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  • What's up everyone? Today we're learning 5 more  real British accents that you need to know!

  • In case you missed it, we made this lesson not so  long ago, which I highly recommend you watch if  

  • you haven't seen it, and I'll link it down in  the description box below to make it easy for  

  • you to find. Due to that lesson's popularity and  the many requests we've had today you're going to  

  • be learning the Yorkshire accent, the Queen's  English, the Cockney accent, a Scouse accent,  

  • which is from Liverpool, and also a Scottish oneSo first of all we're going to travel to South  

  • Yorkshire and in fact we're going to Doncasteror as they would say Doncaster, because they don't  

  • pronounce this long R sound like I do. And we're  going to be taking a look at the accent of Louis  

  • Tomlinson. Let's take a look at this clip and then  we'll talk about some more features of the accent

  • So the first interesting thing to note here is the  way that we pronounce his name. Because it could  

  • be pronounced in two different ways some people  might say Louis and some people might say Loo-ee,  

  • and that's how he pronounces his. By the wayin case you're new here we help you to learn  

  • fast English without getting lost, without  using the jokes, and without subtitles,  

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  • There are some very distinctive parts to this  South Yorkshire accent which we'll hear in a  

  • moment with one of Louis interviews. Howeverone thing in particular is the way that they  

  • connect some words, so they have quite a precise  connected speech in Yorkshire, where they link  

  • some words together. For example instead of saying  "I'm going to the shop," they'll say "I'm going  

  • to shop," and you'll hear Louis here as well  say something about when he was with the band,  

  • he doesn't say with the band, he says wit band. So this is quite an interesting part of their  

  • accent, so in this interview we hear the  reduction of the 'th' sound so instead  

  • of saying 'everything' or 'throw', Louis  actually says 'everything' and 'throw'. 

  • We also noticed the reduction of the H herewhich can be found in many British accents,  

  • so instead of saying 'he' he might say 'ee',  and instead of saying 'who' he says 'ooh'. 

  • In this interview we have further examples  of the reduction of the H and we also have  

  • the Glottal T. So the Glottal T is  when you don't hear the T in words,  

  • but instead the flow of air is stopped and  then released. So for example instead of  

  • saying 'butter' some people might say 'butter', so  there is a sound there but you don't hear the T. 

  • We also hear that shorter 'uh' sound here with the  U, so instead of saying 'bug', Louis says 'boog',  

  • and this is very typical of Northern accents. You may remember this from the lesson that we  

  • made on Harry Styles accent, so if you haven't  watched that yet, I highly recommend you do,  

  • and you can click up here or down in the  description box below to watch it later

  • Now the way he says this phrase is very  interesting. So he doesn't say 'have got them',  

  • so we have a reduction of the H sound  here, we have a Glottal T and we also  

  • have a reduction of the 'th' sound in them. So  instead of saying 'have got them', Louis says

  • In this clip we again have the reduction  of the H, that short 'uh' sound and the  

  • reduction of the 'th' sound. However we  also hear him use 'me' instead of 'my

  • So instead of saying "I think my mum did a good  job," he says "I think 'me' mum did a good job

  • And again this is very typical of Northern  English accents. We also hear a short E sound  

  • at the end of words that end with Y, so instead  of saying 'personally' he says 'personally'. 

  • So this is very common of Northern accents  in England, with words that end in Y,  

  • such as really, personally and probably. If you'd like to improve your understanding  

  • of fast speaking natives, then I highly recommend  our Fluent with Friends course. In this 48-week  

  • course you'll learn with the first two seasons of  Friends. You'll receive PDF Power lessons every  

  • week, vocabulary memorization software, access  to our Fluency Circle Global Community and so  

  • much more. And the best part is you can try right  now absolutely FREE with our 3-Part Masterclass!  

  • All you have to do is click up  here or down in the description  

  • box below to learn more and sign up now. So now we're going to travel a bit further South  

  • to London where the Queen lives, in  Buckingham Palace, and we're going to  

  • take a little look at how the Queen speaks. So the Queen has kind of her own style of RP  

  • which is Received Pronunciation, and this type of  accent is not spoken by a large percentage of the  

  • population. It's actually a very small percentage  and it's synonymous with class. So it's usually  

  • the upper classes that would speak this way and  also the BBC. It's known as the BBC English.

  • So you'll notice that when the Queen speaks  her jaw is very stiff, so there's not a lot  

  • of movement around her mouth and her  lips also stay quite close together.  

  • One of the best ways to understand natives is  by learning connected speech and many people  

  • are quite surprised to hear that even the  Queen sometimes speaks with connected speech

  • So you can hear here the way that she  says 'isn't' it is quite different and  

  • she links those two words together to  make it more natural as she speaks

  • We also have some linking here where she says  "wore it," so that final sound, that R sound  

  • links to it and it sounds like "wore it, wore it." Now one very distinctive sound that the Royal  

  • Family has, is the way they say 'off', the way  they say the O sound. So I say it like this 'off'  

  • or 'often', however they say it with an  Uh sound, so they will say 'oof' or 'ofn'. 

