Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • What is up with us white people?

    書き起こし者ジョセフ・ジェニ レビュアーカミーユ・マルティネス

  • (Laughter)

    私たち白人はどうしたの?

  • I've been thinking about that a lot the last few years,

    (笑)

  • and I know I have company.

    ここ数年よく考えていました。

  • Look, I get it --

    そして、私には仲間がいることを知っています。

  • people of color have been asking that question for centuries.

    いいか、俺はそれを...

  • But I think a growing number of white folks are too,

    有色人種の人々は何世紀にもわたってその質問をしてきました。

  • given what's been going on out there

    でも、白人も増えてきていると思います。

  • in our country.

    外野の様子からして

  • And notice I said, "What's up with us white people?"

    私たちの国では

  • because right now, I'm not talking about those white people,

    "白人はどうしたんだ?"って言ったのに気付いたわ

  • the ones with the swastikas and the hoods and the tiki torches.

    だって、今はその白人たちの話をしているわけじゃないんだから。

  • They are a problem and a threat.

    鉤十字とフードを被ったものと チキ・トーチを持ったもの。

  • They perpetrate most of the terrorism in our country,

    彼らは問題であり、脅威です。

  • as you all in Charlottesville know better than most.

    彼らは我が国のテロの大部分を加害しています。

  • But I'm talking about something bigger and more pervasive.

    シャーロッツビルの皆さんがよく知っているように

  • I'm talking about all of us,

    しかし、私が言っているのは、もっと大きくて、もっと広範囲に広がっているものがあるということです。

  • white folks writ large.

    全員のことを言ってるんだ

  • And maybe, especially, people sort of like me,

    白人は大きく書く

  • self-described progressive,

    そして、おそらく、特に、人々は私のことを好きなようです。

  • don't want to be racist.

    自称プログレッシブ。

  • Good white people.

    差別されたくない

  • (Laughter)

    善良な白人。

  • Any good white people in the room?

    (笑)

  • (Laughter)

    いい白人はいないのか?

  • I was raised to be that sort of person.

    (笑)

  • I was a little kid in the '60s and '70s,

    私はそういう人間に育てられました。

  • and to give you some sense of my parents:

    60~70年代の子供の頃は

  • actual public opinion polls at the time

    と、親の気持ちを汲み取ってくれるように。

  • showed that only a small minority, about 20 percent of white Americans,

    当時の世論調査

  • approved and supported

    は、白人アメリカ人の約20%というごく少数派に過ぎないことを示しています。

  • Martin Luther King and his work with the civil rights movement

    賛否両論

  • while Dr. King was still alive.

    マーティン・ルーサー・キングと公民権運動の取り組み

  • I'm proud to say my parents were in that group.

    キング牧師が生きている間に

  • Race got talked about in our house.

    親がそのグループに入っていたことを誇りに思います。

  • And when the shows that dealt with race would come on the television,

    家の中では人種の話が出てきました。

  • they would sit us kids down, made sure we watched:

    人種を扱った番組がテレビに出てくると

  • the Sidney Poitier movies, "Roots" ...

    子供たちを座らせて見ていたのよ

  • The message was loud and clear,

    シドニー・ポワチエ映画「ルーツ」...

  • and I got it:

    大きな声ではっきりとしたメッセージを伝えていました。

  • racism is wrong; racists are bad people.

    と言って手に入れました。

  • At the same time,

    人種差別は間違っている、人種差別主義者は悪い人たちだ

  • we lived in a very white place in Minnesota.

    同時に。

  • And I'll just speak for myself,

    ミネソタの真っ白な場所に住んでいました。

  • I think that allowed me to believe that those white racists on the TV screen

    と、自分で言うのもなんですが

  • were being beamed in from some other place.

    テレビ画面に映っている白人差別主義者たちを信じることができたのだと思います。

  • It wasn't about us, really.

    どこか他の場所から転送されてきていた。

  • I did not feel implicated.

    私たちのことではありませんでした。

  • Now, I would say, I'm still in recovery from that early impression.

    巻き込まれたとは感じませんでした。

  • I got into journalism

    さて、私が言うのもなんですが、あの初期の印象からまだ回復していません。

  • in part because I cared about things like equality and justice.

