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  • Hi, guys. What's happening? Right now, it's World Cup. Are you watching? I think the world

  • is watching the World Cup.

  • Today, I'm going to teach you about football. Please, please, please, please, please do

  • not call it "soccer". Let's go through this. In Canada and in America, people are quite

  • stupid, including me. For some reason, people like to say "soccer". Let's imagine that we

  • are playing a game with your foot and a ball. Well, I would call that "football". So one

  • rule that I have if you ever meet me is please don't call it "soccer". It's "football". In

  • kind of a slang kind of way, you can call it "footy". It's more British English, but

  • you can call it that just as long as you do not call it "soccer". Please do not call it

  • "soccer". Just to clarify this for you. The organization is called FIFA. What do you think

  • the F stands for? It's not called "SIFA"; it's called "FIFA". It's called "football".

  • So need I remind you; do not say "soccer". Thank you. Public service announcement is

  • now over. Let's get into the game.

  • Maybe you are very excited to watch the game. You are not sure what verb to use in English

  • because we have "look", "see", and "watch". This is easy. Because everyone's running and

  • smashing and biting people -- don't bite people when you play football. You're going to actually

  • watch the football game. So you can say to your friends, "Hey! Let's watch the game."

  • And your friend says, "Yes! Let's do that. I'm excited."

  • So maybe you get to the game late, and the game's already started. So you can say to

  • someone, "What is the score?" Okay? So if it's present tense, we want to use "is" because

  • it's present tense. "What is the score?" Maybe the person will tell you, "It's 2-1 for -- let's

  • say -- Brazil." Hi, everybody from Brazil. This means that Brazil is winning because

  • I tell you the name of the country. I would never tell you the team's losing. Okay? We

  • actually don't have a word for this little hyphen here when we talk about a score. So

  • we say, "It's 2-1 for Japan." Okay? Or, "It's 3-2 for Algeria." If you want to find out

  • the past tense -- maybe you missed the game entirely because you have a job. I have a

  • job. I miss games. So I have to catch up at the end. So you're going to ask your friends

  • or someone, "What was the score?" They will say the same answer except they'll say, "It

  • was -- for example -- 2-1 for Mexico." Okay? Or you could ask the person, "Who won?" They're

  • going to say the country. "Cameroon won 2-0." Okay? Again, we don't have to say this little

  • hyphen thing. Whatever country is the winner -- can someone give me another country name?

  • What's your country name? Is your country in the World Cup? Canada isn't, and I know

  • why. Because in Canada, we don't even know the name of the game. USA was in the World

  • Cup. They got shut out. So, "USA won 2-0." Whatever country's the winner, you have to

  • use the past tense. This is present tense: "win". Past tense is like the number -- exact

  • same way to say it. We say "won". I know the spelling looks strange, but it's actually

  • the same way to say it.

  • What happens in the World Cup -- in the World Cup only -- is they have different groups:

  • A, B, C, D. And when the teams play each other, groups get disqualified. So what happens is

  • in each group, one country will advance. So for example, I can say, "In group A, USA advances."

  • But they didn't, did they? History has been written.

  • If you are with a group of people and they're not wearing any team colors, you can say,

  • "Who are you supporting?" Or, "Who are you going for?" This means, "Who are you cheering

  • for? Who, like -- oh, come on! Go! Oh, I didn't get it." Do you get really excited when you

  • watch your team play? I don't. I don't have a team. Canada doesn't even know how to say

  • the sport correctly.

  • One thing that happens in the World Cup is there are many, many games in one day. Up

  • to three games a day. So you can ask someone, "Who plays today? Who plays tomorrow?" I'm

  • going to come back after I go have half-time and teach you some vocabulary.

  • Okay. I'm back. All right. Part two -- vocabulary. Let's go. "Half-time." I didn't even write

  • down "half-time". "Half-time", as you might be able to imagine, is half of the game. So

  • the game is usually 45 minutes and 45 minutes. And then, you have, I believe, 15 minutes

  • of rest, which is called "half-time". Each section is 45 minutes. However, because of

  • things like fouls or injuries, they're going to do what's called "added time". So "added

  • time" means they're going to put a couple minutes on the end of each half. So the first

  • half-time, maybe there'll be two minutes extra time or added time. Three minutes extra time

  • or added time. When you watch a football game, they don't stop the game. The game is always

  • going. The clock is going. Due to injuries and fouls, people falling, they add time onto

  • the game.

  • So let's go through some scores. We have two words to say the same thing. You can have

  • a "tie" game or a "draw". "Tie game", "draw". This means the score is equal. So for example,

  • one team has 2 -- "It was 2-2." It's a "tie game" or a "draw". If you have a score of

  • "nil-nil" -- it might have been a bit of a boring game for you because no team scored

  • a goal. "Goal!" I'm sure all of you know this word already. There's one really, really famous

  • announcer who always shouts "Goal!" Maybe when your team scores, you yell, "Goal!" "Goal"

  • is obviously someone's got the ball in the net.

