Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • - [Host] Thanks to Skillshare for sponsoring this episode.

    - ホスト】このエピソードをスポンサーしてくれたSkillshareに感謝します。

  • This was humanity's first introduction

    これが人類の最初の導入である。

  • to nuclear power, the atomic bomb.

    そして、原子力発電、原子爆弾へとつながっていった。

  • - And this is a nuclear power plant,

    - しかも、これは原子力発電所です。

  • which you may know from all the times

    あなたはすべての時代から知っているかもしれませんが

  • that they've broken down in history

    歴史の中で壊れていったものを

  • and scared the crap out of people.

    と人々を驚かせた。

  • Hello, HBO's Chernobyl.

    こんにちは、HBOのチェルノブイリです。

  • - But you've actually been lied to about nuclear energy.

    - しかし、実際には原子力については嘘をつかれています。

  • And in order to understand those lies,

    そして、その嘘を理解するためには

  • we first have to talk about where the energy comes from.

    そのためにはまず、エネルギーがどこから来るのかを考えなければなりません。

  • - In 1938, scientists discovered nuclear fission.

    - 1938年、科学者たちは核分裂を発見した。

  • They did this by slamming an atom of uranium with a neutron.

    それは、ウランの原子に中性子をぶつけたものだ。

  • It would divide into two

    2つに分かれることになります。

  • and release a large amount of energy.

    と、大量のエネルギーを放出します。

  • Not only this, but during the nuclear fission reaction

    それだけでなく、核分裂反応の際には

  • up to three neutrons are ejected,

    最大で3個の中性子が放出されます。

  • which can trigger further fission reactions of more atoms,

    これにより、さらに多くの原子の核分裂反応が引き起こされます。

  • meaning more energy is released.

    つまり、より多くのエネルギーが放出されることになります。

  • This is known as a chain reaction.

    これを連鎖反応といいます。

  • - During World War II,

    - 第二次世界大戦中。

  • America would use the same technology

    アメリカも同じ技術を使う

  • to create the first atomic bomb.

    このようにして、最初の原子爆弾を作ることができました。

  • But it wasn't until 1955 that the same scientific principles

    しかし、1955年になって、同じ科学的原理で

  • were used to create the first nuclear power plant

    は、最初の原子力発電所の

  • that generated electricity.

    そのためには、電気を作ることが必要です。

  • - In the 1970s, psychologists started to map

    - 1970年代に入り、心理学者たちは以下のような地図を作り始めました。

  • people's anxieties about nuclear destruction

    核破壊に対する人々の不安は

  • and the past cold war, onto nuclear power plants,

    と過去の冷戦時代には、原子力発電所に

  • which were now cropping up around the world.

    このようにして、世界各地で生まれてきたのが、日本の技術力です。

  • Then came the 1979 thriller, The China Syndrome,

    そして、1979年に発表されたスリラー映画『チャイナ・シンドローム』。

  • a movie about a fictional nuclear reactor meltdown.

    架空の原子炉のメルトダウンをテーマにした映画。

  • Which was released on March 6th, 1979.

    1979年3月6日に発売されました。

  • And just 22 days later,

    そしてわずか22日後。

  • a real partial nuclear reactor meltdown

    本物の原子炉の一部がメルトダウンした場合

  • happened at Three Mile Island.

    スリーマイル島で起こったこと。

  • Talk about free advertisement for your movie.

    自分の映画の無料広告の話。

  • The coincidence of a Hollywood film

    ハリウッド映画の偶然の産物

  • and this cultural nuclear reactor breakdown

    そしてこの文化的な原子炉の破壊

  • coming together really shot into the mainstream

    が揃うことで、主流になった

  • this negative connotation with nuclear energy.

    このように、原子力にはネガティブなイメージがつきまといます。

  • From the release of this movie to 1988,

    この映画の公開から1988年まで

  • 67 planned nuclear power plants were canceled.

    計画されていた67基の原子力発電所が中止された。

  • In 1986 Chernobyl happened, which was caused by human error.

    1986年にチェルノブイリが起きましたが、その原因はヒューマンエラーでした。

  • As the temperature of the reactor core became too high

    炉心の温度が高くなりすぎると

  • and an explosion created a nuclear cloud across Europe.

    と、爆発によってヨーロッパ中に核の雲が発生しました。

  • I scream cried while watching Chernobyl.

    チェルノブイリを見ながら泣いた。

  • I remember thinking to myself, okay,

    なるほど、と思ったのを覚えています。

  • is nuclear energy a truly invisible horror?

