Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • On this episode of China Uncensored,

  • I miss Ask Jeeves.

  • Welcome back to China Uncensored,

  • I'm your host Chris Chappell.

  • Good news, everyone!

  • Google has finally taken the chains off.

  • Back in May,

  • Google removed its famousdon't be evilmotto

  • from its code of conduct.

  • Google's new motto is:

  • Don't let anyone find out that you're evil.

  • Moral relativism is cool.

  • What is evil, anyway?

  • Don't be unprofitable.

  • Don't learn from your mistakes.

  • No, history never repeats itself.

  • Or at least that's what I assume from this article from the Intercept.

  • It turns out, there's a tratorious Google employee who still hasn't

  • gotten the hang of being evil but hiding it per company policy.

  • Because that employee revealed Google's top secret project:

  • making a censored Android app for China that uses their search engine.

  • The secret project is called Dragonfly,

  • and it's allegedly been in the works among a select number of employees

  • since the spring of 2017.

  • We reached out to Google for comment about their search engine in China.

  • TheirGoogle Spokespersonsaid they do have mobile apps in China,

  • but they don't comment on speculation about future plans.

  • It's like if your wife asks,

  • You're not going to eat that entire box of Cheez-Its

  • in one sitting, are you?”

  • And you reply,

  • There are things I'm going to eat,

  • but I don't comment on specific future eating plans.”

  • So China has a pretty big internet market:

  • 750 million Internet users.

  • That's bigger than the entire population of Europe.

  • And it seems like,

  • well there's a ton of money Google could be making in China.

  • And now that Google isn't concerned about not being evil,

  • they can finally tap into it.

  • With the help of anunnamedChinese partner company.

  • As you know, the Chinese Communist Party

  • likes to keep a tight grip on the Internet.

  • Otherwise Chinese citizens might learn dangerous things,

  • like how their government was totally willing to massacre

  • a bunch of students in Tiananmen Square.

  • With the new Google search engine app for Android,

  • Chinese people don't need to know all that.

  • Because they won't even be able to find links

  • to troubling informational websites with y

  • ou know, facts

  • like the BBC or Wikipedia.

  • Now you might be concerned that Google's

  • new alleged Chinese search engine would create

  • some kind of bad precedent.

  • That, if the biggest search engine in the world

  • is willing to cave to Chinese censorship demands,

  • why should any company resist?

  • It's a fair point, but may I remind you

  • HOW MUCH MONEY IS ON THE LINE HERE, PEOPLE!

  • In fact, maybe Google's new motto is actually:

  • Don't be unprofitable.

  • After all, being evil can make you so much more money.

  • Clearly that important point was lost on the Google employee

  • who leaked the secret plan.

  • He told The Intercept,

  • “I'm against large companies and governments collaborating

  • in the oppression of their people,

  • and feel like transparency around

  • what's being done is in the public interest,”

  • and thatwhat is done in China will become a template f

  • or many other nations.”

  • What?

  • Are you saying that this will embolden

  • other authoritarian nations

  • to further limit free information?

  • Well, don't worry,

  • because other authoritarian nations don't have

  • 750 million internet users.

  • Cha-ching.

  • Google is a company with 88,000 employees.

  • You can't expect them all to have jumped on

  • the evil is okay bandwagon.

  • So to minimize the chance of leaks,

  • only “a handful of top executives and managers,”

  • knew about project Dragonfly.

  • Executives like the current CEO.

  • Last December, he travelled to China

  • and met with top Communist Party officials,

  • who had great money-making ideas,

  • as communist officials always do.

  • That same month,

  • Google opened an artificial intelligence

  • research center in Beijing.

  • In May, they brought their file management app

  • to the Chinese market.

  • And in July, they launched a fun game

  • for the popular Chinese messaging app WeChat.

  • Let's just say there are some privacy concerns about WeChat.

  • Clearly not a concern for Google, though!

  • In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if Google's unnamed

  • Chinese partner company is Tencent,

  • the maker of WeChat.

  • I wonder if this new app will also give user data

  • directly to the Chinese government,

  • just like WeChat does!

  • Now some people have compared Google's move to

  • the shameful history of IBM in Nazi Germany.

  • I mean, I'm not making that comparison.

  • I'm just saying, some people have

  • and now you know that.

  • But giving in to the Chinese regime

  • isn't actually new for Google.

  • They were in China before.

  • In 2006, Google set up

  • a highly censored version of their search engine

  • for the Chinese market.

  • And Google got slammed for it.

  • Here's a clip from a 2006 Congressional hearing about

  • American tech companies.

  • US Congressman Chris Smith was not too happy with Google.

  • When a user enters a forbidden word,

  • such as 'democracy' or 'Chinese torture' or 'Falun Gong,'

  • the search results are blocked,

  • or you are redirected to a misleading site,

  • and the user's computer can be frozen

  • for unspecified periods of time…”

  • “...It is hard not to draw the conclusion that Google

  • has seriously compromised its 'Don't Be Evil' policy.”

