Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • My name is Shari Davis,

    私の名前はシャリ・デイビス

  • and let's be honest,

    と正直に言ってみましょう。

  • I'm a recovering government employee.

    私は回復した公務員です。

  • And I say that with a huge shout-out to the folks that work in government

    政府の仕事をしている人たちに感謝の意を表します。

  • and on systems change.

    とシステム変更について。

  • It's hard.

    難しいですね。

  • It can be isolating.

    孤立してしまうこともある。

  • And the work can feel impossible.

    そして、仕事は不可能に感じることがあります。

  • But government is the people that show up.

    しかし、政府は顔を出すのは国民です。

  • Really, it's the people that can show up

    本当に、顔を出すことができるのは、人です。

  • and are committed to the promise that public service offers:

    と、公共サービスが提供する約束を約束しています。

  • service to people,

    人へのサービス。

  • democracy

    みんしゅしゅぎ

  • and fixing the problems that community members face.

    とコミュニティメンバーが抱えている問題を解決します。

  • Seventeen years ago,

    17年前のことです。

  • I walked through city hall for the first time as a staff member.

    初めて職員として市役所の中を歩きました。

  • And that walk revealed something to me.

    そして、その散歩は私に何かを明らかにしました。

  • I was a unicorn.

    私はユニコーンでした。

  • There weren't many people who looked like me

    私に似た人はあまりいませんでした

  • that worked in the building.

    建物の中で働いていた

  • And yet, there were folks committed to addressing hundreds of years

    それなのに、何百年もの間、この問題に取り組んできた人々がいた

  • of systemic inequity

    制度的不平等の

  • that left some behind and many ignored.

    何人かを置き去りにして、多くの人が無視しました。

  • Where there was promise,

    約束があったところに

  • there was a huge problem.

    大きな問題がありました。

  • You see, democracy, as it was originally designed,

    民主主義ってのは元々そうだったんだよな

  • had a fatal flaw.

    致命的な欠陥があった

  • It only laid pipeline for rich white men to progress.

    白人の金持ちが進歩するためのパイプラインを敷いただけ。

  • And now, if you're a smart rich white man,

    あとは、頭のいい金持ちの白人なら

  • you understand why I say that's a problem.

    それが問題だと言う理由が分かったか?

  • Massive talent has been left off the field.

    マスゴミのタレントは野放しになってしまった。

  • Our moral imaginations have grown anemic.

    私たちの道徳的想像力は貧弱になっている。

  • Our highest offices are plagued by corruption.

    私たちの最高のオフィスは汚職に悩まされています。

  • We're on the brink of a sort of apathetic apocalypse,

    私たちはある種の無気力な黙示録の瀬戸際にいる。

  • and it's not OK.

    と言ってもOKではありません。

  • We've got to open the doors

    私たちはドアを開けなければならない

  • to city halls and schools

    市役所や学校に

  • so wide that people can't help but walk in.

    人が入らずにはいられないほどの広さ。

  • We've got to throw out the old top-down processes

    古いトップダウンのプロセスを捨てなければならない

  • that got us into this mess,

    そのせいでこの混乱に陥ってしまった

  • and start over,

    と言ってやり直します。

  • with new faces around the table,

    テーブルを囲んで新しい顔で

  • new voices in the mix,

    新しい声をミックスした

  • and we have to welcome new perspectives every step of the way.

    そして、一歩一歩新しい視点を歓迎していかなければなりません。

  • Not because it's the right thing to do --

    それが正しいことだからではなく...

  • although it is --

    であるが

  • but because that's the only way for us to all succeed together.

    しかし、それは私たちが一緒に成功するための唯一の方法だからです。

  • And here's the best news of all.

    そして、ここからが最高のニュースです。

  • I know how to do it.

    やり方は知っています。

  • The answer -- well, an answer,

    答えは...まあ、答えだ。

  • is participatory budgeting.

    は参加型予算編成です。

  • That's right.

    その通りです。

  • Participatory budgeting, or "PB" for short.

    参加型予算編成、略して「PB」。

  • PB is a process that brings community and government together

    PBは地域と行政が一体となったプロセス

  • to ideate, develop concrete proposals

    アイデアを出し、具体的な提案をする

  • and vote on projects that solve real problems in community.