    原発は本当に見えない恐怖なのか?

  • Right after that, in 1989, we got The Simpsons

    その直後の1989年には「ザ・シンプソンズ」が登場しました。

  • where we see people diving into nuclear waste.

    核廃棄物の中に飛び込む人たちの姿がある。

  • And our favorite idiot, Homer,

    そして私たちの大好きなバカ、ホーマー。

  • who we all picture as a safety inspector

    私たちがイメージする安全検査官は

  • at a nuclear reactor.

    原子炉での

  • As recent as 2011, we have the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    最近では、2011年に福島原発事故がありました。

  • And all of this combined made it really hard

    これらのことが重なって、とても大変でした。

  • to not be afraid of nuclear energy.

    核エネルギーを恐れないために

  • - But when you look more into it, you find that

    - しかし、もっと詳しく調べてみると

  • no one died at Three Mile Island.

    スリーマイル島では誰も死ななかった。

  • And most epidemiological studies found

    また、ほとんどの疫学調査で

  • that it had no detectable health consequences.

    検知可能な健康への影響はないとしている。

  • After 30 years, only 51 people died from

    30年後には、51人しか亡くなっていません。

  • the incident at Chernobyl.

    チェルノブイリの事故のことです。

  • And scientific studies found few health risks

    また、科学的な研究では、健康被害はほとんどないとされています。

  • connected to radiation exposure after Fukushima.

    福島原発事故後の放射線被ばくとの関連性について

  • - Take this recent In a Nutshell video

    - 最近のIn a Nutshellビデオを見てみましょう。

  • linked in the description.

    説明文にリンクされています。

  • It shows how using coal, oil, natural gas,

    石炭、石油、天然ガスをどのように使っているかを示しています。

  • and biomass has killed 100 million people

    そして、バイオマスは1億人の人々を殺した

  • in the past 50 years.

    過去50年の間に

  • This was due to pollution created by

    による汚染が原因であった。

  • the byproducts of burning fossil fuels.

    化石燃料を燃やしたときにできる副産物です。

  • - The World Health Organization explains

    - 世界保健機関の説明

  • that it's safer to work in a nuclear power plant

    原子力発電所で働く方が安全であることを

  • than in a big city office,

    大都市のオフィスよりも

  • as the urban air pollution of ozone, sulfur dioxide,

    オゾンや二酸化硫黄などの都市大気汚染として

  • carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide

    一酸化炭素、二酸化窒素

  • causes 7 million deaths annually

    年間7百万人が死亡

  • - Only 0.005% of the average American's

    - 平均的なアメリカ人のわずか0.005%が

  • yearly radiation dose comes from nuclear power.

    年間の放射線量は、原子力発電によるものです。

  • This is 200 times less than a cross country flight,

    これは、クロスカントリーフライトの200倍も少ない。

  • a hundred times less than what we get from coal,

    石炭に比べて100分の1の量である。

  • and about the same as eating one banana per year?

    と、1年に1本のバナナを食べるのと同じくらい?

  • Wait, so if I'm scared of nuclear energy

    待って、もし私が原子力を怖がっていたら

  • I also have to be scared of a banana?

    また、私はバナナを怖がる必要がありますか?

  • But like peanut butter and bananas on toast is my culture.

    でも、ピーナッツバターとバナナのトーストのように、私の文化です。

  • Also being gay, I hate holding bananas like this

    また、私はゲイなので、このようにバナナを持つことが嫌いです。

  • 'cause it just reminds me of getting bullied.

    だって、いじめられたことを思い出すんだもの。

  • - [Host] There's also this study, showing that a CT scan

    - また、この研究では、CTスキャンが

  • of the abdomen involves about 10 times

    腹部の約10倍の大きさの

  • the radiation exposure that the average

    の放射線量は、平均的なものです。

  • nuclear worker gets in a year

    原子力発電所の労働者が1年で得るもの

  • - Or that living in a big polluted city

    - あるいは、汚染された大都会に住んでいると

  • increases your mortality risk by 2.8 times

    死亡率が2.8倍になる

  • that of a Chernobyl cleanup worker.

    チェルノブイリの清掃作業員の話。

  • So what is happening?

    では、何が起こっているのか?

  • Is nuclear energy dangerous or safe?

    原子力は危険か安全か?

  • - But just before we get to that,

    - しかし、その前に

  • we wanna thank today's sponsor Skillshare.

