Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

AI 自動生成字幕
  • Transcriber: TED Translators Admin Reviewer: Rhonda Jacobs

    書き起こし者。TED翻訳者管理レビュアー。ロンダ・ジェイコブス

  • John Doerr: Hello, Hal!

    こんにちは、ハル!

  • Hal Harvey: John, nice to see you.

    ハル・ハーヴェイジョン 会えて嬉しいよ

  • JD: Nice to see you too.

    JD:こちらこそよろしく。

  • HH: So John, we've got a big challenge.

    HH:では、ジョン、私たちは大きな課題を抱えています。

  • We need to get carbon out of the atmosphere.

    大気中から炭素を取り出す必要がある。

  • We need to stop emitting carbon,

    炭素を排出するのをやめよう

  • drive it to zero by 2050.

    2050年までにゼロにする

  • And we need to be halfway there by 2030.

    2030年までに半分にする必要があります。

  • Where are we now?

    ここはどこなんだ?

  • JD: As you know, we're dumping 55 billion tons

    JD:ご存じの通り、550億トンを投棄しています。

  • of carbon pollution in our precious atmosphere every year,

    私たちの大切な大気中の炭素汚染を毎年

  • as if it's some kind of free and open sewer.

    まるで自由で開放的な下水道のように

  • To get halfway to zero by 2030,

    2030年までに中途半端にゼロになるために

  • we're going to have to reduce annual emissions

    年間の排出量を減らさないといけない

  • by about 10 percent a year.

    年に約10%の割合で増加しています。

  • And we've never reduced annual emissions in any year

    また、どの年も年間排出量を削減したことはありません。

  • in the history of the planet.

    地球の歴史の中で

  • So let's break this down.

    では、分解してみましょう。

  • Seventy-five percent of the emissions

    排出量の75

  • come from the 20 largest emitting countries.

    排出量の多い20カ国からの参加。

  • And from four sectors of their economy.

    そして、彼らの経済の4つのセクターから。

  • The first is grid.

    1つ目はグリッドです。

  • Second, transportation.

    2つ目は、交通機関。

  • The third from the buildings.

    建物から3つ目。

  • And the fourth from industrial activities.

    そして4つ目は産業活動から。

  • We've got to fix all those, at speed and at scale.

    それらを全てスピードと規模で解決しないといけない。

  • HH: We do.

    HH:私たちはそうします。

  • And matters are in some ways worse than we think and some ways better.

    そして、問題は我々が思っているよりも悪いところもあれば、良いところもあります。

  • Let me start with the worse.

    まず悪い方から始めよう。

  • Climate change is a wicked problem.

    気候変動は邪悪な問題です。

  • And what do I mean by wicked problem?

    そして、邪悪な問題とは何か?

  • It means it's a problem that transcends geographic boundaries.

    地理的な境界を超えた問題だということです。

  • The sources are everywhere, and the impacts are everywhere.

    ソースはどこにでもあるし、影響はどこにでもある。

  • Although obviously some nations have contributed much more than others.

    明らかにいくつかの国が他の国よりもはるかに多くの貢献をしていますが。

  • In fact, one of the terrible things about climate change

    実際、気候変動についての恐ろしいことの一つは

  • is those who contributed least to it will be hurt the most.

    それに最も貢献した人が最も傷つくことになります。

  • It's a great inequity machine.

    すごい不公平感のある機械ですね。

  • So here we have a problem that you cannot solve

    だから、ここでは、あなたが解決できない問題があります。

  • within the national boundaries of one country,

    一国の国境内で

  • and yet international institutions are notoriously weak.

    にもかかわらず、国際機関が弱体化していることはよく知られている。

  • So that's part of the wicked problem.

    それが邪悪な問題の一部なんですね。

  • The second element of the wicked problem is it transcends normal timescales.

    邪悪な問題の第二の要素は、それが通常のタイムスケールを超越していることです。

  • We're used to news day by day,

    連日のニュースにも慣れてきました。

  • or quarterly reports for business enterprises,

    または事業会社向けの四半期報告書。

  • or an election cycle -- that's about the longest we think anymore of.