  • There's a nasty thing called a "yellow card". And you will see a referee dig deep into his

  • pocket and produce a yellow card. A "yellow card" is like a strike against a player. So

  • the referee has seen the person do something which is illegal or against the rules in the

  • game. Now people do bad things in the game all the time, like biting people. Sometimes,

  • the ref -- or referee -- does not see that. But if the ref does see you do something bad,

  • he will give you a yellow card.

  • Step one is a yellow card. Step two is a red card. "Red card" means you are game over.

  • You are kicked out of the championship. You can no longer play in the World Cup. You get

  • to go home like the Spanish team. Red card, yellow card.

  • Maybe if you get one of these, you will give someone of the opposite time a penalty. A

  • "penalty" is a kick or something that's happened that's bad. So a "penalty" means that you've

  • done something bad, and the other team gets to have a kick against you that might make

  • it very, very easy.

  • "Kick". This is a verb that we use when we talk about the ball. We don't use any other

  • verb except for "kick". So you can say, "He kicked the ball into the net, and he got a

  • goal!"

  • This word, the pronunciation looks a little strange in this, but it's actually just called

  • "foul". So "foul" means you've done something wrong, and maybe the other team will get a

  • kick for you.

  • Here's another nasty, nasty one that's called "offside". I've made a foul. I think I have

  • -- stop the presses. Can you see my English foul? I'll give you a hint. It is a spelling

  • mistake that I have made. Can you spot the spelling mistake? The mistake is -- as I said,

  • my spelling -- there is no 'i' here. I'm such a bad football player and speller. That's

  • okay. We all make mistakes. So let's continue on with the game. So as I told you, a "foul"

  • means you do something bad. Okay?

  • "Offside". This one is a little bit difficult to explain, but I will try my best. This one

  • is also a little confusing when I watch football because I don't know that much about the game.

  • I'm no expert. I'm no hooligan. But I will try. So if you have someone from Team A who

  • is purple, and then, if we have another player from a different country who is going to be

  • Team B, if Team A is the forward or the attacker and Team B is going to be the defender, this

  • is what has to happen. If I am on Team A's side and I'm down here and I kick the ball,

  • when the ball is kicked, I have to be the same distance ahead as my defender. So if

  • you look at it like a line-up -- if this is B and this is A, my team, A, is going to kick

  • me the ball. At the time that the ball is kicked, we must be at the same level. If I

  • am further ahead than my opponent, this is called "offside". Even if my teammate kicks

  • the ball, I get it, and I score a goal, the goal is not counted because I was "offside".

  • So basically, "offside" means that you have to be level, on the same playing field, with

  • your opponent. It's kind of confusing.

  • If you have a foul, you will get what's called a "corner kick". So a "corner kick" happens

  • at the corner, and it's kick -- I release my foot. So corner kicks usually happen always

  • at the corner. And if this is the net, you will get to start here, and you'll get to

  • kick the ball. Hopefully, one of your players will be able to help you and get the ball

  • into the net and goal! Okay?

  • Sometimes people are injured or they have an injury. So this is an adjective. So whatever

  • player, you can say "was" or "is injured." This is a noun, so you can say "Messi" -- is

  • that going to happen? -- "was" -- oh, sorry. "Messi has an injury." So please be careful

  • with -- this one is a noun, and this one is an adjective. So you have to use proper grammar.

  • The person that stands in the net -- Mexico has a very good one of these -- is called

  • "goal keeper" because they keep the goals from coming in. Or in the short form, you

  • could say "goalie". The net -- do you know what the "net" is? It's the big, big, big,

  • big thing where the goal keeper stands in front of and doesn't want the ball to come

  • in.

  • If you've got added time at the end of the game, I think it makes it so much more exciting

  • especially if it is a tie game or if it's nil-nil. And your team is going to get that

  • kick. Your team is going to make it.

  • Now, one thing you have to watch out for -- I don't really see them in the World Cup, but

  • they are pretty, pretty big in England -- are these crazy guys and gals called "hooligans".

  • Say it with me, "hooligans". So you can say, like, "hoo-la-gans". "Hooligans" are crazy,

  • crazy guys that like to go and cause a ruckus at the game. They will fight the other team

  • with violence. Oh, they will be violent. They will cause riots -- riots. They will smash

  • cars. They will hurt other people with weapons. They might just take a hammer and smash your

  • head because you're wearing the wrong jersey. I do not see this -- I've never seen it in

  • the World Cup, but maybe on the streets of Brazil with your army present, they're watching

  • out for these hooligans.

  • So go hard or go home. Support your team. Have fun. The World Cup brings the world together,

  • and it separates us. Have fun. Bye-bye.

Hi, guys. What's happening? Right now, it's World Cup. Are you watching? I think the world

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A2 初級

英語を学ぶ。フットボール語彙 (Learn English: FOOTBALL Vocabulary)

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    Brian に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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