    本日のスポンサーであるSkillshareに感謝したいと思います。

  • The first 1,000 people to use the link in our description

    私たちの説明文にあるリンクを使用した先着1,000名様

  • get a free trial of Skillshare premium membership.

    スキルシェアのプレミアム会員の無料体験ができます。

  • So go check it out because it goes fast.

    すぐになくなってしまうので、ぜひチェックしてみてください。

  • Skillshare's actually how I improved

    スキルシェアのおかげで上達しました

  • my own animation skills to animate this channel

    このチャンネルをアニメ化するための自分のアニメーション技術

  • with Greg's drawings.

    グレッグの絵と一緒に

  • I also taught myself Photoshop using Skillshare.

    PhotoshopもSkillshareを使って独学で学びました。

  • And it's just an amazing way to continue

    そして、それは継続するための素晴らしい方法なのです。

  • to learn and grow your brain.

    を学び、脳を成長させることができます。

  • - Skillshare is an online learning community

    - Skillshareは、オンライン学習コミュニティです。

  • with thousands of classes for curious and creative people.

    好奇心旺盛でクリエイティブな人々のための何千ものクラスがあります。

  • You can explore new skills or deepen current passions.

    新しいスキルを探求したり、現在の情熱を深めたりすることができます。

  • Like this course that I took for beginner birders,

    私が受講した初心者向けのバードウォッチングコースのように。

  • where it actually taught me

    実際に学んだこと

  • to correctly identify mourning doves.

    鳩を正しく識別するために

  • It was so exciting.

    とてもエキサイティングでした。

  • It turns out that their wings make a specific type of noise.

    その結果、彼らの翼が特定の音を出すことがわかりました。

  • Eek!

    Eek!

  • I'm obsessed with birding.

    私はバードウォッチングに夢中です。

  • Or this class about electricity generation,

    あるいは、発電に関するこの授業。

  • where you can take a deep dive

    深く潜ることができる場所

  • into solar, wind, and nuclear energy.

    太陽エネルギー、風力エネルギー、原子力エネルギーに

  • And actually understand the physics

    そして、実際に物理を理解する

  • and mechanics of generating this electricity.

    そして、その電気を生み出すための仕組み。

  • This was integral for me making this video

    このビデオを作る上で欠かせないものでした。

  • - It's curated specifically for learning,

    - 学習用に特別にキュレーションされています。

  • meaning that there are no ads.

    つまり、広告がないということです。

  • And they're always launching new premium classes.

    また、常に新しいプレミアムクラスを導入しています。

  • At the cost of $10 a month with an annual subscription,

    年間契約で月に10ドルのコストで。

  • which is amazing.

    というのはすごいですね。

  • - So you can help our show

    - 私たちの番組に協力してください。

  • by clicking the link in the description.

    説明文中のリンクをクリックしてください。

  • And the first 1,000 people will get

    また、先着1,000名様には

  • a free trial of premium membership.

    プレミアム会員を無料でお試しいただけます。

  • This genuinely is how you guys can support us

    純粋に、皆さんが私たちをサポートしてくれる方法です。

  • here at ASAP Science.

    ここASAP Scienceでは

  • Now let's get back to the core of this video,

    さて、今回のビデオの核心に戻りましょう。

  • about the nuclear reactor's core.

    原子炉の炉心について。

  • These reactors use low enriched uranium

    これらの原子炉は、低濃縮ウランを使用します。

  • and controlled chain reactions to heat pressurized water,

    と、加圧された水を加熱するための連鎖反応を制御しています。

  • which in turn heats other water in a secondary circuit

    その結果、二次回路で他の水を加熱することができます。

  • that causes steam to rotate a turbine,

    蒸気でタービンを回転させるための

  • which is linked to a generator that creates electricity.

    それが、電気を作る発電機につながっているのです。

  • Cool water from a river or ocean can be pumped in

    川や海の冷たい水を汲み上げることができる

  • to cool the water in the secondary circuit.

    を使って、2次回路の水を冷やしています。

  • Or, sometimes cooling towers are built.

    あるいは、冷却塔を作ることもあります。

  • Like these iconic bad boys

    これらのアイコニックなバッドボーイのように

  • that we all know and love from The Simpsons.

    私たちが知っているシンプソンズでおなじみの

  • - Current research has found that American opinions

    - 現在の研究では、アメリカ人の意見は

  • haven't changed much on nuclear energy since the cold war,

    は、冷戦時代から原子力に関してはあまり変わっていません。

  • which is weird because it feels like culture has shifted.

