Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

AI 自動生成字幕
  • Transcriber: Joseph Geni Reviewer: Camille Martínez

    書き起こし者ジョセフ・ジェニ レビュアーカミーユ・マルティネス

  • In 1987, a Chilean engineer named Oscar Duhalde

    1987年、チリのエンジニア、オスカー・デュハルデが

  • became the only living person on the planet

    ひとりぼっちになった

  • to discover a rare astronomical event

    珍しい天体を発見する

  • with the naked eye.

    肉眼で

  • Oscar was a telescope operator at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.

    オスカーはチリのラス・カンパナス天文台で望遠鏡のオペレーターをしていました。

  • He worked with the astronomers who came to the observatory for their research,

    研究のために天文台に来た天文学者たちと一緒に仕事をしていた。

  • running the telescopes and processing the data that they took.

    望遠鏡を稼働させ、撮影したデータを処理しています。

  • On the night of February 24th,

    2月24日の夜に

  • Oscar stepped outside for a break

    オスカーは休憩のために外に出た

  • and looked up at the night sky and he saw this.

    と夜空を見上げると、彼はこれを見た。

  • This is the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    これが大マゼラン雲です。

  • It's a satellite galaxy very near our own Milky Way.

    私たちの天の川銀河のすぐ近くにある衛星銀河です。

  • But on that February night,

    しかし、その2月の夜に

  • Oscar noticed that something was different about this galaxy.

    オスカーは、この銀河の何かが違うことに気づいた。

  • It didn't quite look like this.

    こんな感じではありませんでした。

  • It looked like this.

    こんな感じでした。

  • Did you see it?

    見ましたか?

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • A small point of light had appeared in one corner of this galaxy.

    この銀河の片隅に小さな光の点が現れた。

  • So to explain how amazing it is that Oscar noticed this,

    だから、オスカーがそれに気づいたことがどれだけすごいことかを説明するために。

  • we need to zoom out a bit

    もう少し拡大して

  • and look at what the southern sky in Chile looks like.

    とチリの南の空の様子を見てみましょう。

  • The Large Magellanic Cloud is right in the middle of that image,

    その画像のちょうど真ん中に大マゼラン雲があります。

  • but despite its name, it's really small.

    が、名前とは裏腹に本当に小さい。

  • Imagine trying to notice one single new point of light

    新しい光の一点に気づくことを想像してみてください。

  • appearing in that galaxy.

    その銀河系に現れた

  • Oscar was able to do this

    オスカーはこんなことができました

  • because he had the Large Magellanic Cloud essentially memorized.

    彼は大マゼラン雲を本質的に覚えていたからだ。

  • He had worked on data from this galaxy for years,

    彼は何年もこの銀河のデータに取り組んでいました。

  • poring over night after night of observations

    夜を徹して観察

  • and doing it by hand,

    と手探りでやっています。

  • because Oscar had begun his work in astronomy

    オスカーは天文学の仕事を始めていたから

  • at a time when we stored all of the data that we observed from the universe

    宇宙から観測したデータをすべて保存していた頃

  • on fragile sheets of glass.

    壊れやすいガラス板に

  • I know that today's theme is "Moonshot,"

    今日のテーマは「ムーンショット」ですね。

  • and as an astronomer, I figured I could start us out nice and literally,

    天文学者として、私は考えました。私は、私たちを始めることができると考えていました。

  • so here's a shot of the Moon.

    月の写真です。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • It's a familiar sight to all of us, but there's a couple of unusual things

    誰もが見慣れた光景ですが、珍しいものがいくつかあります。

  • about this particular image.

    この特定の画像について。

  • For one, I flipped the colors.

    一つは、色を反転させてみた。

  • It originally looked like this.

    元々はこんな感じでした。

  • And if we zoom out, we can see how this picture was taken.

    そして、拡大してみると、この写真がどのように撮られたのかがわかります。

  • This is a photograph of the Moon taken in 1894

    これは1894年に撮影された月の写真です。

  • on a glass photographic plate.

    ガラスの写真プレートに

  • This was the technology that astronomers had available for decades

    これは、天文学者が何十年も前から持っていた技術です。

  • to store the observations that we took of the night sky.

    を使って、夜空の観測を保存します。

  • I've actually brought an example of a glass plate to show you.

    実際にガラスのお皿の例を持ってきてお見せしています。

  • So this looks like a real secure way to store our data.

    これは本当に安全にデータを保存する方法のようですね。

  • These photographic plates were incredibly difficult to work with.

