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  • This video is brought to you by Squarespace Not too long ago, we've been led to believe

  • that dairy undoubtedly does a body good.

  • And, we've been quite receptive to it, even as far as labeling it as its own fundamental

  • food group.

  • But, as society tends to do to nutrition, today, those long-held dairy beliefs have

  • been heavily challenged.

  • In this video, we're going to dive into the research to better understand this notorious

  • cattle concoction.

  • First, let's break down the contents found in dairy and its potential benefits.

  • One of the most important contents is dairy's high-quality protein.

  • The dairy proteins whey and casein are both extremely popular within the fitness industry

  • as protein powder supplements aiding in muscle growth.

  • The research specifically on whey have linked it to improving insulin function, lowering

  • triglycerides and lowering blood pressure.

  • Casein has its own unique property, being a slow-digesting protein that supports not

  • only muscle growth, but also muscle preservation.

  • Dairy also contains immune system-supporting proteins known as immunoglobulins.

  • The high protein in dairy can also help improve satiation, thus help you eat less and lose

  • weight.

  • We also have a good dose of healthy fats in dairy like conjugated linoleic acid, which

  • might help suppress appetite, omega-3 fatty acids, purported to impose numerous cardiovascular

  • health benefits, and trans-palmitoleic acid, believed to have protective properties against

  • diabetes.

  • Dairy's fat composition, though, is heavily influenced by a cow's genetics and diet.

  • Dairy produced by organic grass-fed cows tend to carry more of these healthy fats, while

  • conventional grain-fed cows produce dairy with more saturated fats.

  • And of course, dairy also contains many important MICROnutrients, like calcium, potassium, fat-soluble

  • vitamins A and D, vitamin B12, riboflavin, iodine, and magnesium.

  • Clearly, dairy is quite stacked with health benefits.

  • But what about its potential health risks?

  • The one clear risk we know for sure is the common issue of lactose intolerance, where

  • one lacks the enzymes to properly digest and absorb the dairy sugars galactose and lactose.

  • Instead, it passes directly into our large intestines, causing issues like stomach cramps,

  • bloating, and diarrhea.

  • Some even report sinus infections and mucus development.

  • Roughly 65% of the human population have some degree of lactose intolerance.

  • Its highest prevalence is among people of East Asian descent, where it affects more

  • than 90% of adults.

  • On the other hand, in populations with a longstanding dependency on dairy products, like Northern

  • Europeans, lactose intolerance is as low as 5%.

  • Another purported risk is cardiovascular disease.

  • Dairy does contain saturated fats and cholesterol, both of which in high consumption are linked

  • to heart disease.

  • But this is more so a matter of excessive consumption rather than a problem attributed

  • to dairy itself.

  • At moderate dairy intakes in an overall healthy diet, cardiovascular disease isn't much

  • of an issue.

  • One systematic overview of 10 cohort studies concluded that drinking milk may actually

  • decrease the risk of heart disease.

  • And as mentioned before, dairy from organic, grass-fed cows contain more of the healthy

  • fats that can actually improve cardiovascular health.

  • What about claims that dairy is acidic?

  • Some researchers have hypothesized that dairy might acidify our bodies from its high protein

  • and phosphate content, potentially landing to a detrimental bone health.

  • However, the scientific literature does not support these claims since dairy does not

  • produce acid when metabolized nor cause metabolic acidosis.

  • Overall, acid-base changes in our bodies are not directly influenced by our diet.

  • There are more observational studies, though, showing that dairy consumption doesn't exactly

  • harm nor improve our bone health, quashing old beliefs that milk makes stronger bones.

  • The biggest point against dairy made by anti-dairy advocates is dairy's hormone content.

  • Two of which are estrogen and bovine growth hormones.

  • The theory is that both are potential causes for cancer.

  • But is that actually true?

  • Fortunately, these hormones are broken into peptides by the liver before ever getting

  • into our blood circulation.

  • It's only in extremely high consumption levels do we see an actual change in our own

  • blood levels of these hormones.