    これは、文化が変化したように感じられるので、奇妙なことです。

  • Kids no longer learn to hide under their desks

    机の下に隠れることを覚えなくなった子供たち

  • in preparation for nuclear war.

    核戦争に備えて

  • Now they learned to hide under their desks

    机の下に隠れることを覚えた

  • for preparation of a mass shooter.

    集団暴行事件の準備のために

  • In fact, 54% of Americans still oppose nuclear energy today.

    実際、現在でも54%のアメリカ人が原子力発電に反対しています。

  • So let's talk nuclear power plant safety.

    そこで、原子力発電所の安全性についてお話します。

  • A Harvard study found that newer generations

    ハーバード大学の研究によると、新しい世代は

  • of nuclear reactors, particularly what is called

    原子炉の、特にいわゆる

  • pebble-bed reactors, are designed so that

    ペブルベッド型原子炉の設計ではは

  • the nuclear chain reaction cannot run away

    逃げることのできない核の連鎖反応

  • and cause a meltdown.

    で、メルトダウンを起こしてしまいます。

  • Even in the event of a complete failure

    完全に故障してしまった場合でも

  • of the reactor's machinery.

    炉の機械の

  • And that with the advent of modern reactors,

    それも、近代的な原子炉の出現によって。

  • such as the pebble-bed reactor,

    ペブルベッド・リアクターなど。

  • and careful selection of plant sites,

    と工場の場所を慎重に選ぶことが必要です。

  • nuclear accidents like the one in Fukushima

    福島のような原発事故

  • are actually not possible.

    は、実際には不可能です。

  • But some people think that emphasizing safety

    しかし、安全性を重視することは

  • actually just emphasizes fear.

    実際には恐怖を強調するだけです。

  • Airlines don't advertise how safe they are

    航空会社は安全性を宣伝しない

  • because then you would just be thinking about

    のことを考えているだけになってしまうからです。

  • crashing the whole time you were on the plane.

    飛行機に乗っている間、ずっと墜落していましたね。

  • And the fact that you need to look

    と見る必要があるということです。

  • next to the stranger beside you and be like,

    傍らの見知らぬ人の隣に座って、「おはようございます。

  • I love you, I'm sorry, goodbye.

    愛しています、ごめんなさい、さようなら。

  • While you're screaming, and the plane's shaking,

    あなたが叫んでいる間、飛行機が揺れている間。

  • and you have to cover your head,

    と言って、頭を隠さなければなりません。

  • and apparently your legs break on impact.

    で、衝撃で足が折れてしまうらしいです。

  • - So maybe nuclear energy should use the airline's approach

    - だから、原子力は航空会社のやり方を参考にすべきだと思います。

  • and stop explaining why they're safe,

    そして、なぜ安全なのかを説明するのをやめます。

  • and start unapologetically explaining how great they are.

    そして、自分がいかに素晴らしいかを堂々と説明し始めるのです。

  • Nuclear reactors, such as Diablo Canyon,

    ディアブロキャニオンに代表される原子炉。

  • which will be closed in 2024 due to cost upkeep,

    が、維持費の問題で2024年に閉鎖されることになりました。

  • accounts for roughly 9% of California's energy

    は、カリフォルニア州のエネルギーの約9%を占めています。

  • but occupies fewer than 600 acres.

    しかし、その面積は600エーカーにも満たない。

  • Honestly, that's wowsers to think of that much energy

    正直なところ、それだけのエネルギーを考えるとワタシは

  • coming out of that little Diablo Canyon.

    あの小さなディアブロ・キャニオンから出ている。

  • There are currently 56 nuclear power plants

    現在、56基の原子力発電所があります。

  • operating in the US that provide the country

    米国で活動している企業が、米国で提供している

  • with roughly 20% of the electrical supply.

    電力供給の約20%を占めています。

  • That's more than half of the US's low carbon electricity.

    これは、米国の低炭素電力の半分以上にあたります。

  • The NASA Goddard Institute predicts that

    NASAゴダード研究所の予測によると

  • nuclear power has prevented 1.84 million deaths

    原子力発電は184万人の死を防いだ

  • that would have occurred if the energy

    の場合に発生していたであろう、エネルギー

  • was produced by fossil fuels.

    は化石燃料で作られたものです。

  • This is 370 times more lives saved

    これは370倍の命を救ったことになります。

  • than have been lost to any nuclear power plant issues

    原子力発電所の問題で失われたものよりも

  • in the last 40 years.

    この40年の間に

  • At this point, I feel very lied to.

    この時点で、私はとても騙されていると感じています。

  • But, what about the nuclear waste?

