Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • [On my worst days, I make $60.]

    悪い日は60ドルだね。

  • [A doctor makes about $40 per month.]

    でも医者は月に40ドルだよ。

  • Did you catch that? This guy makes more in one day than a doctor makes in a month.

    聞こえましたか?彼は医者がひと月に稼ぐ額を、 一日で稼ぎます

  • And he's a taxi driver.

    彼はタクシードライバーです。

  • Well, he's actually a trained engineer, but engineers make even less than doctors.

    実は彼はエンジニアです。ただエンジニアは医者よりも稼げません。

  • [So I like being a taxi driver. Not an engineer]

    だからエンジニアじゃなくて、タクシーがいいんだよ。

  • Welcome to the Cuban economy.

    Cuban economy へようこそ。

  • Right after the socialist revolution in 1959, Fidel Castro's government seized almost all private businesses and land.

    1959年の共産主義革命の後、カストロは民間事業をほとんど 撤廃させました。

  • You won't have to worry about next year. The state will do your planning from now on!

    来年の心配をする必要はない。これからは国が計画を立ててくれるのだ。

  • Every restaurant, factory, hospital and home was property of the government.

    レストラン、工場、病院、家はすべて政府のものとなりました。

  • The State set prices for everything and decided how much people got paid.

    国はすべての価格を決め、 いくら払うべきかを決めました。

  • The private sector disappeared overnight.

    民間の分野は一夜にして消えました。

  • The world these men live in desperately needs economic reforms.

    この男の国は必ず経済改革をしなければなりません。

  • You can see the result of this if you go looking for food in Havana today.

    ハバナで食事をすれば、 この結果が分かります。

  • When I showed up, I was pretty excited to see what street food was on offer.

    顔を出したときは、どんなストリートフードがあるのか、かなり楽しみでした。

  • But all I could find was this. Just this. Ham sandwiches. Everywhere.

    これしかないんです!これだけ!ハムサンド、どこにいっても。

  • Here is a typical scene in a Cuban eatery: too many employees in an empty establishment with empty shelves.

    キューバの食堂はだいたい次のような感じです。多すぎる従業員、 空っぽの店、空っぽの棚。

  • They're just waiting for food deliveries from the government, and putting in their eight hours so they can go home.

    みんな配給を待つだけです。家に帰る時間まで、8時間をむだにします。

  • They get paid the same whether they sell one plate of food, or fifty.

    一皿売っても、五十皿売っても、給料は同じです。

  • This model just doesn't work.

    このモデルはうまくいかないんです。

  • Cuba survived for many years with subsidies from the Soviet Union.

    キューバは、ソ連からの補助金で長年生き延びてきました。

  • [Long live communism!]

    共産主義万歳!

  • But since its collapse, the economy‘s been getting worse every year.

    しかし、その崩壊後、景気は年々悪化しています。

  • This lady is showing me her government ration cards that she's kept for decades.

    この女性は、何十年も保管している政府の配給カードを見せてくれているんです。

  • Cubans use these cards to go to the storage houses to get their monthly rations.

    キューバ人はこのカードを使って貯蔵庫に行き、毎月の配給品を受け取ることができます。

  • [Today, we get less cooking oil, less grains, less sugar. We don't even get soap or detergent anymore. Everyday we get less and less.]

    今日、私たちは食用油、穀物、砂糖の量を減らしています。石鹸や洗剤さえも手に入らなくなりました。毎日、私たちの手に入るものは少なくなっています。

  • [Have they improved in any aspect at all?]

    何か改善された点はありますか?

  • The government realized this was becoming a problem in the 90s, and started giving out private licenses, fueling a small but growing private sector.

    90年代に入り、政府はこの問題を認識し、民間のライセンスを与えるようになり、小さいながらも民間セクターの成長を促しました。

  • I stumbled upon a private restaurant in Havana, and it was a totally different experience than the public ones.

    ハバナで偶然見つけたプライベートレストランは、パブリックなレストランとは全く異なる体験でした。

  • There was actually movement, and good service.

    実際に動きもあり、サービスも良かったです。

  • The owners had to sell good food if they wanted to stay in business.

    オーナーは、商売を続けるためには、おいしいものを売らなければならなりません。

  • Which brings me back to the taxi driver and the doctor.

    そこで、タクシーの運転手さんとお医者さんの話に戻ります。

  • The reason why taxi drivers make so much more than doctors is because they have private licenses.

