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  • To be or not to be? [Laughs] Spelling bee. In North America, we have this competition

  • called "spelling bee". It's where children take words -- adults give children words,

  • long words, and the children have to spell them correctly. Now, if you're from Saudi

  • Arabia or Japan or Korea or other countries, right now, you're going, "Oh, my God, no!"

  • Because you have to do this in English, and your alphabet is not ours. Latin speakers

  • tend to go, "Oh, we'll do very well", and you're bad as well. And you want a secret?

  • I'm bad at spelling. So just share it between you and the other hundred thousand people

  • watching this, okay? So I'm bad at spelling. You're bad at spelling. But I have to teach

  • the rules at school, and I do. I actually do. And if you ask me something, I'll tell

  • you the rule. But you might catch me spelling it incorrectly. So this lesson is for you

  • and for me. And I call it Spelling 101.

  • English is not a phonetic language. It makes it very difficult to learn how to spell. So

  • I'm going to give you English or Spelling 101, which are two little rules that will

  • help you spell when dealing with English vowels. "The long and the short of it", I like the

  • call this lesson. It's a joke in there. The long and the short. Whatever. Okay. Let's

  • go to the board.

  • Are you hoping -- and "hope" is when you pray. You know? You say, "Please let me win the

  • lottery. Really. I want to win the lottery. Please let me win the lottery. Please let

  • that beautiful girl think I'm nice. Please let me pass the test. I hope. I hope. I hope.

  • I wish. I pray." Or are you "hopping"? Are you hopping, like boink, boink, boink? Like

  • a little bunny rabbit. Are you hopping? You notice one has a P, and one has two Ps. Some

  • of you would have written this because you'd say, "Well it's more than 'hope'. It's long,

  • right?" Because "hop" looks like this, h-o-p. "Hope" looks like this. And anybody from a

  • natural language would probably say, "Well, E -- this must be the correct one." I would

  • think so. It's the longer word. But not in English, no. We don't work like that. The

  • shorter word gets it, and the longer word gets this. When I was I kid, I was always

  • told: Short words, you double it. That's what it was. Okay. It made sense. But there's something

  • a little more to it, and today, I'm going to make it easy for you.

  • Now, there's a lesson that has been done called "The Magic E". Go check that out. That will

  • help you -- you know, it's a longer lesson that gives you more examples. But just to

  • give you an idea of long versus short, okay? The magic E states this: If you have -- let's

  • look over here. "Wipe", for instance. This is an I, a long vowel sound. There's a consonant

  • and then, an E. If the E is on the end of a word, you have a consonant and then, a long

  • vowel sound. Okay? The E actually causes it to be "wipe", not "wip". Right? So here's

  • how we change it. Because we know this E helps to modify this, we have to drop the E. Okay?

  • Because it's actually silent. You think "wipe", so it looks like this. That's what it looks

  • like. "Wipe", not "why-ppe". Sorry, people from Brazil. No "why-ppe". No "why-ppe" here.

  • Okay? That's part of the problem. Nobody tells you this stuff. But I do. Okay. So it's not

  • "why-ppe" or "ray-tte" or "ho-ppe", just "hope", "rate", and "wipe".

  • Now, the magic E helps us because we see this, and we know it's a long vowel sound. Yay!

  • But when we're adding is it like, "wipes" or "wiping", "rate" or "rated", hoped or hoping,

  • we have to drop that E. We're told, "Drop the E." It's silent. It's not doing anything,

  • anyway. It's like your unemployed brother in your basement. He's not doing anything.

  • Get rid of him. So "wipe" becomes "wiped" or "wiping". Drop the extra E. Not "wipeed".

  • All right? "Rate" becomes "rated". Oops. Sorry. It becomes "rated". Just add the ED. Or "hoping",

  • in the case up there, it becomes "hoping". We get rid of the extra E. We know it's the

  • long vowel because there's only one consonant. Right? One consonant. One consonant. So we

  • know this must be "wiped", "rated", "hoping". It could even be "hoped". "I hoped you would

  • come." Okay? Don't double the consonant. Don't add two E's. It's just single, single. Easy?

  • Easy. The magic E. Now, we know how it creates a sound. And now, we know how to change it.

  • That's the long of it. The long vowel. You like that?

  • Let's go to the short vowel. Ready? Hold on. It's a long walk. The board's long. Okay.

