Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • The admission comes from the Book of Isaiah, and it's really a idiom, and the idiom means a permanent memorial.

    入場はイザヤ書から来ていますが、本当に慣用句で、慣用句は永久記念という意味です。

  • This museum cuts into the mountains, and if you look at it, it looks something like a scar in the mountain of Remembrance.

    この博物館は山の中に切り込みが入っていて、見てみると、何か追憶の山の傷跡のようなものがあります。

  • And I think that's what the Holocaust really is in our world.

    そしてそれがホロコーストの本当の姿だと思います。

  • It's this thing and there were many years afterwards, but we remain with a sort of a scar.

    これはこれで、その後も何年もあったのですが、ある種の傷跡が残っています。

  • It's a bit shocking as you walk in and you see these massive swastikas.

    中に入ると巨大な鉤十字があり、ちょっとショックです。

  • I think it's the flags.

    旗のせいだと思います。

  • But again, this is showing you something about what this period is.

    しかし、繰り返しになりますが、これはこの時代が何なのかを示しています。

  • I mean, you have to.

    つまり、そうしなければならない。

  • You can't just enter it like you enter a swimming pool slowly, you kind of dive into the period.

    プールにゆっくり入るような感覚で入るのではなく、時代に合わせて飛び込むような感覚で入るんですね。

  • Where are these bricks from?

    このレンガはどこから来たの?

  • Well, this is a recreation of a street called Latino Street, which was the main artery in the ghetto Warsaw ghetto, the biggest of the ghettos.

    まあ、これはゲットー・ワルシャワのゲットーの中でも最大の大動脈だったラティーノ通りと呼ばれる通りを再現したものです。

  • And these are actual bricks that were used in the streets of Warsaw, along with the tram line that was there.

    そして、これは実際にワルシャワの街中で使われていたレンガで、そこにあった路面電車の線路と一緒に使われていました。

  • What do you want people to feel when they start walking into the ghetto?

    ゲットーに入り始めた人に何を感じてほしいのか?

  • We want them to have a small feeling maybe, of what crowded nous is and when they see the photos around to understand something about the suffering.

    私たちは、混雑したヌーとは何かということを少しでも感じてもらいたいし、周りの写真を見たときに、その苦しみについて何かを理解してもらいたいと思っています。

  • Because if you see the photos around you, you see tremendous suffering, especially if Children we're talking about people.

    周りの写真を見れば、とてつもない苦しみを目の当たりにすることができるからです。特に子供たちが人間のことを言っているのであれば。

  • Knowing their names is important.

    名前を知ることは大切なことです。

  • When you see their faces, you understand even more that we're talking about, not six million.

    彼らの顔を見れば、600万じゃなくて、600万の話をしていることがさらに理解できる。

  • Some things.

    いくつかのこと。

  • We're talking about six million human beings, each with a family with a background, with something about them that's very human.

    600万人の人間の話をしていますが、それぞれに背景のある家族がいて、何か人間らしいものを持っています。

  • The suitcases are left with names and addresses and information.

    スーツケースには名前や住所などの情報が残されています。

  • Again, it's a personal thing.

    繰り返しになりますが、個人的なことです。

  • Who doesn't understand traveling with a suitcase, so their heart rendering these things.

    誰がスーツケースで旅行を理解していないので、これらのことをレンダリング彼らの心。

  • When you look at the items and you tie them to the story, you don't need to show photographs of atrocities to understand an atrocity.

    アイテムを見てストーリーに結びつけると、残虐行為の写真を見せなくても残虐行為を理解できるようになります。

  • Things were taken from them again, and shoes and shoes.

    またもや物が取り上げられ、靴や靴。

  • Okay, shoes look innocuous.

    靴は無害に見える

  • What?

    何だと?

  • Our shoes.

    私たちの靴。

  • But understand who shoes these were and what happened to the owners of these shoes, and you begin to get something about a feeling of amount, of quantity, of, of everything that's going on here.

    しかし、これらの靴が誰の靴であったかを理解し、これらの靴の所有者に何が起こったのかを理解し、量の感覚について何かを得始めます。

  • You can touch things here.

    ここでは物を触ることができます。

  • You can experience things in a different way.

    いろいろな経験をすることができます。

  • What is this?

    これは何ですか?

  • Well, look in the photograph.

    写真を見て

  • This is a camp called Floss Enberg, where people were working in hard labor, digging out stones, and they were filling carts.

    ここはフロスエンベルグというキャンプで、重労働で石を掘ったり、カートに詰めたりしていたそうです。

  • Right.

    そうだな

  • And this is one of the carts.

    そして、これがカートの一つ。

  • There are 1000 points of proof, 1000 things that you can experience here to show you a little bit.

    証明のポイントが1000個、ここで体験できることが1000個あるので、少しだけご紹介します。

  • Just a tad of what life was like.

    人生がどんなものだったのか、ほんの少しだけ。

  • Ultimately, we want people to understand that the Holocaust was caused by people.

    最終的には、ホロコーストの原因は人にあるということを理解してもらいたいのです。

  • It wasn't a cosmic event, and it wasn't monsters.

    宇宙的な出来事でもないし、モンスターでもない。

  • It was human beings who were motivated by ideas more than anything else.

    何よりもアイデアに突き動かされるのが人間だった。

  • And they brought about this Holocaust.

    そして、彼らはこのホロコーストをもたらした。

  • Which means we need to understand what those ideas were, what was motivating them, what brought them into this?

    つまり、私たちはそれらの考えが何であったのか、何が彼らを動かしたのか、何が彼らをここに連れてきたのかを理解する必要があるということです。

  • Because ultimately, we want to learn from the Holocaust from other genocides.

    なぜなら、最終的には他の大虐殺からホロコーストから学びたいからです。

  • How do we go about preventing anything like this from happening to anyone anywhere else?

    このようなことが他の誰にも起こらないようにするにはどうしたらいいのでしょうか?

The admission comes from the Book of Isaiah, and it's really a idiom, and the idiom means a permanent memorial.

入場はイザヤ書から来ていますが、本当に慣用句で、慣用句は永久記念という意味です。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 CNN10 ホロコースト 理解 ワルシャワ 写真 カート

イスラエル国立ホロコースト記念館を見学 (Touring Israel's National Holocaust Remembrance Site)

  • 4 1
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 03 月 04 日
動画の中の単語