    タクシー運転手が医者より収入が多いのは、私的な免許を持っているからです。

  • Their salaries are not set by the state, and they can charge tourists high prices.

    彼らの給料は国が決めているわけではないので、観光客に高い値段をつけることができます。

  • I paid $25 to get from the airport into Havana.

    空港からハバナに行くのに25ドルも払ったんです。

  • And in that 30 minutes, this driver made more than the average monthly salary of a Cuban, which is $20.

    そしてその30分で、このドライバーはキューバ人の平均月給である20ドル以上を稼いだのです。

  • [I put in eight hours as a licensed nurse, and daily, I don't even bring in $2.]

    私は看護師として8時間働いていますが、毎日2ドルも入ってきません。

  • One of the problems with this is that you get highly trained workers leaving their trade to go do mediocre work in the private sector.

    この場合の問題の一つは、高度な訓練を受けた労働者がその職業を離れ、民間企業で平凡な仕事をするようになることです。

  • This guy is an engineer, but he's cooking in a private restaurant.

    この人はエンジニアだけど、個人経営のレストランで料理してるんですよ。

  • These guys are accountants by trade, but are making a killing driving around tourists on taxi bikes.

    彼らは本業は会計士だが、タクシーバイクで観光客を乗せて大儲けしています。

  • This woman is a nurse, but she hasn't worked in a hospital in years.

    この女性は看護師だが、病院で働くのは何年ぶりでしょう。

  • This guy is an electrical engineer, but he opened up a barber shop in his house and makes ten times more than he would in his field of study.

    この人は電気技師ですが、自宅で床屋を開き、専門分野の10倍以上の収入を得ています。

  • Imagine trying to live on the Cuban average salary of $20 per month.

    キューバの平均給与である月給20ドルで生活しようとすることを想像してください。

  • When you ask them how they do it, they all have the same response.

    その方法を尋ねると、皆同じ答えが返ってきます。

  • [We all have to do something on top of our official job.]

    みんな、公的な仕事のほかに、何かをしなければならないのです。

  • [If you don't, you won't eat.]

    そうしないと、食べられないんですよ。

  • Just beneath the surface in Cuba is a bustling informal market where Cubans make an additional income on top of their official salary, just to survive.

    キューバには、公的な給与に加え、生きるために必要な収入を得るためのインフォーマル市場が存在します。

  • [We survive thanks to this dark marketthis underground market.]

    私たちは、この闇市場、つまり地下市場のおかげで生き延びているのです。

  • [When I leave my house and cross the street to buy a newspaper, I'm committing the first crime of the day.]

    家を出て、新聞を買うために通りを渡るとき、私はその日最初の犯罪を犯しているのです。

  • [Because that old man is selling me the paper illegally.]

    あのおじさんは、私に違法に紙を売りつけるからです。

  • [The official vendor keeps the papers and sells them to the old man.]

    官吏は紙を預かり、老人に売ります。

  • We tend to associate black markets with dangerous activities.

    闇市というと、危険な行為を連想しがちです。

  • But in Cuba, people sell illegal popsicles, or newspapersnot to get rich, but just to survive.

    でも、キューバでは、違法なアイスキャンディーや新聞を売るのは、金持ちになるためではなく、生きていくためなんです。

  • But things are slowly changing.

    しかし、状況は少しずつ変わってきています。

  • Since Fidel's brother Raul took over in 2008, the number of private licenses has increased significantly every year, and 20% of the economy is now private.

    2008年にフィデルの弟のラウルが政権をとって以来、民間免許の数は毎年大幅に増え、今や経済の2割が民間企業です。

  • But still, most Cubans are jaded by the decades they have had to use illegal creativity just to survive.

    しかし、それでも、ほとんどのキューバ人は、生き延びるためだけに何十年も違法な創作活動をしなければならなかったので、色あせた状態になっています。

  • [We live in a country with only one party.]

    私たちは、一つの政党しかない国に住んでいます。

  • [What could possibly happen? Could there really be change?]

    何が起こるのでしょう?本当に変化があるのでしょうか?

[On my worst days, I make $60.]

悪い日は60ドルだね。

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

ワンタップで英和辞典検索 単語をクリックすると、意味が表示されます

A2 初級 日本語 Vox キューバ タクシー ハバナ エンジニア 医者

キューバの運転手は医者より稼げる?その理由とは

  • 6908 246
    joey joey に公開 2022 年 02 月 19 日
動画の中の単語