    これらの写真プレートは、信じられないほど作業が大変でした。

  • One side of them was treated with a chemical emulsion that would darken

    片方は化学乳剤で処理されていて黒くなります

  • when it was exposed to light.

    光を浴びると

  • This is how these plates were able to store the pictures that they took,

    このようにして、これらのプレートは撮影した写真を保存することができました。

  • but it meant that astronomers had to work with these plates in darkness.

    しかし、それは天文学者が暗闇の中でこれらのプレートを使って仕事をしなければならないことを意味していました。

  • The plates had to be cut to a specific size

    プレートは特定のサイズにカットする必要がありました。

  • so that they could fit into the camera of a telescope.

    望遠鏡のカメラに収まるように。

  • So astronomers would take razor-sharp cutting tools

    だから天文学者は 鋭利な刃物を持っていく

  • and slice these tiny pieces of glass,

    と、この小さなガラスの破片をスライスします。

  • all in the dark.

    全てが暗闇の中で

  • Astronomers also had all kinds of tricks that they would use

    天文学者はまた、彼らが使用するすべての種類のトリックを持っていた

  • to make the plates respond to light a little faster.

    プレートが光に反応するのを少し早くします。

  • They would bake them or freeze them, they would soak them in ammonia,

    焼いたり凍らせたり、アンモニアに浸したりしていました。

  • or they'd coat them with lemon juice --

    レモン汁をかけたりして

  • all in the dark.

    全てが暗闇の中で

  • Then astronomers would take these carefully designed plates

    そうすると、天文学者たちは、これらの慎重に設計されたプレートを手にすることになる。

  • to the telescope

    望遠鏡に

  • and load them into the camera.

    とカメラに読み込ませます。

  • They had to be loaded with that chemically emulsified side pointed out

    化学的に乳化した側から指摘されたものを搭載しなければならなかった。

  • so that the light would hit it.

    光が当たるように

  • But in the dark, it was almost impossible to tell which side was the right one.

    しかし、暗闇の中では、どちらが正しいのか、ほとんどわからない状態でした。

  • Astronomers got into the habit of tapping a plate to their lips,

    天文学者たちは、皿を唇に叩きつける習慣を身につけた。

  • or, like, licking it, to see which side of the plate was sticky

    どっちがべたべたしているかなとか

  • and therefore coated with the emulsion.

    であり、したがって、乳剤でコーティングされている。

  • And then when they actually put it into the camera,

    そして、実際にカメラに入れてみると

  • there was one last challenge.

    最後の挑戦があった

  • In this picture behind me,

    私の後ろのこの写真では

  • you can see that the plate the astronomer is holding

    天文学者が持っている皿が見える

  • is very slightly curved.

    は非常にわずかに湾曲しています。

  • Sometimes plates had to be bent to fit into a telescope's camera,

    望遠鏡のカメラに収まるようにプレートを曲げなければならないこともありました。

  • so you would take this carefully cut, meticulously treated, very babied plate

    丁寧にカットされた、細心の注意を払って処理された、非常に赤ちゃんのようなお皿を持っていく

  • up to a telescope, and then you'd just ...

    望遠鏡まで行って

  • So sometimes that would work. Sometimes they would snap.

    時にはそれがうまくいくこともあった。時には折れることもあった

  • But it would usually end with the [plate] loaded into a camera

    しかし、それは通常、カメラに装填された「プレート」で終わるだろう。

  • on the back of a telescope.

    望遠鏡の背面に

  • You could then point that telescope

    望遠鏡を向けることができます

  • to whatever patch of sky you wanted to study,

    勉強したい空の部分に行ってみましょう

  • open the camera shutter,

    カメラのシャッターを開ける

  • and begin capturing data.

    をクリックして、データの取り込みを開始します。

  • Now, astronomers couldn't just walk away from the camera

    天文学者はカメラから離れられなくなった

  • once they'd done this.

    彼らがこれをやってしまったら

  • They had to stay with that camera for as long as they were observing.

    彼らは観察している間はずっとそのカメラを持っていなければなりませんでした。

  • This meant that astronomers would get into elevators

    これは、天文学者がエレベーターに乗り込むことを意味します。

  • attached to the side of the telescope domes.

