Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • (tribal drum music)

  • - [Narrator] Dinosaurs are awesome.

    - ナレーター】恐竜ってすごいですね。

  • (dinosaur roaring)

    (恐竜の咆哮)

  • We all know it.

    みんな知ってる

  • When we figured out

    突き詰めていくと

  • these guys were a thing,

    こいつらは、昔から存在していたんだ。

  • we wanted more, more fossils, more art, more, well,

    もっと、もっと化石が欲しかった、もっと芸術が欲しかった、もっと、もっと、まあ。

  • whatever this is.

    これが何であれ

  • So we went out and found them.

    それで、外に出て見つけたんです。

  • Fast forward to today,

    今日は早送り。

  • we're still discovering like never before.

    今までにないような発見をしています。

  • (soft marimba music)

    柔らかなマリンバの曲

  • - Paleontology as a science started in the 1800s.

    - 科学としての古生物学は1800年代に始まりました。

  • Back then, we understood for the first time

    当時、私たちは初めて理解しました

  • they were a unique and different group of animals.

    彼らはユニークで異なる動物のグループでした。

  • - [Narrator] Fossil discoveries were happening

    - 化石の発見が行われていました。

  • long before this distinction, though.

    しかし、この区別よりもずっと前に

  • Dinosaur bones were mistaken for mythological creatures

    恐竜の骨は神話の生き物と間違われていた

  • thousands of years before science

    科学以前の数千年

  • could tell us what they really were.

    彼らの本当の姿を教えてくれるかもしれない

  • And for generations,

    そして何世代にもわたって

  • people connected these fossils to living creatures

    人はこれらの化石を生物と結びつけて

  • they already knew.

    彼らはすでに知っていた

  • Until Richard Owen, frenemy of Charles Darwin,

    ダーウィンの宿敵 リチャード・オーウェンまで

  • concluded these fossils were different

    別物との結論

  • from any living creature on earth.

    地球上のあらゆる生物から

  • - He coined the term dinosaur,

    - 彼は恐竜という言葉を造語にしました。

  • the terrible lizard.

    恐ろしいトカゲ

  • - [Narrator] New type of animal, big step forward.

    - 新種の動物、大きな一歩を踏み出した。

  • (dinosaur roaring)

    (恐竜の咆哮)

  • - For the first 100 years,

    - 最初の100年は

  • we knew very, very little about dinosaurs.

    恐竜のことはほとんど知らなかった

  • We only knew 50 or 100 species or so.

    50種とか100種とかしか知らなかった。

  • - [Narrator] Discovery started slow,

    - [ナレーター] ディスカバリーはゆっくりと始まった

  • but the public's curiosity was high.

    が、世間の好奇心は高かった。

  • So a view into this prehistoric world

    だから、この先史時代の世界を見ることができます。

  • came from a different perspective, art.

    芸術という別の視点から来ました。

  • (upbeat jazz music)

    (アップビート・ジャズ・ミュージック)

  • Creativity brought dinosaurs to the cultural forefront.

    創造性は恐竜を文化の最前線に連れてきた。

  • While these drawings, paintings, and sculptures

    これらのドローイング、絵画、彫刻が

  • were initially based on scientific discoveries,

    は、当初は科学的な発見に基づいていました。

  • (toilet flushes)

    洗い場

  • let's just say that didn't last.

    それが続かなかったと言っておこう。

  • Our imaginations might've gotten a headstart,

    私たちの想像力が先走ってしまったのかもしれません。

  • but technology, it's catching up.

    でも、技術が追いついてきた。

  • - Paleontology has been undergoing this massive revolution.

    - 古生物学はこのような大革命を起こしています。

  • - [Narrator] One of those technologies?

    - その技術の一つか?

  • CT scanning, giving paleontologists a new look at dinosaurs.

    CTスキャン、古生物学者に恐竜の新しい見方を与える

  • - You can look at the brain size,

    - 脳みその大きさを見てみましょう。

  • you can look at the different parts of the brain,

    脳の様々な部分を見ることができます。

  • because basically the bones that demarcate the brain cavity

    脳腔を区切る骨は、基本的には脳腔を区切る骨だからだ

  • are very good proxy for what the brain actually looked like.