  • Now, we're here. Okay, so we're on the other end of the board. Short vowel syndrome. Well,

  • in North America we have Short Man Syndrome. Why are you looking at me? I'm incredibly

  • tall. Can't you see? Where's the worm? Mr. E is this tall. He's very sad about it. I

  • am of course, taller than E. That's all we need to know. Moving on. Okay. Short Man syndrome.

  • In North America, we say "Short Man Syndrome" -- like Napoleon, if you're small. They say

  • short men like to feel big, so they buy big cars. Okay? They wear big shoes. Okay? Or

  • they wear big clothes to make them seem bigger. Okay? So a short man will make himself try

  • to look bigger to be more impressive. Funny enough, this is what happens with our short

  • vowels. When you have a word that -- like "hop" -- has a shorter vowel sound, like the

  • short man, he doesn't like that "hope" is longer. So he tries to be bigger. So when

  • "hope" adds ING, he goes, "No. I'm not 'hope'. I'm 'hoping'." And he makes more consonants.

  • So when we have a short vowel sound, we double the consonants. So if it ends in a P and this

  • is a short vowel, you've got to double that consonant. Okay?

  • Let's get some more examples because I know it sounds confusing. But look: "ship". It's

  • not "shipe". If you're Scottish, it's "shite". No. It's not "shipe", it's "ship". It's with

  • a short I. So unlike here where it's long and there's no E -- there's no magic E -- we

  • have to add another P. Short vowel syndrome. And you can say, "It was shipped last week."

  • And now, look how big that word is. See? Small. Big. Short to tall. That's good. Okay?

  • What up, pin? A little pin. Very little pin. Not much of a prick to it, is there? Anyway.

  • Listen up. "Pinned". "It was pinned to a shirt." "Pinned." See? Once again, the little short

  • man makes himself big. Short vowel syndrome. And how about this? Well, this is a -- I would

  • say a fitting end to this conversation. You have to double the T. See? "Fit." "Fit", not

  • "fite". "Fite" is different. "Fit". It's "fitting". "Pinned" and "shipped". Compare these ones

  • to these ones. These words are longer [whispers] except this one. Don't look there. But these

  • are longer. One. This is shorter. Short vowel syndrome. You know how it goes, Baby.

  • So simple lesson. The long and the short of it. If it's a long vowel with one consonant

  • and followed by an E -- the magic E -- drop the E, and add on your ending. ING, ED, just

  • add it right on. If it's a short vowel sound with one consonant, double the consonant;

  • then, add on your ending. This doubling of the consonant tells us it's a short sound

  • so we know how to speak. So not only did I teach you spelling, you got pronunciation.

  • Now -- sorry. We have more work to do. I almost forgot. But I haven't.

  • Here are some examples, my little short friend. Let's go to the board. "I ask -- something

  • -- my friend to taste my pie, and he rat -- it the best in the world." If I had rat pie,

  • I would not be happy. So what do you think he said? I think he "asked" my friend to taste

  • my pie, and he ra -- rate. That's a long sound. So we're going to go, "He rated it. Rated

  • it." Okay? "The best in the world."

  • What about the second one? "Was the whip -- cream" -- I've never seen a whip whip cream. But

  • this is different. When you take milk or cream and you do this, it becomes sort of like ice

  • cream. It's called "whipped". There's no whip involved, really. That would be weird.

  • [Makes whipping sounds.] Anyway. So, "Was the whipped cream wip -- up off the floor?" So "whip",

  • "whip". That's short, right? Short. What did we say about the short? Look he's not even

  • happy. He's sad. Yeah. That's right. We're going to make it big. The "whipped" cream.

  • Now, "wipe", I -- that's long. So "wiped" up off the floor. Yeah? I think so, too. I

  • think it was "wiped up off the floor."

  • So that's the long and short of our lesson. But there is one more. Here's the problem.

  • I wasn't going to talk about it because it said -- the message on the board was, "Go

  • to EngVid for the answer." That means you've got to go to the quiz because on the quiz,

  • that question will be there. And then, I'll tell you. But if you don't go, you won't know.

  • So where do you have to go? You have to go to www.engvid.com, "eng" as in "English",

  • "vid" as in "video", where you can see myself, the other teachers, go over this lesson, go

  • check out the magic E, and get the answer to this particular question. And I know you're

  • dying to find out what happened to the beautiful Persian cat. Anyway. E and me gots to go.

  • Have a good day. And see you soon. Okay?

To be or not to be? [Laughs] Spelling bee. In North America, we have this competition

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A2 初級

英語を学ぶ - スペルを上達させるための基本ルール (Learn English - Basic rules to improve your spelling)

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    Lynn に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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