    と投票して、コミュニティ内の実際の問題を解決するプロジェクトに投票します。

  • Now I realize that people don't get up and dance

    人は立ち上がって踊らないことに気がつきました

  • when I start talking about public budgets.

    公共予算の話を始めると

  • But participatory budgeting

    しかし、参加型の予算編成

  • is actually about collective, radical imagination.

    は、実際には集団的な急進的な想像力についてのものです。

  • Everyone has a role to play in PB,

    PBには誰にでも役割があります。

  • and it works,

    そして、それは機能します。

  • because it allows community members to craft real solutions

    なぜなら、コミュニティのメンバーが真の解決策を作ることができるからです。

  • to real problems

    現実問題として

  • and provides the infrastructure for the promise of government.

    と政府の約束のためのインフラを提供しています。

  • And honestly,

    と正直なところ。

  • it's how I saw a democracy actually work for the first time.

    そうやって初めて民主主義が実際に機能するのを見ました。

  • I remember it like it was yesterday.

    昨日のことのように覚えています。

  • It was 2014 in Boston, Massachusetts,

    マサチューセッツ州ボストンの2014年のことです。

  • and mayor Menino asked me

    メニーノ市長が私に尋ねた

  • to launch the country's first youth-focused PB effort

    国内初の若者向けPB事業を立ち上げるために

  • with one million dollars of city funds.

    100万ドルの市の資金で

  • Now, we didn't start with line items and limits

    今では、ラインアイテムや限度額で始めたわけではありません。

  • or spreadsheets and formulas.

    またはスプレッドシートや数式を使用します。

  • We started with people.

    人から始めました。

  • We wanted to make sure that everyone was listened to.

    みんなの話を聞いてもらいたいと思っていました。

  • So we brought in young people

    若い人たちを連れてきたんですね。

  • from historically and traditionally marginalized neighborhoods,

    歴史的にも伝統的にも疎外されてきた地域の人たちから

  • members of the queer community

    クィアコミュニティのメンバー

  • and youth that were formerly incarcerated,

    と、かつて収監されていた若者たち。

  • and together, often with pizza and a sugar-free beverage,

    と一緒に、よくピザや無糖の飲み物と一緒に。

  • we talked about how to make Boston better.

    ボストンをより良くするためにはどうすればいいのか、という話をしました。

  • And we designed a process that we called "Youth Lead the Change."

    "ユース・リード・ザ・チェンジ "と 呼ばれるプロセスを設計しました

  • We imagined a Boston

    ボストンをイメージした

  • where young people could access the information

    若者が情報にアクセスできる場所

  • that they need to thrive.

    彼らが成長するために必要な

  • Where they could feel safe in their communities,

    地域社会の中で安心して暮らせる場所。

  • and where they can transform public spaces into real hubs of life

    公共スペースを生活の中心地に変えることができます。

  • for all people.

    すべての人のために

  • And that's exactly what they did.

    そして、それはまさに彼らがやったことだ。

  • In the first year,

    1年目には

  • young people allocated 90,000 dollars to increase technology access

    若者がテクノロジーへのアクセスを増やすために9万ドルを配分

  • for Boston public high school students,

    ボストンの公立高校生のための

  • by delivering laptops right to Boston public high schools,

    ボストンの公立高校にノートパソコンを届けることで

  • so that students could thrive inside and outside of the classroom.

    生徒が教室の内外で活躍できるように。

  • They allocated 60,000 dollars to creating art walls

    彼らは芸術の壁を作成するために60,000ドルを割り当てた

  • that literally and figuratively brightened up public spaces.

    文字通り、比喩的に公共空間を明るくしてくれました。

  • But they addressed a more important problem.

    しかし、彼らはもっと重要な問題に取り組んでいました。

  • Young people were being criminalized and pulled into the justice system

    若者は犯罪者化して司法制度に引きずり込まれていた

  • for putting their art on walls.

    壁にアートを貼るために

  • So this gave them a safe space to practice their craft.

    だから、これは彼らに安全な場所を与えてくれたのです。

  • They allocated 400,000 dollars to renovating parks,

    公園の改修に40万ドルを割り当てた。

  • to make them more accessible for all people of all bodies.

    すべての体のすべての人にとってより身近なものにするために。

  • Now, admittedly,

    今は、認められている。

  • this didn't go as smoothly as we had planned.