    望遠鏡ドームの側面に取り付けられている。

  • They would ride the elevator high into the building

    エレベーターに乗ってビルの中へ

  • and then climb into the top of the telescope

    と、望遠鏡の上に登っていきます。

  • and stay there all night shivering in the cold,

    そして、寒さに震えながら一晩中そこにいる。

  • transferring plates in and out of the camera,

    プレートをカメラに出し入れします。

  • opening and closing the shutter

    シャッター開閉

  • and pointing the telescope to whatever piece of sky

    望遠鏡を何かの空に向けて

  • they wanted to study.

    勉強したいと言っていました。

  • These astronomers worked with operators who would stay on the ground.

    これらの天文学者は、地上に留まるオペレーターと一緒に仕事をしていました。

  • And they would do things like turn the dome itself

    そして、彼らはドーム自体を回すようなことをするだろう

  • and make sure the rest of the telescope was running.

    と、望遠鏡の残りの部分が動いていることを確認してください。

  • It was a system that usually worked pretty well,

    普段は結構効くシステムでした。

  • but once in a while, things would go wrong.

    でも、たまにはうまくいかないこともあった。

  • There was an astronomer observing a very complicated plate

    非常に複雑なプレートを観測している天文学者がいました。

  • at this observatory, the Lick Observatory here in California.

    カリフォルニアのリック天文台だ

  • He was sitting at the top of that yellow structure

    彼はその黄色い構造物の上に座っていた

  • that you see in the dome on the lower right,

    右下のドームの中にある

  • and he'd been exposing one glass plate to the sky for hours,

    彼は1枚のガラス板を何時間も空に晒していた。

  • crouched down and cold

    しゃがみ込んで冷や冷や

  • and keeping the telescope perfectly pointed

    望遠鏡を完全に向けた状態で

  • so he could take this precious picture of the universe.

    彼はこの貴重な宇宙の写真を撮ることができました。

  • His operator wandered into the dome at one point

    彼のオペレーターはある時点でドームに迷い込んだ

  • just to check on him and see how things were going.

    様子を見に来たんだ

  • And as the operator stepped through the door of the dome,

    オペレーターがドームのドアから足を踏み入れると

  • he brushed against the wall and flipped the light switch in the dome.

    彼は壁にブラシをかけ、ドームの照明のスイッチをひっくり返した。

  • So the lights came blazing on and flooding into the telescope

    望遠鏡の中に光が入り込んできて

  • and ruining the plate,

    とプレートを台無しにしてしまう。

  • and there was then this howl from the top of the telescope.

    そして、望遠鏡の上からこの遠吠えがありました。

  • The astronomer started yelling and cursing and saying,

    天文学者は怒鳴ったり罵ったりして言い始めた。

  • "What have you done? You've destroyed so much hard work.

    "何をしたの?苦労してきたことをぶち壊しにしたのか

  • I'm going to get down from this telescope and kill you!"

    この望遠鏡から降りて殺してやる!"

  • So he then starts moving the telescope

    そこで彼は望遠鏡を動かし始めます

  • about this fast --

    この速さについて

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • toward the elevator

    エレベーターに向かって

  • so that he can climb down and make good on his threats.

    降りてきて、脅しを晴らすように。

  • Now, as he's approaching the elevator,

    今、エレベーターに近づいたところで

  • the elevator then suddenly starts spinning away from him,

    エレベーターが突然彼から離れて回転を始めました。

  • because remember, the astronomer can control the telescope,

    天文学者が望遠鏡を操作できることを忘れないでください。

  • but the operator can control the dome.

    が、オペレータはドームを制御することができます。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And the operator is looking up, going,

    そして、オペレーターは上を見上げて、行っています。

  • "He seems really mad. I might not want to let him down until he's less murdery."

    "彼は本当に怒っているようだ"彼の殺人が減るまでは 彼を失望させたくないかもしれない"

  • So the end is this absurd slow-motion game of chase

    最後はこの不条理なスローモーションの追撃ゲームなんですね。

  • with the lights on and the dome just spinning around and around.

    ライトが点いていてドームがクルクル回っていて

  • It must have looked completely ridiculous.

    完全にバカバカしく見えたに違いない。

  • When I tell people about using photographic plates to study the universe,

    写真のプレートを使って宇宙を研究することを人に言うと

  • it does sound ridiculous.

    馬鹿げているように聞こえるが

  • It's a little absurd

    それは少し不条理です

  • to take what seems like a primitive tool for studying the universe

    宇宙を研究するための原始的な道具のようなものを手に入れるために

  • and say, well, we're going to dunk this in lemon juice, lick it,

    と言って、まあ、これをレモン汁に浸して舐める。

  • stick it in the telescope, shiver next to it for a few hours

    望遠鏡に突っ込んで数時間横で震える

  • and solve the mysteries of the cosmos.