    または選挙サイクル -- それは私たちがもう考えている中で最も長いものです。

  • Climate change essentially lasts forever.

    気候変動は本質的に永遠に続く。

  • When you put carbon dioxide into the atmosphere,

    二酸化炭素を大気中に入れると

  • it's there, or its impacts are there, for 1,000 years.

    そこにあるか、その影響があるかのどちらかだ、1000年は。

  • It's a gift we keep on giving for our children, our grandchildren

    それは、私たちの子供たち、私たちの孫のために与え続けている贈り物です。

  • and dozens and dozens of generations beyond there.

    そして、そこから先の何十世代も何十世代も。

  • JD: It sounds like a tax we keep on paying.

    JD: それは私たちが払い続ける税金のように聞こえます。

  • HH: Yeah, it is. It is.

    HH: そうですね。そうなんだ。

  • You sin once, you pay forever.

    一度罪を犯せば永遠に償う

  • And then the third element of it being a wicked problem

    そして、それが邪悪な問題であるという第三の要素

  • is that carbon dioxide is embedded in every aspect of our industrial economy.

    二酸化炭素が産業経済のあらゆる側面に組み込まれているということです。

  • Every car, and every truck, and every airplane, and every house,

    車もトラックも飛行機も家も

  • and every electrical socket, and every industrial processes

    そしてあらゆる電気ソケット、あらゆる工業プロセス

  • now emits carbon dioxide.

    が二酸化炭素を排出するようになりました。

  • JD: So what's the recipe?

    JD:で、レシピは?

  • HH: Well, here's the shortcut.

    HH: さて、ここに近道があります。

  • If you decarbonize the grid, the electrical grid,

    脱炭素化すれば、電気網だ。

  • and then run everything on electricity --

    そしてすべてを電気で動かす --

  • decarbonize the grid and electrify everything --

    グリッドを脱炭素化し、すべてのものを電化する--。

  • if you do those two things, you have a zero carbon economy.

    この2つを実行すれば、炭素ゼロの経済が実現します。

  • Now, that would seem like a pipe dream just a few years ago

    ほんの数年前には夢のような話だったが

  • because it was expensive to create a zero-carbon grid.

    なぜなら、ゼロカーボングリッドを作るにはコストがかかるからです。

  • But the prices of solar and wind have plummeted.

    しかし、太陽光や風力の価格は急落しています。

  • Solar's now the cheapest form of electricity on planet earth

    ソーラーは今、地球上で最も安価な電気の形態です。

  • and wind is second.

    と風は二の次。

  • It means now that you can convert the grid to zero-carbon rapidly

    つまり、グリッドを急速にゼロカーボンに変換することができるようになりました。

  • and save consumers money along the way.

    と消費者のお金を節約することができます。

  • So there's leverage.

    レバレッジがあるんですね。

  • JD: Well, I think a key question, Hal, is do we have the technology that we need

    ハル、重要な問題は、我々が必要とする技術を持っているかどうかだと思います。

  • to replace fossil fuels to get this job done?

    この仕事をするために化石燃料を置き換えるのか?

  • And my answer is no.

    私の答えはノーだ

  • I think we're about 70, maybe 80 percent of the way there.

    70%か80%くらいだと思います

  • For example, we urgently need a breakthrough in batteries.

    例えば、バッテリーの突破口が緊急に必要です。

  • Our batteries need to be higher energy density.

    私たちのバッテリーは、より高いエネルギー密度が必要です。

  • They need to have enhanced safety, faster charging.

    彼らは安全性を高め、より速く充電する必要があります。

  • They need to take less space and less weight,

    少ないスペースと軽量化が必要とされています。

  • and above all else, they need to cost a lot less.

    そして何よりもコストを安くする必要があります。

  • In fact, we need new chemistries that don't rely on scarce cobalt.

    実際には、希少なコバルトに頼らない新しい化学物質が必要です。

  • And we're going to need lots of these batteries.