    計画通りにはいかなかった

  • Right before we broke ground on the park,

    公園の起工式の直前に

  • we actually found out that it was on top of an archaeological site

    実際に遺跡の上にあることがわかりました。

  • and had to halt construction.

    と工事を中止せざるを得なかった。

  • I thought I broke PB.

    PBを壊したと思っていた。

  • But because the city was so committed to the project,

    しかし、市の思い入れがあったからこそ

  • that's not what happened.

    そうじゃない

  • They invited community in to do a dig,

    彼らは地域の人たちを呼んで調査をしていました。

  • protected the site,

    を保護しました。

  • found artifacts,

    見つかった成果物。

  • extended Boston's history

    ボストンの歴史を広げた

  • and then moved forward with the renovation.

    と言ってリフォームを進めました。

  • If that isn't a reflection of radical imagination in government,

    それが政府の過激な想像力の反映でなければ

  • I don't know what is.

    何が何だかわからない。

  • What sounds simple

    シンプルに聞こえるもの

  • is actually transformational for the people and communities involved.

    は、実際には関係する人々やコミュニティに変革をもたらします。

  • I'm seeing community members shape transportation access,

    地域の人たちが交通アクセスを形にしているのを見ていると

  • improve their schools

    学校をよくする

  • and even transform government buildings,

    そして、政府の建物までも変形させてしまいます。

  • so that there is space inside of them for them.

    彼らのためにそれらの中にスペースがあるように。

  • Before we had PB,

    PBがある前は

  • I would see people who look like me

    私に似た人を見ると

  • and come from where I come from

    と私が来たところから来る

  • walk in to government buildings for this new initiative

    庁舎内での新しい取り組み

  • or that new working group,

    またはその新しいワーキンググループ。

  • and then I'd watch them walk right back out.

    歩いて出て行くのを見ていました

  • Sometimes I wouldn't see them again.

    二度と会わないこともあった。

  • It's because their expertise was being unvalued.

    彼らの専門性が評価されていなかったからだ。

  • They weren't truly being engaged in the process.

    彼らは本当の意味で関与していなかった。

  • Put PB is different.

    パットPBは違います。

  • When we started doing PB,

    PBをやり始めた頃。

  • I met amazing young leaders across the city.

    街中で素晴らしい若手リーダーに出会いました。

  • One in particular, a rock star, Malachi Hernandez,

    特に一人は、ロックスターのマラチ・ヘルナンデス。

  • 15 years old,

    15歳。

  • came into a community meeting --

    集会に出てきて

  • shy, curious, a little quiet.

    恥ずかしがり屋、好奇心旺盛、少し静か。

  • Stuck around

    立ち往生

  • and became one of the young people hoping to lead the project.

    と、プロジェクトをリードしたいと願う若者の一人となりました。

  • Now fast-forward a couple of years.

    数年前に早送りして

  • Malachi was the first in his family to attend college.

    マラキは家族の中で最初に大学に通っていました。

  • A couple of weeks ago,

    数週間前に

  • he was the first in his family to graduate.

    彼は家族の中で一番最初に卒業しました。

  • Malachi has appeared

    マラキが登場

  • in the Obama White House several times

    オバマホワイトハウスで何度か

  • as part of the My Brother's Keeper initiative.

    My Brother's Keeperの活動の一環として。

  • President Obama even quotes Malachi in interviews.

    オバマ大統領はインタビューでもマラキを引用しています。

  • It's true, you can look it up.

    確かに、調べればわかる。

  • Malachi got engaged, stayed engaged,

    マラカイは婚約して、婚約したままだった。

  • and is out here changing the way we think about community leadership

    そして、ここではコミュニティのリーダーシップについての考え方を変えています。

  • and potential.

    と可能性があります。

  • Or my friend Maria Hadden,

    あるいは友人のマリア・ハッデン。

  • who was involved in the first PB process in Chicago.

    シカゴでの最初のPBプロセスに関わった人。

  • Then went on to become a founding

    その後、創業者になって

  • participatory budgeting project board member,

    参加型予算編成プロジェクト理事。

  • eventually a staff member,

    最終的にはスタッフになります。

  • and then unseated a 28-year incumbent,

    そして、28年の現職を退けた。

  • becoming the first queer Black alderperson

    黒人初代市会議員就任

  • in Chicago's history.