    ジャーナリズムの世界に入った

  • For a long time, racism was just such a puzzle to me.

    平等や正義のようなものを気にしていたこともあります。

  • Why is it still with us when it's so clearly wrong?

    長い間、人種差別は私にはパズルのようなものでした。

  • Why such a persistent force?

    こんなに明らかに間違っているのに、なんでまだ一緒にいるんだろう?

  • Maybe I was puzzled because I wasn't yet looking in the right place

    なぜそんなしつこい力があるのか?

  • or asking the right questions.

    まだ見当違いで戸惑っていたのかもしれません。

  • Have you noticed

    とか、正しい質問をしています。

  • that when people in our mostly white media

    お気づきですか?

  • report on what they consider to be racial issues,

    私たちのほとんどが白人のメディアにいる人たちが

  • what we consider to be racial issues,

    彼らが人種問題と考えていることを報告する。

  • what that usually means is that we're pointing our cameras

    我々が人種問題と考えるもの

  • and our microphones and our gaze

    カメラを向けているということは

  • at people of color,

    マイクも視線も

  • asking questions like,

    カラーの人たちのところで

  • "How are Black folks or Native Americans, Latino or Asian Americans,

    のような質問をしています。

  • how are they doing?"

    "黒人やネイティブアメリカン、ラティーノやアジア系アメリカ人はどうなの?

  • in a given community or with respect to some issue --

    "どうしてる?"

  • the economy, education.

    の中で、あるいは何かの問題に関連して

  • I've done my share of that kind of journalism

    経済、教育。

  • over many years.

    私もその手のジャーナリズムをしてきました

  • But then George Zimmerman killed Trayvon Martin,

    何年にもわたって

  • followed by this unending string of high-profile police shootings

    でもジョージ・ジンマーマンが トレーボン・マーチンを殺した

  • of unarmed Black people,

    続いて警察射殺事件

  • the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement,

    非武装の黒人の

  • Dylann Roof and the Charleston massacre,

    ブラック・リヴズ・マター運動の台頭

  • #OscarsSoWhite --

    ディラン・ルーフとチャールストン大虐殺

  • all the incidents from the day-to-day of American life,

    #♪OscarsSoWhite --

  • these overtly racist incidents

    アメリカの日々の出来事の全てを

  • that we now get to see because they're captured on smartphones

    差別事件

  • and sent across the internet.

    今ではスマホで撮影されているからこそ見ることができます。

  • And beneath those visible events,

    とインターネットを介して送信されます。

  • the stubborn data,

    そして、それらの目に見える出来事の下に

  • the studies showing systemic racism in every institution we have:

    頑固なデータ

  • housing segregation, job discrimination,

    私たちが持っているすべての機関で体系的な人種差別を示す研究。

  • the deeply racialized inequities in our schools

    住宅隔離、雇用差別。

  • and criminal justice system.

    学校での人種間格差の問題

  • And what really did it for me,

    と刑事司法制度。

  • and I know I'm not alone in this, either:

    そして、私のために本当にしてくれたこと。

  • the rise of Donald Trump

    と、これも私一人ではないことを知っています。

  • and the discovery that a solid majority of white Americans

    ドナルド・トランプの台頭

  • would embrace or at least accept

    と、白人アメリカ人の確固たる多数派であることの発見。

  • such a raw, bitter kind of white identity politics.

    受け入れる

  • This was all disturbing to me as a human being.

    白人のアイデンティティー政治のような生々しくて苦いものです。

  • As a journalist, I found myself turning the lens around,

    人間として不穏なことばかりでした。

  • thinking,

    ジャーナリストである私は、気がつくとレンズを回していました。

  • "Wow, white folks are the story.

    考えること。

  • Whiteness is a story,"

    "うわー、白人はネタだな。

  • And also thinking, "Can I do that?

    白さは物語である。"

  • What would a podcast series about whiteness sound like?"

    また、「私にもできるかな」と思ったりもします。

  • (Laughter)

    白さについてのポッドキャストシリーズはどんな感じなんだろう?"