  • But based on a mice study, we're talking about concentrations 1000 times more than

  • what's found in milk.

  • On top of that, bovine growth hormone, specifically, isn't even biologically active in humans.

  • Essentially, unless you're directly injecting these hormones into your body, they're not

  • going to do much of anything.

  • However, another hormone found in dairy, known as insulin growth factor 1, or IGF-1 for short,

  • is a bit different.

  • Our body itself creates IGF-1 since it is rather important for cognitive development

  • and bone growth.

  • IGF-1 also has the desirable function of stimulating the growth of lean muscle tissue.

  • But it also stimulates the growth of cells in generalpotentially even CANCER cells.

  • High dairy consumption, especially from cows given a synthetic version of bovine growth

  • hormones, do in fact increase blood IGF-1 levels by anywhere between 2 to 10%.

  • However, the current research on the relationship of IGF-1 and cancer isinconsistent.

  • Some show an increased risk association while others show a potentially lower association

  • risk.

  • These inconsistencies are likely not concerning enough to undermine the evidence-supported

  • cognitive and anabolic benefits of IGF-1.

  • Also, practically any other protein-rich food can increase IGF-1 levels, so it isn't exactly

  • a dairy-unique issue.

  • In the big picture, we might be better off to have at least some dietary IGF-1, in which

  • dairy can help.

  • In terms of cancer and dairy in general, findings again remain inconsistent.

  • The American Institute of Cancer Research concluded that milk probably protects against

  • certain cancers like colorectal cancer while having only limited evidence linking milk

  • to cancers like prostate cancer.

  • Even then, dairy-related cancer findings are only associations.

  • We have no data showing any causal relationships.

  • Clearly, more research is definitely needed in this matter.

  • Now, let's revisit: based on the findings, is dairy good or bad?

  • The answer, is, unsurprisingly, “it depends.”

  • First and foremost, it depends on your personal dairy and lactose tolerance.

  • Avoid dairy if you have clear adverse reactions to it.

  • Keep in mind though, not all dairy products are the same.

  • Some dairy items, like swiss cheese and concentrated whey protein supplements, have very little

  • lactose and galactose in it, making it tolerable for some dairy sensitive individuals.

  • It will be up to you to try out different dairy products to see what you can personally

  • tolerate.

  • Outside of tolerance, dairy being good or bad depends again on the dairy product.

  • Generally, highly processed, high-calorie dairy products filled with sugar ARE overall

  • bad for you and should be avoided when possible.

  • Fermented dairy products, on the other, like plain yogurt and cultured cheeses, are exceptionally

  • great, even containing probiotics that can help support a healthy gut.

  • Products like milk, cottage cheese, and sour cream, all fall somewhere in between.

  • In my opinion, it's clear that the overall benefits of dairy abundantly outweigh the

  • overall potential harms.

  • We KNOW that dairy contains many nutrients vital to both our health and fitness.

  • Outside of lactose intolerance, we have seen very mixed evidence supporting the severity

  • of dairy's harms.

  • That being said, for the people that can tolerate it, moderate dairy intake overall is indeed

  • good for you and can be a solid piece to your dietary puzzle.

  • Fortunately, even if you choose to avoid dairy for other reasons, like ethical reasons or

  • simply not finding it tasteful, then that's completely fine.

  • There are plenty of other non-dairy food choices that can provide the very same nutrients that

  • make dairy great.

  • Ultimately, the choice of consuming dairy or not, are in your hands.

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  • For all you health and fitness buffs watching this video, I'm sure some of you aspire

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  • I hope you all enjoyed this video.

  • Please thumbs up and share it with your dairy-loving friends!

  • Subscribe if you want more.

  • And as always, thank you for watching and GET YOUR PROTEIN!

This video is brought to you by Squarespace Not too long ago, we've been led to believe

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Is Dairy Bad For You? - The Truth About Milk

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    joey joey に公開 2021 年 05 月 09 日
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