    シカゴの歴史の中で

  • That's real engagement.

    それが本当のエンゲージメントです。

  • That's being taken seriously.

    それが真面目に受け止められている。

  • That's building out and building on community leadership.

    それは、コミュニティのリーダーシップを構築し、構築することです。

  • That's system change.

    それがシステム変更です。

  • And it's not just in the US either.

    アメリカだけじゃないんだよね。

  • After starting 30 years ago in Brazil,

    30年前にブラジルでスタートしてから

  • PB has spread to over 7,000 cities across the globe.

    PBは世界の7,000以上の都市に広がっています。

  • In Paris, France,

    フランスのパリで。

  • the mayor puts up five percent of her budget,

    市長は予算の5パーセントを 捻出しています

  • over 100 million euros,

    1億ユーロ以上。

  • for community members to decide on and shape their city.

    地域の人たちが自分たちの街を決め、形にしていくために。

  • Globally, PB has been shown to improve public health,

    世界的には、PBは公衆衛生を改善することが示されています。

  • reduce corruption

    腐敗を減らす

  • and increase trust in government.

    し、政府への信頼を高める。

  • Now we know the challenges that we face in today's society.

    今の社会で直面している課題を知ることができました。

  • How can we expect people to feel motivated,

    人のやる気を期待するにはどうしたらいいのでしょうか。

  • to show up to the polls

    投票に出る

  • when they can't trust that government is run by and for the people.

    政府は国民のために運営されていると信じられない時に

  • I argue that we haven't actually experienced

    実際には経験していないことを主張します。

  • true participatory democracy

    真の参加型民主主義

  • in these United States of America just yet.

    このアメリカ合衆国ではまだ

  • But democracy is a living, breathing thing.

    しかし、民主主義は生きていて呼吸しているものだ。

  • And it's still our birthright.

    そして、それはまだ私たちの生まれながらの権利です。

  • It's time to renew trust, and that's not going to come easy.

    信頼を新たにする時が来たんだ簡単にはいかないよ

  • We have to build new ways of thinking,

    新しい考え方を構築していかなければなりません。

  • of talking, of working, of dreaming, of planning

    談義仕事夢想計画

  • in its place.

    その場で

  • What would America look like if everyone had a seat at the table?

    みんながテーブルに座っていたら、アメリカはどう見えるだろう?

  • If we took the time to reimagine what's possible,

    時間をかけて可能なことを再考すれば

  • and then ask, "How do we get there?"

    と聞いて、「どうやって行くの?

  • My favorite author, Octavia Butler, says it best.

    私の好きな作家、オクタヴィア・バトラーが一番よく言っています。

  • In "Parable of the Sower," basically my Bible, she says,

    さわぐさのたとえ」では、基本的には私の聖書の中で、彼女は言っています。

  • "All that you touch You Change.

    "あなたが触れたものはすべてあなたが変わる

  • All that you Change Changes you.

    あなたが変わることであなたは変わります。

  • The only lasting truth Is Change.

    唯一の永続的な真実は変化です。

  • God Is Change."

    "神は変化する"

  • It's time for these 50 states to change.

    この50州が変わる時が来たんだ

  • What got us here sure as hell won't get us there.

    ここに来たことで、そこには辿り着けないだろう。

  • We've got to kick the walls of power down

    権力の壁を蹴散らすんだ

  • and plant gardens of genuine democracy in their place.

    と、その場所に真の民主主義の庭を植える。

  • That's how we change systems.

    そうやってシステムを変えていくんです。

  • By opening doors so wide

    扉を大きく開くことで

  • that people can't help but walk in.

    人が入らずにはいられないほどの

  • So what's stopping you

    だから何で止めるんだ?

  • from bringing participatory budgeting to your community?

    あなたの地域社会に参加型予算編成をもたらすことから?

My name is Shari Davis,

私の名前はシャリ・デイビス

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 予算 ボストン コミュニティ 若者 政府 公共

政府が公的資金をどのように使うかを決める手助けができるとしたら?| シャリ・デイビス (What if you could help decide how the government spends public funds? | Shari Davis)

  • 2 1
    林宜悉 に公開 2020 年 11 月 02 日
動画の中の単語