  • "And oh, by the way -- this could get uncomfortable."

    (笑)

  • I had seen almost no journalism that looked deeply at whiteness,

    "ところで...不快になるかもしれない"

  • but, of course, people of color and especially Black intellectuals

    白さを深く見つめるジャーナリズムはほとんど見たことがなかった。

  • have made sharp critiques of white supremacist culture

    もちろん有色人種の人たち、特に黒人の知識人たちですが

  • for centuries,

    白人至上主義文化を鋭く批判してきた

  • and I knew that in the last two or three decades,

    何世紀にもわたって

  • scholars had done interesting work

    と、ここ2、30年で知った。

  • looking at race through the frame of whiteness,

    学者は面白い仕事をしていた

  • what it is, how we got it, how it works in the world.

    白さの枠を通して人種を見る。

  • I started reading,

    何なのか、どうやって手に入れたのか、どうやって世界で活躍しているのか。

  • and I reached out to some leading experts on race and the history of race.

    読み始めました。

  • One of the first questions I asked was,

    と、レースやレースの歴史の第一人者に声をかけました。

  • "Where did this idea of being a white person

    最初に聞いた質問の一つが

  • come from in the first place?"

    "白人である "という考えはどこから来たのか

  • Science is clear.

    "そもそもどこから来たんだ?"

  • We are one human race.

    科学は明確だ

  • We're all related,

    私たちは一つの人類です。

  • all descended from a common ancestor in Africa.

    私たちは皆、関係者です。

  • Some people walked out of Africa into colder, darker places

    全てアフリカの共通の祖先の子孫。

  • and lost a lot of their melanin,

    アフリカを出て、より寒くて暗い場所に歩いて行った人もいます。

  • some of us more than others.

    とメラニンを多く失ってしまいました。

  • (Laughter)

    ある者は他の者よりも

  • But genetically, we are all 99.9 percent the same.

    (笑)

  • There's more genetic diversity within what we call racial groups

    しかし、遺伝的には99.9%の人間は同じです。

  • than there is between racial groups.

    人種と呼ばれるものの中には、より多くの遺伝的多様性があります。

  • There's no gene for whiteness or blackness or Asian-ness

    人種間の違いよりも

  • or what have you.

    白さや黒さやアジア人らしさの遺伝子がない

  • So how did this happen?

    とか何かあるんじゃないかな?

  • How did we get this thing?

    で、どうしてこうなったの?

  • How did racism start?

    どうやって手に入れたんだろう?

  • I think if you had asked me to speculate on that,

    人種差別はどのようにして始まったのか?

  • in my ignorance, some years ago,

    憶測で聞いていたらそう思う。

  • I probably would have said,

    何年か前の私の無知のうちに

  • "Well, I guess somewhere back in deep history,

    と言っていたかもしれません。

  • people encountered one another,

    "まぁ、深い歴史のどこかに戻ったんでしょうね。

  • and they found each other strange.

    人と人が出会いました。

  • 'Your skin is a different color, your hair is different,

    と、お互いに不思議に思っていました。

  • you dress funny.

    '肌の色も髪の毛の色も違う。

  • I guess I'll just go ahead and jump to the conclusion

    あなたは変な格好をしている

  • that since you're different

    結論から言うと

  • that you're somehow less than me,

    あなたは違うから

  • and maybe that makes it OK for me to mistreat you.'"

    あなたは私よりも劣っていると思っている

  • Right?

    "君を虐待してもいいと思う"

  • Is that something like what we imagine or assume?

    だろ?

  • And under that kind of scenario,

    それは、私たちが想像したり、思い込んだりしているようなものなのでしょうか?

  • it's all a big, tragic misunderstanding.

    そして、そのようなシナリオの下では

  • But it seems that's wrong.

    悲劇的な誤解だよ

  • First of all, race is a recent invention.

    でも、それは間違っているようです。

  • It's just a few hundred years old.

    まず、レースは最近の発明です。

  • Before that, yes, people divided themselves

    ほんの数百年前の話です。

  • by religion, tribal group, language,

    その前に、そう、人は分断されていた

  • things like that.