    は、脳が実際にどのように見えていたかの非常に優れたプロキシです。

  • So there's a ton of new morphological information

    新しい形態学的情報がたくさんあるんですね

  • that we can get through these high resolution

    これらの高解像度を通過することができることを

  • imaging techniques that are fairly new.

    かなり新しいイメージング技術。

  • - [Narrator] This in depth view has been a game changer

    - この奥行きのある景色は、ゲームを変えるものでした。

  • in the field,

    現場で。

  • but one classical aspect of paleontology

    古生物学の一面

  • has also experienced a renaissance.

    もルネッサンスを経験しています。

  • (shovels scraping)

    (ショベルを擦る)

  • Finding fossils.

    化石を探す。

  • - In the U.S. or Europe,

    - アメリカでもヨーロッパでも

  • that's where paleontology first grew as a science,

    古生物学が科学として発展したのはそこからです。

  • but other continents,

    しかし、他の大陸もそうです。

  • they have not been explored as much.

    探索されていませんでした。

  • There are so many expeditions being conducted right now,

    今は遠征がたくさん行われています。

  • but many, many new dinosaur species

    が、多くの、多くの新種の恐竜

  • are coming from these places.

    は、このようなところから来ています。

  • - [Narrator] Example, Diego's team in Patagonia

    - ナレーター】例:パタゴニアでのディエゴのチーム

  • discovering the Patagotitan mayorum,

    パタゴニアのマジョラムを発見。

  • one of the largest dinosaurs ever found.

    これまでに発見された中で最大級の恐竜の一つです。

  • Fossil discoveries in China are also answering

    中国での化石発見にも答えている

  • an age old question,

    昔からの疑問

  • dinosaurs' relationship to birds.

    恐竜と鳥の関係

  • - Birds are extremely rare in the fossil record,

    - 鳥類は化石の記録では非常に珍しい。

  • and this is for a number of reasons.

    と、これにはいくつかの理由があります。

  • One is that birds are all pretty small.

    一つは、鳥はみんなかなり小さいということ。

  • Aerodynamics limits body size, so you can't get that big.

    空力は体の大きさを制限しているので、そこまで大きくはなれません。

  • The other thing is that birds have hollow bones.

    もう一つは、鳥には骨が空洞になっているということです。

  • They get crushed easily,

    簡単に潰されてしまう。

  • they get destroyed, and they just don't survive.

    壊されても生き残れないだけだからな

  • So all these fossil birds all come

    だから、これらの化石の鳥たちは、すべて

  • from ancient lake deposits,

    古代湖の堆積物から

  • (bell dings)

    (ベルが鳴る)

  • the perfect environment to preserve

    ばんじょうかんきょう

  • these very delicate fossils.

    これらの非常にデリケートな化石。

  • - [Narrator] Birds evolving from dinosaurs

    - ナレーター】恐竜から進化する鳥たち

  • is not a new idea, but it's the access

    は目新しい発想ではありませんが、アクセス

  • to these ancient lake deposits

    これらの古代の湖の堆積物に

  • (bell dings)

    (ベルが鳴る)

  • that's finally providing the necessary evidence.

    これでようやく必要な証拠が出てきた

  • - The notion that birds are living dinosaurs

    - 鳥は生きた恐竜という考え方

  • actually dates back to like the second half

    じつは後半にさかのぼって

  • of the 19th century.

    19世紀の

  • A guy named Thomas Huxley, based on his observations,

    トーマス・ハクスリーという男が、彼の観察をもとに

  • he came up with a hypothesis

    仮説を立てた

  • that birds descended from small bipedal dinosaurs.

    鳥は小型の二足歩行恐竜の末裔であることがわかった。

  • But other scientists opposed this idea

    しかし、他の科学者はこの考えに反対した。

  • because they said, well, you know,

    と言われたからです。

  • all birds have a wishbone, right?

    鳥はみんなウィッシュボーンを持っていますよね?

  • This is not known in any dinosaurs.

    これはどの恐竜でも知られていません。

  • So birds can't be living dinosaurs.

