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  • This video was made possible by CuriosityStream.

  • Get the CuriosityStream/Nebula bundle deal, currently on sale for just over a dollar a

  • month, at CuriosityStream.com/HAI.

  • Alright, so my writer wrote quite possibly the corniest, lamest, and all-around worst

  • intro I’ve ever seen for this video, so I decided to cut it, save you all from the

  • pain, and get right to it by saying the Asian Carp, as an invasive species, is really, really

  • badalmost as bad as that intro.

  • You see, back in the 1970s, a series of fishbighead carp, silver carp, grass carp, and black carpwere

  • intentionally brought to the US to eat algae in contained aquaculture facilities, and in

  • the grand American tradition of lumping several distinct groups into one big group and calling

  • them all Asian, we decided to call this set of four Asian carp.

  • Now, seeing as it was 1970 and nobody had seen Jurassic Park yet, people assumed these

  • dangerous animals would never escape and cause greater problemsbut of course, carp, uh,

  • found a way, when thanks to flooding, Asian carp were flushed out of their controlled

  • habitats and into the Mississippi River Basin.

  • Now, why are Asian carp such a threat?

  • Well, it’s because like Asian manufacturers, they outcompete the Americans.

  • To start, they eat a ton: between 5 to 20 percent of their body weight in plankton a

  • daywhich is a problem, because when they aren’t running failed restaurants, plankton

  • are usually eaten by native ciscos, bloaters, and yellow perch, which are in turn eaten

  • by lake trout and walleyes.

  • Plus, Asian carp don’t really have any effective North American natural predators, in part

  • because they grow quickly and bigly—a fully grown bighead carp can get up to 110 pounds,

  • which is the weight of a five year old, if the five year old was like, really fat.

  • Basically, Asian carp come into other fish’s native land, steal or kill off their food,

  • and force them out of their homeswhich really makes you wonder why they aren’t

  • called American carp.

  • The other reason Asian carp are a problem has less to do with native fish populations,

  • and more to do with the fact that boaters generally dislike being smacked in the face

  • by large fishwhich silver carp tend to do quite a lot, often jumping up to ten feet

  • out of the water, leaving boaters with serious injuries, and the chilling risk of having

  • a tombstone that readsslapped to death by a fish.”

  • Now, it’s far too late to save the Illinois River from these flying, feeding fiendsin

  • fact, in some areas of the river, Asian carp already make up 90% of the biomass.

  • The problem now is that the Asian carp-infested Illinois River is connected to the currently

  • Asian carp-less Lake Michigan, thanks to the catchily-named Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal,

  • which was built back in 1900 when engineers reversed the direction of the Chicago River

  • in one of America’s top five most epic mother nature pwns.

  • If Asian carp managed to get to Lake Michigan, they would threaten the lake’s $7 billion

  • fishing industry, which relies on native fish species, and its $16 billion recreational

  • boating industry, which relies on people not being smacked in the face by 60-pound carp.

  • And the carp are getting close: by 2019, there was confirmed spawning within 88 miles of

  • lake Michigan, potential spawning within 62 miles, an adult population front within 47

  • miles, and three Asian carp have been captured past the electric barrier here that’s currently

  • the primary line of defense, with the closest found only seven miles away.

  • So we need a way to keep out the carpin other words, a carpet cleaner.

  • For a while, they considered cutting off the Illinois River from Lake Michigan entirely,

  • which would re-reverse the flow of the Chicago River, but that plan was ultimately abandoned

  • because it would interrupt shipping routes.

  • But allowing ships to be able to travel down this waterway, while simultaneously blocking

  • Asian carp is a pretty difficult problem, especially when you consider that 4 out of

  • 5 dentists agree that boats are bigger than carp.

  • In the end, though, American ingenuity and bloated government spending came together

  • to plan this: an $800 million project at the Brandon Road Lock and Dam, to be completed

  • by 2027, which basically consists of building an over-engineered Saw-like Asian carp hallway

  • of doom.

  • It all starts with a flushing lock, which is designed get rid of floating larvae and

  • eggs.

  • As any big boy knows, flushing is important, but that’s especially true here, considering

  • a single female bighead carp can lay up to 1.9 million eggs a year.

  • Basically, when a boat comes to the lock, one side will open, letting in the boat, but

  • also letting in potentially carp egg-infested water.

  • But then, thanks to the power of flushing, that water will be shoved back into Illinois

  • River, lowering the water level, and the boat.

  • Then the front of the lock can close, the back can open, and boat can continue on its

  • merry way.

  • After the boat continues down an engineered channel, itll arrive at the acoustic fish

  • deterrent, which is coastal elite science talk for a series of giant underwater speakers

  • that shoot noise at fish, who apparently hate that sort of thing.

  • They carefully considered what sound would annoy the fish most, and after almost going

  • with early Wendover video voiceovers, they decided to use sounds waves at the resonant

  • frequency of Asian carp’s swim bladder, which should cause them to turn back.

  • Next is the fish taser, which the Army Corps of Engineers insists on calling an electric

  • dispersal barrier because they hate fun.

  • The fish taser is just what it sounds like: you put steel electrodes on the bottom of

  • the channel, you pulse direct current through it, and it creates an electric field that’s

  • conducted through the water, causing the fish to turn around, because as the documentary

  • Pokemon taught us, electricity is super effective against water types.

  • Finally, the Army Corps of Engineers planned one, final, terrifying, dare I say sinister,

  • defense: air bubbles.

  • Or more specifically, an air bubble curtain, which just shoots up air bubbles because apparently

  • the science smart talk fish nerds say that tends to scare away carp.

  • And if they manage to get through all of that, then I for one welcome our new carp overlords.

  • As you toil in the soon to be carp-overlord-run human mines, perhaps you can use your water-money

  • to buy the Nebula/CuriosityStream bundle.

  • As you probably know by now, Nebula is full of content from your favorite educational

  • creators, and also from me: there’s my three-part trivia show, the HAI bricks special, early

  • access to ad-free versions of regular videos, and even a new Wendover Original coming in

  • a few weeks.

  • And with the bundle, you also get access to CuriosityStream’s thousands of top-quality

  • documentaries, like their great original Engineering The Future, which is about engineering wind

  • energy, and not air bubble curtains.

  • Right now, the Nebula/CuriosityStream bundle is on sale for less than $15 for the entire

  • year, so make sure to head over to CuriosityStream.com/HAI, get the bundle deal, and help support myself

  • and tons of other independent creators.

This video was made possible by CuriosityStream.

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The US Government's $800 Million Fish Taser

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    joey joey に公開 2021 年 06 月 10 日
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