    と宇宙の謎を解き明かす。

  • In reality, though, that's exactly what we did.

    しかし、現実には、まさにその通りになっています。

  • I showed you this picture before

    前にもこの写真を見せましたが

  • of an astronomer perched at the top of a telescope.

    望遠鏡の頂上に腰掛けている天文学者の写真。

  • What I didn't tell you is who this astronomer is.

    教えていないのは、この天文学者が誰なのかということです。

  • This is Edwin Hubble,

    こちらはエドウィン・ハッブル。

  • and Hubble used photographic plates

    とハッブルは写真版を使用しています。

  • to completely change our entire understanding

    私たちの理解を完全に変えるために

  • of how big the universe is and how it works.

    宇宙がどれだけ大きいか、どのように機能しているかの

  • This is a plate that Hubble took back in 1923

    これはハッブルが1923年に撮影したプレートです。

  • of an object known at the time as the Andromeda Nebula.

    当時アンドロメダ星雲として知られていた天体の

  • You can see in the upper right of that image

    その画像の右上には

  • that Hubble has labeled a star with this bright red word, "Var!"

    ハッブルがこの真っ赤な文字で星にラベルを付けたのは "Var!

  • He's even put an exclamation point next to it.

    隣に感嘆符までつけている。

  • "Var" here stands for "variable."

    ここでの "Var "は "変数 "の略です。

  • Hubble had found a variable star in the Andromeda Nebula.

    ハッブルはアンドロメダ星雲の中に変動星を発見していた。

  • Its brightness changed,

    明るさが変わった。

  • getting brighter and dimmer as a function of time.

    時間の機能として明るくなったり、薄暗くなったりする。

  • Hubble knew that if he studied how that star changed with time,

    ハッブルは、その星が時間とともにどのように変化するかを研究すれば、そのことを知っていました。

  • he could measure the distance to the Andromeda Nebula,

    彼はアンドロメダ星雲までの距離を測ることができました。

  • and when he did, the results were astonishing.

    彼がやったとき、その結果は驚くべきものでした。

  • He discovered that this was not, in fact, a nebula.

    彼は、これが実は星雲ではないことを発見した。

  • This was the Andromeda Galaxy,

    アンドロメダ銀河でした。

  • an entire separate galaxy two and a half million light years

    ばんごうぎんが

  • beyond our own Milky Way.

    私たちの天の川を越えて

  • This was the first evidence of other galaxies

    これは、他の銀河が存在する最初の証拠となった。

  • existing in the universe beyond our own,

    私たちの宇宙を超えて存在している

  • and it totally changed our understanding of how big the universe was

    宇宙の大きさについての理解を完全に変えてくれました

  • and what it contained.

    と何が含まれているかを確認しました。

  • So now we can look at what telescopes can do today.

    そこで、今日は望遠鏡で何ができるのかを見てみましょう。

  • This is a modern-day picture of the Andromeda Galaxy,

    これは現代のアンドロメダ銀河の写真です。

  • and it looks just like the telescope photos

    と望遠鏡の写真と同じように見えます

  • that we all love to enjoy and look at:

    みんなが大好きで見ていて楽しいこと。

  • it's colorful and detailed and beautiful.

    カラフルで細やかで美しいですね。

  • We now store data like this digitally,

    今ではこのようにデジタルでデータを保存しています。

  • and we take it using telescopes like these.

    このような望遠鏡を使用しています。

  • So this is me standing underneath a telescope with a mirror

    これは鏡のある望遠鏡の下に立っている私です。

  • that's 26 feet across.

    それは26フィートの幅だ

  • Bigger telescope mirrors let us take sharper and clearer images,

    大きな望遠鏡の鏡で、よりシャープでクリアな画像を撮影することができます。

  • and they also make it easier for us to gather light

    そして、それらはまた、私たちが光を集めることを容易にしてくれます。

  • from faint and faraway objects.

    かすかに遠くにあるものから

  • So a bigger telescope literally gives us a farther reach

    だから、大きな望遠鏡は、文字通り私たちに遠くに到達することができます。

  • into the universe,

    宇宙の中に

  • looking at things that we couldn't have seen before.

    今まで見られなかったものを見ながら

  • We're also no longer strapped to the telescope

    望遠鏡にも縛り付けられなくなりました

  • when we do our observations.

