわけでもなく、判断と回避のバランスなんです。

  • Emily describes rapport building as like walking a tightrope, an idiom to describe being in a difficult situation which requires carefully considering what to do.

    エミリーさんは、ラポールづくりを「綱渡り」のようだと表現しています。これは、難しい状況に置かれ、何をすべきかを慎重に考えなければならないことを表す慣用句です。

  • Building rapport with "terrorists" or violent criminals isn't easy.

    「テロリスト」や「凶悪犯罪者」と信頼関係を築くのは簡単ではありません。

  • Emily doesn't sympathise with what they have done, but she tries to remain objective - to base her judgement on the facts, not personal feelings.

    エミリーは、彼らがしたことに同情はしないけど、個人的な感情ではなく、事実に基づいて判断する客観性を保とうとしています。

  • In her book, Emily identifies four main communication styles which she names after animals.

    エミリーは著書の中で、動物の名前にちなんで、4つの主なコミュニケーションスタイルを挙げています。

  • The best at building rapport is the friendly and cooperative monkey.

    「ラポール」を築くのに最も適しているのは、フレンドリーで協力的なサルです。

  • And there's a pair of opposites: the bossy lion, who wants to take charge and control things, and the more passive mouse.

    そして、主導権を握って物事をコントロールしたいボス的存在のライオンと、受動的なネズミという正反対の二人組がいるのです。

  • Here's Emily talking to BBC Radio 4's "All In The Mind" about the fourth animal, the T-Rex.

    BBC ラジオ4の「All In The Mind」で、4番目の動物である T-Rex について話すエミリーです。

  • Try to listen out for the communication style of this personality:

    この性格の人のコミュニケーションスタイルを聞き出すようにしましょう。

  • You've got the T-Rex which is conflict - so this is argument, whether you're approaching it from a positive position where you can be direct, frank about your message

    T-Rex は対立を意味し、これは議論であり、あなたがポジティブな立場からアプローチしているかどうか、あなたのメッセージについて率直であることができるかどうか、

  • or you approach that in a negative way by being attacking, judgmental, argumentative, sarcastic, and that actually breeds the same behaviour back.

    あるいは、攻撃的、批判的、議論的、皮肉的になることで、否定的にアプローチし、それが、実は同じような行動を生み出します。

  • So anyone who has teenagers will 100% recognise that - if you meet sarcasm with sarcasm, it's only going to go one way.

    ティーンエイジャーを持つ人なら100%わかると思いますが、皮肉に皮肉をぶつけると、一方通行にしかならないんです。

  • All four communication styles have good and bad points.

    4つのコミュニケーションスタイルには、いずれも良い点と悪い点があります。

  • On the positive side, T-Rex type people are frank - they express themselves in an open, honest way.

    一方、T-Rex タイプの人は率直で、自分を素直に表現します。

  • But T-Rex types can also be sarcastic - say the opposite of what they really mean, in order to hurt someone's feelings or criticise them in a funny way.

    しかし、T-Rex タイプは皮肉屋でもあります。誰かを傷つけるために、本心とは逆のことを言ったり、面白おかしく批判したりします。

  • Yes, sarcasm is a strange thing - like saying, "Oh, I really like your haircut", when in fact you don't!

    そう、皮肉とは不思議なもので、「ああ、あなたの髪型は本当に好きよ」と言いながら、実はそうでないようなものです。

  • Yes. There's an English saying that sarcasm is the lowest form of humour, but I think British people can be quite sarcastic at times.

    皮肉はユーモアの最低形態であるという英語のことわざがありますが、イギリス人は時にかなり皮肉を言うことがあると思います。

  • Well, I can't image you'd make many friends being rude to people.

    まあ、人に失礼なことをしていると、友達も増えないでしょうしね。

  • Maybe they should read Dale Carnegie's self-help book.

    デール・カーネギーの自己啓発本を読むべきかもしれませんね。

  • Ah yes, your quiz question, Neil. Was my answer right?

    そうだ、クイズの問題、ニール、私の答えは正しかったですか?

  • In my quiz question, I asked Georgina for the title of Dale Carnegie's best-selling self-help book about building rapport.

    クイズでは、デール・カーネギーのベストセラー「ラポールの築き方」のタイトルをジョルジナさんに尋ねました。

  • What did you say?

    なんて言ったの?

  • I said the book is called, c) How to win friends and influence people.

    私は、その本のタイトルは、c) 友人を獲得し、人々に影響を与える方法 と言いました。

  • Which is the correct answer!

    どちらが正解なのでしょうか!

  • And I guess you've read it, Georgina, because you have lots of friends.

    そして、ジョージナさんはお友達が多いので、読まれたのでしょうね。

  • I hope you're not being sarcastic, Neil!

    皮肉でないことを祈るよ、ニール!

  • Absolutely not! I'm not a sarcastic T-Rex type, more of a friendly monkey!

    絶対に違います!!私は嫌味な T-Rex タイプではなく、どちらかというとフレンドリーなサルです!

  • OK, well, let's stay friends and recap the vocabulary from this programme, starting with rapport - a good feeling between two people based on understanding and communication.

    さて、それでは、この番組で出てきた単語を復習しましょう。まず、ラポールとは、理解とコミュニケーションに基づく、2人の間の良い感じのことです。

  • If you get on with someone, you like and enjoy a friendly relationship with them.

    仲が良いということは、その人が好きで、友好的な関係を楽しんでいるということです。

  • Walking a tightrope means to be in a difficult situation which requires careful consideration of what to do.

    綱渡りとは、何をすべきか慎重に検討しなければならない困難な状況に置かれることを意味します。

  • To be objective is to base your actions on facts rather than personal feelings.

    客観的とは、個人的な感情ではなく、事実に基づいて行動することです。

  • When building rapport with someone, it's good to be frank - to express yourself in an open, honest way.

    誰かと親密な関係を築くには、率直であることが大切です。率直に自分を表現するのは良いことです。

  • But not sarcastic - to say the opposite of what you really mean, in order to hurt someone's feelings or criticise them in a humorous way.

    しかし、皮肉ではなく、相手の気持ちを傷つけたり、ユーモアを交えて批判するために、本心とは逆のことを言うことです。

  • Well, Neil, if we run over six minutes we'll break our rapport with the 6 Minute English producer, so that's all for this programme!

    さて、ニール、6分を超えると6分間英語プロデューサーとの関係が壊れてしまうので、この番組はこれでおしまいです。

  • Join us again soon for more trending topics and useful vocabulary.

    また近いうちに、トレンドのトピックや役立つ語彙をご紹介します。

  • And remember to download the BBC Learning English app and stay friends by following us on social media.

    また、BBC Learning English のアプリをダウンロードし、ソーシャルメディアで私たちをフォローすることを忘れないでください。

  • Bye for now!

    今のところバイバイ!

  • Bye!

    じゃあね!

Hello. This is 6 Minute English from BBC Learning English. I'm Neil.

こんにちは。BBC ラーニング・イングリッシュの6ミニッツ・イングリッシュです。私はニールです。

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

ワンタップで英和辞典検索 単語をクリックすると、意味が表示されます

B1 中級 日本語 エミリー ニール 友達 関係 プログラム コミュニケーション

【BBC6分英会話】人間関係をスムーズにする!ラポール(信頼関係)とは?

  • 17921 1011
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 06 月 17 日
動画の中の単語