    宗教別、部族別、言語別

  • But for most of human history,

    みたいなことも。

  • people had no notion of race.

    しかし、人類の歴史のほとんどは

  • In Ancient Greece, for example --

    人は人種という概念を持っていなかった。

  • and I learned this from the historian Nell Irvin Painter --

    例えば古代ギリシャでは

  • the Greeks thought they were better than the other people they knew about,

    歴史家のネル・アーヴィン・ペインターから学んだことだ

  • but not because of some idea that they were innately superior.

    ギリシア人は自分たちの方が優れていると思っていた。

  • They just thought that they'd developed the most advanced culture.

    しかし、彼らが生まれつき優れているという考えのせいではありません。

  • So they looked around at the Ethiopians,

    彼らは自分たちが最先端の文化を発展させたと思っていただけだ。

  • but also the Persians and the Celts,

    そこで彼らはエチオピア人を見回した。

  • and they said, "They're all kind of barbaric compared to us.

    とはいえ、ペルシャ人やケルト人のことでもあります。

  • Culturally, they're just not Greek."

    と言って、「俺たちに比べたら野蛮な奴らばかりだ。

  • And yes, in the ancient world, there was lots of slavery,

    文化的にはギリシャ人ではない"

  • but people enslaved people who didn't look like them,

    古代世界には奴隷制度があった

  • and they often enslaved people who did.

    でも、人は自分に似ていない人を奴隷にしていました。

  • Did you know that the English word "slave" is derived from the word "Slav"?

    と言って奴隷にしてしまうことが多かったのです。

  • Because Slavic people were enslaved by all kinds of folks,

    英語の「slave」という言葉の語源が「Slav」であることをご存知でしょうか?

  • including Western Europeans,

    スラブ人は色んな人に奴隷にされてたからな

  • for centuries.

    西欧人を含む。

  • Slavery wasn't about race either,

    何世紀にもわたって

  • because no one had thought up race yet.

    奴隷制度も人種の問題ではありませんでした。

  • So who did?

    まだ誰もレースを考えていなかったからだ。

  • I put that question to another leading historian,

    誰がやったんだ?

  • Ibram Kendi.

    私はその質問を別の有力な歴史家に投げかけた。

  • I didn't expect he would answer the question

    イブラム・ケンディ

  • in the form of one person's name and a date,

    彼が質問に答えるとは思わなかった

  • as if we were talking about the light bulb.

    一人の名前と日付を入れた形で

  • (Laughter)

    まるで電球の話をしているかのように

  • But he did.

    (笑)

  • (Laughter)

    しかし、彼はそうした。

  • He said, in his exhaustive research,

    (笑)

  • he found what he believed to be the first articulation of racist ideas.

    徹底した研究の中で、彼は言った。

  • And he named the culprit.

    彼は、人種差別的な考えの最初の表現だと信じていたものを発見しました。

  • This guy should be more famous,

    そして犯人を指名した。

  • or infamous.

    こいつはもっと有名になった方がいい

  • His name is Gomes de Zurara.

    または悪名高い。

  • Portuguese man.

    彼の名前はゴメス・デ・ズラララ。

  • Wrote a book in the 1450s

    ポルトガル人。

  • in which he did something that no one had ever done before,

    1450年代に本を書いた

  • according to Dr. Kendi.

    彼は誰もやったことのないことをした。

  • He lumped together all the people of Africa --

    ケンディ博士によると

  • a vast, diverse continent --

    彼はアフリカのすべての人々を一括りにした--。

  • and he described them as a distinct group,

    広大な大陸

  • inferior and beastly.

    と記述しており、彼はそれらを別個のグループとして記述しています。

  • Never mind that in that precolonial time

    劣等感と野獣のような

  • some of the most sophisticated cultures in the world were in Africa.

    その前植民地時代のことは気にしないでください

  • Why would this guy make this claim?

    世界で最も洗練された文化のいくつかはアフリカにありました。

  • Turns out, it helps to follow the money.

    なんでこいつがこんな主張をするんだ?