  • It's very interesting the way that the queen says  "yes" as well and there's this really funny clip  

  • where Olivia Colman, who plays the Queen in the  series The Crown, actually teaches someone how to  

  • say yes as the Royal Family, and as the Queen. If you'd like to learn English with Queen  

  • Elizabeth II, and more about her pronunciationthen I highly recommend you check out this lesson  

  • we made by clicking up here or down in the  description box below. So now we're staying  

  • in London, but we're going towards the East of  London to learn more about the Cockney accent with  

  • David Beckham. So David Beckham was born and grew  up in an area of East London called Leytonstone.  

  • So he does have quite a Cockney accent. In particular we see the reduction of the TH  

  • sound again like we did in Louis Tomlinson's  accent and it sounds more like a F sound

  • So, in words such as 'father', 'with' and  'everything' we hear David Beckham saying it  

  • with more of a F or a V sound. We can also hear  again the reduction of the H and the Glottal T,  

  • which is very typical of the Cockney accent. Another sound that you'll hear with the Cockney  

  • accent is that at the end of words when  there's an '-ing' sometimes it changes  

  • to a '-ink' sound. So instead of saying  'everything' here David says 'everything'. 

  • As we've spoken about this before, natives  make mistakes too and this is a very common one  

  • so instead of saying were he  says was in these sentences

  • Now the very talented singer Adele is also  known for her very strong Cockney accent, so  

  • have a watch and see if there are any features of  the Cockney accent you can hear in hers as well

  • So now we're going to travel all the way up  North to Scotland, and in particular Perth  

  • where the famous actor Ewan McGregor is from. Now the Scottish accent is a rhotic one, meaning  

  • that the R sound is pronounced in most words. So you might notice that it sounds a little bit  

  • more like the way they pronounce the R sound in  American English as opposed to British English.  

  • The O sound as well is quite different in  his accent, it's elongated and it's more  

  • at the front of the mouth. So instead  of saying "I know," it has more of an  

  • elongated sound and is at the front of the mouth. There's also some connected speech here in the way  

  • that he says suppose. He shortens it to spose. So  instead of saying "I suppose," he says "I spose." 

  • Now Ewan McGregor is a very famous hollywood  actor and he's made very many movies there,  

  • so his accent has been influenced a little bit by  this and you'll notice that he does tend to use  

  • the tap tea quite a lot. So although he does also  pronounce his T's you'll also hear his tongue hit  

  • the roof of his mouth there with the American T. So now we're going to travel down just a little  

  • bit to Liverpool, and Liverpool has such  a distinctive accent. It's actually only  

  • around 30 miles from Manchester, but  the two accents are very different

  • So we are going to be taking an interview with  Stephen Graham, who is a famous Hollywood actor  

  • and you might actually not even realize that  he's from Liverpool because he often plays  

  • characters that are from America. And  his American accent is incredible.

  • So we call this accent the Scouse accentwhich comes actually from a dish a type of  

  • stew that was eaten by sailors down at the docksSo their accent is also heavily influenced by the  

  • Irish because it's very close by, and  during the 19th and 20th Centuries  

  • there were many Irish settlers. So this can be  one of the most difficult accents to understand  

  • even for people from other parts of the UK because  there's a lot of connected speech involved.

  • The T's are quite distinctive, especially at the  end of words and they just link to the next words.  

  • So they do speak quite fast and it can be quite  difficult to decipher what someone is saying.  

  • You'll also hear the rolling of theespecially at the end of words and then  

  • again that links to the next one. So instead  of saying 'our house' here he says "ourouse." 

  • So if you've never heard this before you  might actually not even understand what  

  • words he is saying at all. We also have the  reduction of the H again so as you can tell  

  • this is typical of many accents around the UKand when he says "right across here," that T  

  • at the end rolls into the next one, so just  have a little listen again to how this sounds

  • You might also notice that they have a very  distinctive K sound so it's very much at the  

  • back of the throat and it's quite coarse, so when  saying words like 'character' and 'back' it's more  

  • you have that coarse sound so "back." Of course I'm no expert and I'm not  

  • great at doing different accents, so  let's hear it again from Stephen Graham.

  • Another aspect of the Scouse accent is that  that G is dropped at the end of certain words

  • So of the accents that you've learned  today which one do you like the most?  

  • And are there any other British accents  that you would like to be featured?  

  • Let me know down in the comments below and don't  forget that I've linked a lot of lessons down in  

  • the description box below, that you can  check out next, which I highly recommend  

  • you watch. But now it's time to go beyond the  classroom and live your English. Aww yeah!!

What's up everyone? Today we're learning 5 more  real British accents that you need to know!

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5つのイギリスのアクセントを学ぼう - ルイ・トムリンソン、デビッド・ベッカムなど! (Learn These 5 British Accents - Louis Tomlinson, David Beckham and more!)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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