    そして、このバッテリーがたくさん必要になります。

  • We desperately need much more research in clean energy technology.

    クリーンエネルギー技術の研究が必要なのです。

  • The US invests about 2.5 billion dollars a year.

    アメリカは年間約25億ドルを投資しています。

  • Do you know how much Americans spend on potato chips?

    アメリカ人がポテトチップスにいくら使うか知っていますか?

  • HH: No.

    HH: いいえ。

  • JD: The answer is 4 billion dollars.

    JD:答えは40億ドルです。

  • Now, what do you think of that?

    さて、あなたはどう思いますか?

  • HH: Upside down.

    HH: 逆さまにして。

  • But let me press a little further

    しかし、私はもう少し押してみましょう

  • on a question that's fascinated me about the Silicon Valley.

    シリコンバレーに魅せられた質問について

  • So the Silicon Valley is governed by Moore's law,

    シリコンバレーはムーアの法則に支配されているんですね。

  • where performance doubles every 18 months.

    ここでは、パフォーマンスは18ヶ月ごとに2倍になります。

  • It's not really a law, it's an observation,

    法律というよりは、観察ですね。

  • but be that as it may.

    それはそれとして

  • The energy world is governed by much more mundane laws,

    エネルギーの世界は、はるかに俗世の法則に支配されています。

  • the laws of thermodynamics, right?

    熱力学の法則でしょ?

  • It's physical stuff in the economy.

    経済の中では物理的なものです。

  • Cement, trucks, factories, power plants.

    セメント、トラック、工場、発電所。

  • JD: Atoms, not bits.

    JD: ビットではなく、原子です。

  • HH: Atoms, not bits. Perfect.

    HH: ビットではなく原子です。完璧です。

  • And the transformation of big physical things is slower,

    そして、大きな物理的なものの変換が遅くなります。

  • and the margins are worse, and often the commodities are generic.

    とマージンが悪くなり、コモディティはジェネリックであることが多いです。

  • How do we stimulate the kind of innovation in those worlds

    そのような世界のイノベーションをどうやって刺激するか。

  • that we actually need in order to save this planet earth?

    この地球を救うために必要なものは?

  • JD: Well, that's a really great question.

    JD: それは本当に素晴らしい質問ですね。

  • The innovation starts with basic science in research and development.

    イノベーションは研究開発の基礎科学から始まる。

  • And the American commitment to that, while advanced on a global sense,

    そして、そのアメリカのコミットメントは、グローバルな感覚で進めながらも

  • is still paltry.

    は、やはり手薄なのである。

  • It needs to be 10 times higher

    10倍以上にする必要がある

  • than the, say, 2.5 billion per year that we spend on clean energy R and D.

    クリーンエネルギーRとDに費やす年間25億よりも

  • But we need to go beyond R and D as well.

    でも、RやDを超えていくことも必要だと思います。

  • There needs to be a kind of development, a kind of pre-commercialization,

    ある種の開発が必要で、ある種のプレ商業化が必要です。

  • which in the US is done by a group called ARPA-E.

    アメリカではARPA-Eと呼ばれるグループによって行われています。

  • Then there's the matter of forming new companies.

    そうなると、新しい会社を作るという問題が出てきます。

  • HH: Yes.

    HH: はい。

  • JD: And I think entrepreneurial energy is shifting back into that field.

    JD: そして、起業家のエネルギーはその分野に戻ってきていると思います。

  • It's clear that it takes longer and more capital,

    時間がかかるのは明らかだし、資本金も増える。

  • but you can build a really substantial and valuable enterprise or company.

    しかし、あなたは本当に充実した価値ある企業や会社を作ることができます。

  • HH: Yes.

    HH: はい。

  • JD: Tesla's a prime example. Beyond Meat is another one.

    JD: テスラがその代表例ですね。Beyond Meatもその一つです。

  • And that's inspiring entrepreneurs globally.

    そして、それは世界的に起業家を鼓舞しています。

  • But that's not enough.

    でも、それだけでは足りない。

  • I think you need also a demand signal, in the form of policies and purchases,

    政策や買いという形での需要シグナルも必要だと思います。

  • from nations, like Germany did with solar, to go make these markets happen.

