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  • Hello! Yes, the day is finally here, we're wearing bright green and we're starting in Beckenham Junction

  • to finally go and do Secrets of the Trams.

  • So we're out on the trams, but before we can start our journey I feel like I need to bring you up to speed

  • with a bit of history.

  • When the trams were launched back in 2000, there were three routes with three colours

  • Even the trams themselves were red in colour.

  • TfL took control of the trams, though, in 2008, and gave the network its now-distinctive green livery.

  • By this time, a fourth route was also in operation, and so the map looked like this.

  • And our first stop is...

  • we're at Beckenham Road, as the tram that we've just been on leaves there.

  • Something to notice: there's a single track over here.

  • That line there is the National Rail system.

  • Now, interestingly, the trams are actually timetabled to pass it at the same point,

  • but, obviously, you can't have two trams at the single platform at the same time.

  • So, in practice that rarely works, but it is interesting to note

  • that, in terms of scheduling, they should be here at the same time.

  • There's a junction just up there, where the trams wait for each other to pass.

  • Now, Roding Valley is the least-used station on the Tube,

  • and I very much suspect that our next station has got low passenger numbers, too.

  • Welcome to Birkbeck, which features, always, in the top 10 list of least used National Rail stations

  • that's rightbecause half of it is on the tram, and half of it is on the National Rail.

  • And, therefore, it's weird that once every half an hour a big, 8-car Southern train

  • comes through to this somewhat dead station.

  • It's a weird, quiet, strange place,

  • and I bet you've never been to Birkbeck.

  • Now, when the tram network was built,

  • a lot of it was made easier by the fact that it used the alignments of old,

  • existing, and, in some cases, disused railways,

  • and the first clue we see of this is at our next stop.

  • We're at Woodside, which might possibly be my most favourite stop

  • on the whole tram network, because there's a whole bunch of history here.

  • Woodside railway station is just there; an old National RailBritish Rail, as it was

  • railway station, which they then converted into a tram stop.

  • So, if you look behind me, you can see here there's this building that spans the railway,

  • and that is the old, original station building.

  • But come down the side, and there's even more history to see.

  • And here, down by the side of the station, you can see is this ramp. That's because when the station opened in 1871

  • there was a racecourse just down the road nearby, and this ramp was installed

  • to allow them to load and unload horses to go to the racecourse!

  • And, it's still here today.

  • The next place down the line is almost a tram stop that shares its name with a London Underground station.

  • We're at Blackhorse Lane tram stop. Don't get that confused with Blackhorse Road

  • on the Victoria and the Overground.

  • And we are here to see Addiscombe railway park.

  • You'll see that the tram stop is over here, but down here...

  • Ooo, look at that. Can you see? That is clearly the old alignment

  • of an old railway with the road bridge going across.

  • "What's that? A lost railway, Geoff?

  • Surely, you need a 'Lost Railways in London' video about that?"

  • And we have, we've done one, so click in the corner right now

  • to find out more about Addiscombe, and the line down to Selsdon.

  • We took a pleasant ten minute walk along the old railway line,

  • noting that there is nothing left at all to see of the old Addiscombe station,

  • and then we got to Lebanon Road.

  • So, we've now hit the part of the tram network where the tram tracks actually in the road.

  • The cars, and buses, and trams all share it. It gets a little bit congested, and that's why here,

  • at Lebanon Road, they've staggered the stops so the eastbound one is over there,

  • and we're here on the westbound one. It's the only place, as far as we know,

  • on the tram network where it happens.

  • It's also just one of three stations where, bizarrelyhow antiquated is this?–

  • there's still a payphone. [phone rings]

  • Oh.

  • [phone rings]

  • Hello?

  • Oh, it's me.

  • Hi, Geoff. Where are you?

  • Getting back on the tram, and look at the moquette seating pattern

  • it's made by Wallace-Sewell the same people that design the moquette for the

  • We had a quick look at the history plaque at Sandilands

  • and then went to find another old railway that the trams re-use at Croydon

  • The line between West Croydon and Wimbledon used to be a single track british railline which also closed in 1997 to have a tram network to take his place.

  • An oddity of that is that West Croydon's three platforms

  • on London 1 , 3 and 4

  • So where is Platform 2?

  • Well, it used to be a bay platform, where the single line used to terminate

  • and it's mostly been filled in now, to be part of Platform 3

  • but if you look closely, there's a still a short stub left of it here that you can see at the western end of the station

  • The trams cut right through Croydon high street at this point

  • the most obvious example of the trams being classified as what's known as an 'open' system

  • And round the corner, a place designed specifically for something that a lot of people

  • We've got Centrale tram stop here which I really like

  • Now, when the tram system opened in 2000

  • Why? because Croydon opened up a brand new shopping centre

  • Leaving Croydon, and you get to Wandle Park

  • And it's at this point that the trams are also running in the same place as the old Surrey Iron Railway

  • Which went between here and Wandsworth

  • Now trams, are really just like buses on rails

  • But out of the town, they can really move fast

  • Up to 60 kilometres per hour

  • And a bit like the DLR where you can pretend that you're driving

  • You can sort of see out of the front too and pretend that you're in control

  • And next up, yet another point where we encounter an old abandoned railway

  • We're at Merton Park station, the tram there of course heading back up to Croydon

  • The Merton, Tooting and Wimbledon railway

  • That closed in the 1920's to passengers, but survived for freight until the 1970's

  • * THIS TRAM, IS FOR WIMBLEDON *

  • And so onto our final stop ... Wimbledon

  • And platform 10 has been split into 10a, and 10b

  • If you've never been on the trams before, I say "Why not? What's wrong with you!"

  • Me? I don't even live near a tram stop, and yet I'm going back in

  • for one last ride on a tram, and somehow .. get home, see ya!

Hello! Yes, the day is finally here, we're wearing bright green and we're starting in Beckenham Junction

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Secrets Of The Trams

  • 14 1
    joey joey に公開 2021 年 05 月 29 日
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