    でも、核廃棄物はどうするの?

  • - 97% of the waste created by nuclear plants

    - 原子力発電所で発生する廃棄物の97%が

  • is classified as low or intermediate level waste.

    は低・中レベルの廃棄物に分類されます。

  • All the nuclear waste in the US is often compared to

    アメリカのすべての核廃棄物は、よく比較されます。

  • the size of a football field piled 50 feet high.

    50フィートの高さに積まれたサッカー場の大きさ。

  • The world nuclear association describes that

    世界原子力協会の説明によると

  • the waste is encapsulated in highly engineered casks,

    廃棄物を高度な技術で作られたキャスクに封じ込めます。

  • in stable vitrified form, and is placed at depths

    安定したガラス化された状態で、深さ

  • well below the biosphere.

    バイオスフィアのはるか下にある。

  • Such long-term geological storage solutions

    このような長期地中貯留ソリューション

  • are designed to prevent any movement

    は一切の動きがないように設計されています。

  • of radioactivity for thousands of years.

    の放射能を何千年にもわたって維持することができます。

  • So even in the event of an earthquake or a natural disaster

    そのため、地震や自然災害が発生した場合でも

  • these repositories will keep the waste

    これらのリポジトリでは、廃棄物を

  • from reaching the surface and releasing radiation.

    が表面に到達して放射線を放出するのを防ぐためです。

  • In addition, 96% of this waste can be recycled

    また、この廃棄物の96%はリサイクルが可能です。

  • to make new fuel and byproducts.

    を使って、新しい燃料や副産物を作ることができます。

  • - So the nuclear power industry

    - だから、原子力発電産業は

  • puts their waste in monitored concrete casks,

    廃棄物をモニター付きのコンクリートキャスクに入れています。

  • deep into the ground, but the coal, oil,

    地面の奥深くにある石炭や石油を

  • and natural gas industries release their waste

    と天然ガス産業が廃棄物を放出しています。

  • into the atmosphere.

    を大気中に放出します。

  • Where it causes pollution

    汚染の原因となる場所

  • and kills thousands of people a year,

    で、年間何千人もの人が亡くなっています。

  • and like all the birds.

    と、すべての鳥たちのように。

  • And these greenhouse gases contribute to

    そして、これらの温室効果ガスは

  • the sixth largest mass extinction that we are currently in,

    現在、私たちが直面している6番目に大きな大量絶滅の原因です。

  • and to the climate crisis that we are currently in.

    そして、私たちが現在直面している気候変動の危機へ。

  • So is it safe?

    では、安全なのか?

  • Well, nuclear energy is definitely safer

    原子力の方が絶対に安全だと思います。

  • than the fossil fuels that we are addicted to right now.

    今、私たちが夢中になっている化石燃料よりも

  • - The fear of nuclear energy is getting in the way

    - 原発への恐怖が邪魔をする

  • of us having an honest discussion of how it can work

    どうすればうまくいくのか、正直に話し合ってみたいと思います。

  • with renewable energy to get us to a zero carbon future.

    を再生可能エネルギーで賄い、ゼロカーボンの未来を目指します。

  • As stated, the US gets 20% of its electricity

    述べたように、米国は電力の20%を調達しています。

  • from nuclear power plants.

    原子力発電所からの

  • France gets 70% from nuclear.

    フランスは70%を原子力で賄っています。

  • Impressive research at MIT analyzed 1,000 scenarios

    1,000のシナリオを分析したMITの研究が素晴らしい

  • of getting to our zero carbon future.

    ゼロカーボンの未来に向けての

  • And all the cheapest paths involved nuclear

    そして、すべての安価なパスは、核を含む

  • helping renewable energy, get to where it needs to be.

    再生可能エネルギーが必要なところに到達するのを助ける。

  • - Focusing in on America,

    - アメリカに焦点を当てて

  • there is a scenario where you can get to

    になるというシナリオがあります。

  • a zero carbon future with just renewables

    自然エネルギーだけでゼロカーボンの未来を

  • and leaving the existing nuclear power plants on.

    と言って、既存の原子力発電所を残しています。

  • But this is specific to America

    しかし、これはアメリカに限った話です。

  • because America is rich in renewable energy opportunities.

    なぜなら、アメリカには再生可能エネルギーの機会が豊富にあるからです。

  • It's got the windy Texas, the super sunny California.

    風の強いテキサス、太陽がいっぱいのカリフォルニア。

  • Many other parts of the world do not have the ability

    世界の他の多くの地域では、その能力がありません。