    だから鳥は生きている恐竜にはなれない。

  • - [Narrator] Next up, John Ostrom,

    - 次はジョン・オストロムです

  • who analyzed theropod dinosaurs,

    恐竜を分析した

  • and also hypothesized that birds were living dinosaurs.

    また、鳥は生きた恐竜であるという仮説も立てた。

  • - But again, people kind of rejected this hypothesis.

    - しかし、またしても、人々はこの仮説を否定した。

  • At the time, their new reason was

    当時、彼らの新しい理由は

  • velociraptors that were supposed to be closely related

    獣人

  • to birds were much younger in the fossil record

    化石記録では鳥類の方がはるかに若かった。

  • than Archaeopteryx, the oldest bird.

    最古の鳥であるアルキオプテリクスよりも

  • So they were like,

    って感じだったんですね。

  • how could Archaeopteryx have descended from taxa

    どうやってアルキオプテリクスは種族から降りてきたのでしょうか?

  • that don't appear in the fossil record

    かせきにない

  • until like 70 million years later, right?

    7000万年後くらいまではね

  • (engine racing)

    競輪

  • - [Narrator] Inconclusive evidence persisted,

    - 決定的でない証拠が続いていた。

  • until, well, that's what brings us back

    それまでは、まあ、それが私たちを連れ戻してくれる

  • to these ancient lake deposits.

    これらの古代の湖の堆積物に

  • - So in 1996, you find

    - 1996年には

  • the first feathered dinosaur in China.

    中国で最初の羽の生えた恐竜。

  • So then an enormous amount of field work started to happen,

    そこで、膨大な量のフィールドワークが始まりました。

  • and this produced these thousands of specimens.

    そしてこれがこの数千の標本を生み出したのです。

  • (upbeat music)

    (アップビートな曲)

  • - [Narrator] Paleontologists then discovered an area

    - 古生物学者がある地域を発見した

  • where fossils predate Archaeopteryx.

    化石がアーキオプテリクスに先行している場所。

  • And within this area,

    そして、このエリア内で

  • they found small feathered dinosaurs with bird-like traits,

    鳥のような特徴を持つ小さな羽の生えた恐竜を発見しました。

  • including wings here and here,

    こことここの翼を含めて

  • making his theory much stronger, also.

    彼の理論をより強固なものにしている

  • - There was a little troodontid dinosaur named Mei long

    - メイ・ロングという名前の小さなトロドンティッド恐竜がいました。

  • that was discovered, and it's really tiny.

    それが発見されたのですが、本当にちっちゃいですね。

  • It's like this big,

    このくらいの大きさなんです。

  • and it's preserved with its head underneath its wing,

    と翼の下に頭を入れて保存されています。

  • sleeping the same way modern ducks do.

    現代のアヒルと同じように寝る

  • So that's behavioral evidence

    それは行動の証拠だ

  • that birds are in fact living dinosaurs.

    鳥は実際に生きている恐竜であることを

  • - [Narrator] Today, substantial evidence points

    - 今日、実質的な証拠はそれを示しています。

  • to birds evolving from dinosaurs, specifically theropods,

    恐竜から進化した鳥類、具体的には双足類に。

  • and showcases the progression of paleontology.

    と古生物学の進歩を紹介しています。

  • But the discoveries don't stop here.

    しかし、発見はここでは止まりません。

  • - There are still new things out there

    - まだまだ新しいものが出てきます

  • that once they are discovered

    いったんばれてしまえば

  • are gonna shake up everything we think we know.

    私たちが知っていると思っていたことを全てぶち壊すつもりです。

  • New data will cause us to adjust our existing hypotheses,

    新しいデータにより、既存の仮説を調整することができます。

  • so you just kind of have to go with the flow of discoveries.

    だから、発見の流れに身を任せるしかないんです。

(tribal drum music)

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 恐竜 化石 生物 発見 仮説 鳥類

なぜ今が古生物学の黄金時代なのか|Nat Geo Explores (Why Now is the Golden Age of Paleontology | Nat Geo Explores)

  • 8 1
    林宜悉 に公開 2020 年 11 月 15 日
動画の中の単語