    私たちが観察をするときに

  • This is me during my very first observing trip

    これは初めての観測旅行中の私です。

  • at a telescope in Arizona.

    アリゾナの望遠鏡で

  • I'm opening the dome of the telescope,

    望遠鏡のドームを開けています。

  • but I'm not on top of the telescope to do it.

    が、それをするために望遠鏡の上には乗っていない。

  • I'm sitting in a room off to the side of the dome,

    ドームの横の部屋に座っています。

  • nice and warm and on the ground

    地に足のついた温かみのある

  • and running the telescope from afar.

    と遠くから望遠鏡を走らせています。

  • "Afar" can get pretty extreme.

    "アファー "はかなり極端になることがあります。

  • Sometimes we don't even need to go to telescopes anymore.

    もう望遠鏡に行かなくてもいいこともあります。

  • This is a telescope in New Mexico that I use for my research all the time,

    いつも研究のために使っているニューメキシコ州の望遠鏡です。

  • but I can run it with my laptop.

    と言っても、ノートパソコンでも実行できるんですけどね。

  • I can sit on my couch in Seattle

    シアトルのソファに座れる

  • and send commands from my laptop

    と私のラップトップからコマンドを送信する

  • telling the telescope where to point,

    望遠鏡をどこに向けるかを伝える

  • when to open and close the shutter,

    シャッターの開閉のタイミング

  • what pictures I want it to take of the universe --

    宇宙のどんな写真を撮って欲しいのか --

  • all from many states away.

    遠く離れた多くの州から

  • So the way that we operate telescopes has really changed,

    望遠鏡の操作方法が本当に変わったんですね。

  • but the questions we're trying to answer about the universe

    しかし、私たちが答えようとしているのは、宇宙についての質問です。

  • have remained the same.

    は変わっていません。

  • One of the big questions still focuses on how things change in the night sky,

    大きな疑問の一つは、今でも夜空の中で物事がどのように変化するかに注目しています。

  • and the changing sky was exactly what Oscar Duhalde saw

    変化する空は、まさにオスカー・デュハルドが見たものだった

  • when he looked up with the naked eye in 1987.

    1987年に裸眼で見上げると

  • This point of light that he saw appearing in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    大マゼラン雲の中に現れたこの光の点は

  • turned out to be a supernova.

    超新星であることが判明しました。

  • This was the first naked-eye supernova

    これが初の裸眼超新星でした。

  • seen from Earth in more than 400 years.

    400年以上前に地球から見た

  • This is pretty cool,

    これはかなりかっこいいですね。

  • but a couple of you might be looking at this image and going,

    でも、この画像を見て行く人もいるかもしれません。

  • "Really? I've heard of supernovae.

    "彡(゚)(゚)「そうなんですか?超新星って聞いたことがあります。

  • They're supposed to be spectacular,

    壮大なものになっているはずです。

  • and this is just like a dot that appeared in the sky."

    "これは空に現れた点のようなものです"

  • It's true that when you hear the description of what a supernova is

    確かに超新星とは何かという記述を聞くと

  • it sounds really epic.

    それは本当に壮大な響きです。

  • They're these brilliant, explosive deaths of enormous, massive stars,

    彼らは、これらの輝かしい、爆発的な巨大な星の爆発的な死を遂げている。

  • and they shoot energy out into the universe,

    エネルギーを宇宙に向けて発射する

  • and they spew material out into space,

    そして、宇宙に物質を噴出させます。

  • and they sound, like, noticeable.

    目立つような音がする

  • They sound really obvious.

    本当に当たり前のように聞こえます。

  • The whole trick about what a supernova looks like

    超新星がどのように見えるかについての全体のトリック

  • has to do with where it is.

    それがどこにあるかに関係しています。

  • If a star were to die as a supernova

    もしも星が超新星として死ぬとしたら

  • right in our backyard in the Milky Way, a few hundred light years away --

    数百光年先の天の川の裏庭にある

  • "backyard" in astronomy terms --

    "天文用語でいうところの「裏庭」--。

  • it would be incredibly bright.

    それは信じられないほど明るいだろう。

  • We would be able to see that supernova at night

    夜になればあの超新星を見ることができるだろう。

  • as bright as the Moon.

    月のように明るい

  • We would be able to read by its light.

    その光で読めるようになります。

  • Everybody would wind up taking photos of this supernova on their phone.

    誰もがこの超新星を携帯電話で撮影することになります。