  • Well guess what, foolish politician actually trying to call out

  • a big corporation for it shady behavior?

  • Google doesn't have thedon't be evilpolicy anymore.

  • Take that!

  • Problem solved.

  • So what happened to that censored Chinese version of Google

  • that Congressman Smith was complaining about in 2006?

  • Four years later, Google backed out.

  • In a 2010 official blog post, they said:

  • Guess what?

  • The Chinese Communist Party hacked us.

  • And they targeted the gmail accounts of human rights activists.

  • Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal.

  • Google stood up to the evil Chinese regime.

  • They announced that they were uncensoring their search engine,

  • and if that meant the regime kicked them out of China,

  • so be it.

  • And so it was.

  • Google co-founder Sergey Brin,

  • who partly grew up in the Soviet Union,

  • told the Wall Street Journal that he was worried about

  • China's totalitarianism.

  • And, at the time,

  • I praised Google for doing the right thing.

  • It turned out later,

  • their pull-out might have been about

  • more than just doing what was right.

  • It was also maybe because they were

  • hardly making any money in China.

  • But don't worry.

  • Google is under new leadership now!

  • And their new motto is:

  • Don't learn from your mistakes.

  • Because, the lesson from this should have been:

  • It's really hard for Google to make money in the Chinese market

  • because the Chinese regime will always

  • stack the cards against you in favor of Chinese companies

  • while also hacking you and stealing your intellectual property.

  • But the lesson the new Google CEO took was:

  • If at first you don't succeed,

  • try, try again.

  • But now with more evil.

  • The sad part is,

  • Google is hardly alone in wanting to be in China:

  • Bing and Yahoo already have censored search engines there,

  • although they have a fraction of the market share

  • of Chinese companies like Baidu.

  • Apple has made a huge investment in China.

  • And we all know that Mark Zuckerberg

  • will literally run through the Beijing smog

  • to get Facebook there.

  • But at one point, Google was alone

  • in standing up to the Chinese Communist Party.

  • Which makes this new search engine thing

  • so much more disappointing.

  • And now the question on my mind is,

  • if Google does get back into the Chinese market,

  • and is desperate to make money there,

  • what happens if someday the Chinese Communist Party

  • decides it doesn't like how Google operates outside China?

  • Like they do with, I don't know,

  • international airlines that call Taiwan a country.

  • To get into the Chinese market,

  • would Google be more evil outside China, too?

  • As someone who hosts the world's

  • most important English-language satirical news show

  • about China on YouTube,

  • which is owned by Google,

  • I'm a little bit concerned.

  • When you have a moment, try this.

  • Do a search for China Uncensored.

  • China uncensorship pollution”!?

  • That's a funny autocomplete!

  • Oddly enough, our newer, much smaller podcast,

  • China Unscripted, does come up.

  • We've also had fans of the show tell us

  • that they've stopped seeing China Uncensored

  • in recommended videos.

  • That they get no notification of new episodes,

  • even when they have the notification bell turned on.

  • We're constantly having videos get demonetized.

  • And get this:

  • Some viewers have told me they were suddenly

  • unsubscribed from China Uncensored.

  • That even happened to Shelley,

  • who you know,

  • is on the show.

  • And I'm sure all of these problems will get much better

  • once Google has serious financial stakes in China.

  • There's no evidence that Google

  • is intentionally targeting China Uncensored.

  • It could just be that Google is inept.

  • And that is completely possible.

  • You see, China is no less totalitarian than it was back in 2010,

  • when Google initially pulled out.

  • In fact, they are increasingly using online surveillance

  • to control Chinese people.

  • But even if Google doesn't care about being evil anymore

  • even if all they care about is making money for their shareholders,

  • or if they're just drooling over the idea of getting a piece of

  • 750 million internet users

  • going in to China is a bad idea.

  • Having a Chinese partner company

  • may help Google make more money,

  • but there's definitely a price to pay.

  • And it might be higher than they think.

  • Which is why Google should really change their motto to:

  • Don't be stupid.

  • What do you think about Google's re-entry into China?

  • What should their new motto be?

  • Leave your comments below.

  • And now, it's time to answer questions from fans

  • who support the show on the crowd funding website Patreon.

  • Alfred Schneider aks,

  • Chris, I've heard that PRC have built

  • some delightful vacation resorts

  • in the South China Sea.

  • Which one would you like to visit the most, and why?”

  • Oh Alfred, that is probably the toughest question

  • I've been asked so far.

  • There are so many; how can I choose?

  • Yes, the Chinese Communist Party is developing

  • a booming tourism industry in the South China Sea.

  • Particularly in disputed territories.

  • I mean, my favorite Chinese state-run media the Global Times

  • makes a vacation there sound so appealing.

  • Look at that beachfront view.

  • Since 2013, around 10,000 Chinese tourists have been able

  • to enjoy the natural beauty of the Xisha Islands.”

  • Otherwise known as the Paracel Islands,