  • First of all, Zurara was hired to write that book

    結局のところ、お金を追うのに役立つんです。

  • by the Portuguese king,

    まず、その本を書くために雇われたのがズラララです。

  • and just a few years before,

    ポルトガル王によって。

  • slave traders --

    と、ほんの数年前のことです。

  • here we go --

    奴隷商人

  • slave traders tied to the Portuguese crown

    いくぞ

  • had effectively pioneered the Atlantic slave trade.

    冠婚葬祭

  • They were the first Europeans to sail directly to sub-Saharan Africa

    は大西洋の奴隷貿易を事実上開拓していた。

  • to kidnap and enslave African people.

    彼らはサハラ以南のアフリカに直接航海した最初のヨーロッパ人でした。

  • So it was suddenly really helpful

    アフリカの人々を誘拐して奴隷にするために

  • to have a story about the inferiority of African people

    だから、急に本当に助かりました。

  • to justify this new trade

    アフリカ人の劣等感をネタにする

  • to other people, to the church,

    この新しい取引を正当化するために

  • to themselves.

    他の人にも教会にも

  • And with the stroke of a pen,

    自分たちのために。

  • Zurara invented both blackness and whiteness,

    そしてペンの一筆で

  • because he basically created the notion of blackness

    ズラララは黒さと白さの両方を発明した。

  • through this description of Africans,

    彼は基本的に黒さの概念を作ったからだ

  • and as Dr. Kendi says,

    このアフリカ人の描写を通して

  • blackness has no meaning without whiteness.

    とケンディ先生がおっしゃるように

  • Other European countries followed the Portuguese lead

    黒さは白さがなければ意味がない。

  • in looking to Africa for human property and free labor

    他のヨーロッパ諸国もポルトガルに追随

  • and in adopting this fiction

    人的財産と労働の自由を求めてアフリカに目を向けて

  • about the inferiority of African people.

    そして、このフィクションを採用することで

  • I found this clarifying.

    アフリカ人の劣等感について

  • Racism didn't start with a misunderstanding,

    これが明確になっていることがわかりました。

  • it started with a lie.

    人種差別は誤解から始まったものではありません。

  • Meanwhile, over here in colonial America,

    嘘から始まった

  • the people now calling themselves white got busy taking these racist ideas

    一方、ここ植民地時代のアメリカでは

  • and turning them into law,

    今は白人と呼ばれる人たちは、このような人種差別的な考えを取るのに忙しくなっています。

  • laws that stripped all human rights from the people they were calling Black

    そして、それらを法律に変えていく。

  • and locking them into our particularly vicious brand of chattel slavery,

    ブラックと呼ばれる人々から 人権を剥奪する法律

  • and laws that gave even the poorest white people benefits,

    そして、特に悪質な奴隷制度の中に 閉じ込めてしまう。

  • not big benefits in material terms

    と、貧乏な白人にも恩恵を与える法律があった。

  • but the right to not be enslaved for life,

    物的には大したことはない

  • the right to not have your loved ones torn from your arms and sold,

    が、生涯奴隷にされない権利がある。

  • and sometimes real goodies.

    愛する人の腕を引きちぎられて売られない権利。

  • The handouts of free land in places like Virginia

    そして、時には本物のグッズも。

  • to white people only

    バージニアのような場所での自由な土地の手渡しは

  • started long before the American Revolution

    白人だけに

  • and continued long after.

    アメリカ独立以前から

  • Now, I can imagine

    と長く続きました。

  • there would be people listening to me -- if they're still listening --

    今、私は想像できます。

  • who might be thinking,

    私の話を聞いている人がいるはずだまだ聞いているなら...

  • "Come on, this is all ancient history. Why does this matter?

    誰が考えているのか

  • Things have changed.

    "おいおい、これは全部古代史だぞなんでそんなことが重要なんだ?

  • Can't we just get over it and move on?"

    物事が変わった。

  • Right?

    "それを乗り越えて前に進むことはできないのか?"

  • But I would argue, for me certainly,

    だろ?

  • learning this history has brought a real shift

    しかし、私は主張したいと思います。

  • in the way that I understand racism today.

    歴史を学ぶことは、本当の意味での転換をもたらした