    ドイツの太陽光発電のように、これらの市場を実現するために、国から、これらの市場を実現するために行く。

  • And so I'm, at heart, a capitalist.

    だから私は心の底から資本主義者なんだ

  • I think this energy crisis is the mother of all markets.

    このエネルギー危機は全ての市場の母体だと思います。

  • And it will take longer.

    そして、時間がかかります。

  • But the market for electric vehicle batteries -- 500 billion dollars a year.

    しかし、電気自動車用バッテリーの市場は--年間5000億ドル。

  • It's probably another 500 billion dollars if you go to stationary batteries.

    据え置き型のバッテリーに行けば、また5000億はかかるだろうな。

  • I want to tell you another story that involves policy,

    もう一つ、政策を絡めた話をしたいと思います。

  • but importantly, plans.

    しかし、重要なのは計画です。

  • Now, Shenzhen is a city of 15 million people,

    今、深センは1500万人の都市です。

  • an innovative city, in China.

    革新的な都市、中国で。

  • And they decided that they were going to move to electric buses.

    そして、電気バスへの移行を決めたそうです。

  • And so they required all buses be electric.

    それでバスは全て電気式にすることを要求したのです。

  • In fact, they required parking spots have chargers associated with them.

    実際には、彼らは駐車場には、それらに関連付けられた充電器を持っている必要がありました。

  • So today, Shenzhen has 18,000 electric buses.

    だから現在、深センには18,000台の電気バスがある。

  • It has 21,000 electric taxis.

    21,000台の電動タクシーを保有しています。

  • And this goodness didn't just happen.

    そして、この良さは、ただ起こるだけではなかった。

  • It was the result of a thoughtful, written, five-year plan

    それは、考え抜かれた、書かれた、5年間の計画の結果である。

  • that isn't just a kind of campaign promise.

    それはただの選挙公約のようなものではありません。

  • Executing against these plans is how mayors get promoted, or fired.

    これらの計画に反して実行することが、市長が昇進したり解雇されたりする方法です。

  • And so it's really deadly serious.

    だから、本当に致命的に深刻なんです。

  • It has to do with carbon, and it has to do with health, with jobs,

    それは炭素に関係していて、健康や雇用にも関係しています。

  • and with overall economic strength.

    と総合的な経済力を持っています。

  • The bottom line is that China today has 420,000 electric buses.

    要するに、今の中国には42万台の電気バスがあるということです。

  • America has less than 1,000.

    アメリカは10000人にも満たない。

  • So what other national projects are there that you'd like to see?

    では、他に見てみたい国家プロジェクトはありますか?

  • HH: So this is a global effort,

    HH: これは世界的な取り組みなんですね。

  • but not everybody's going to do the same thing,

    とはいえ、誰もが同じことをするわけではありません。

  • or should do the same thing.

    をするか、同じことをする必要があります。

  • Let me start with Norway.

    まずはノルウェーから。

  • A country that happens to be brilliant at offshore oil,

    偶然にも海洋石油に秀でた国。

  • but also understands the consequences of burning more oil.

    しかし、より多くの油を燃やすことの結果も理解しています。

  • They realized they could deploy their skills

    自分たちのスキルを発揮できることに気付いた

  • from their offshore oil development into offshore wind.

    彼らの洋上石油開発から洋上風力へ。

  • It's a big deal to put wind turbines out in the ocean.

    風車を海に出すのは大変なことです。

  • The ocean, the winds are much stronger,

    海、風がかなり強いです。

  • and the winds are much more constant, not only stronger.

    と風が強くなっただけでなく、ずっと一定の風が吹いています。

  • So it balances the grid beautifully.

    だから、グリッドのバランスが見事に取れている。

  • But it's really hard to build things in the deep ocean.

    でも、深海で物を作るのは本当に難しいですよね。

  • Norway's good at it.

    ノルウェーは得意です。

  • So let them take that on.

    だから、彼らにそれをやらせてみてください。