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  • - Hello, I'm Amy Walker.

  • Yes, I'm Amy Walker.

  • Amy Walker, innit?

  • Take one. [claps]

  • Hello, I'm Amy Walker.

  • I'm an actress most known for me accents,

  • and today we're gonna look at some British accents

  • in films.

  • [lighthearted music]

  • - She will prick her finger

  • on the spindle of a spinning wheel

  • and fall into a sleep-like death!

  • - This is "Maleficent" directed by Robert Stromberg in 2014.

  • And we'll be looking at Angelina Jolie's English accent.

  • - A sleep from which she will never awaken!

  • - "Awaken."

  • That "en"

  • nails it.

  • Two things there that people often miss

  • when they're doing this sort of an accent.

  • It can be a tendency to go "awaken."

  • In America, we'll take that E,

  • and we'll just make it an "eh".

  • That "eh" in this accent becomes "euh".

  • "Awaken".

  • And then you had that bit of an aspiration

  • that's sort of an H breathy sound on the K,

  • and it gives it this [clicks tongue] "awaken."

  • - I had wings once.

  • They were stolen from me.

  • - "Stolen from me.

  • "From."

  • "Stolen from me."

  • You can, you can say "stolen from me."

  • That works or we can say "stolen from me."

  • - Were they big?

  • - So big they dragged behind me when I walked.

  • - When she says "walked," that's really excellent.

  • The A-L,

  • A-H,

  • A-W,

  • all those things that in American are "ah",

  • they're all different in English accents.

  • So we've got "walked,"

  • and it's very long.

  • What people have a tendency to do is go, "walked"

  • or something very tight and odd.

  • - Royalty,

  • nobility,

  • a gentry,

  • and

  • how quaint,

  • even the rebels.

  • - "Even the rebels."

  • Oh!

  • I had high expectations

  • for this RP

  • or Received Pronunciation.

  • It's called received because you're not born into it.

  • You have to learn it.

  • You have to be educated.

  • I have a few theories

  • as to why

  • so many villains

  • in Disney movies and beyond

  • have this Received Pronunciation excellent.

  • And for one,

  • the tones you get to use

  • and play around with are just

  • deliciously good fun.

  • It's as if you really don't care

  • what they think of you,

  • but also it sounds extremely educated

  • because you can't get it

  • unless you are educated into it.

  • And then the stillness

  • of

  • power.

  • - Good, then I'll inject them.

  • - Yeah, and I'll find a spot to get rid of the body.

  • - All valid ideas.

  • - This is "Ocean's 13"

  • directed by Steven Soderbergh in 2007.

  • We're looking at Don Cheadle's Cockney accent.

  • - That's the rules for someone who understands the rules,

  • which Bank don't 'cause he already broke 'em,

  • so he don't get the chance.

  • - Where to start, really?

  • Don Cheadle's

  • wonderful actor,

  • but this is

  • bit of a mess.

  • "Don't."

  • The resonance for this accent is really down in the gutter.

  • It's down in your mouth.

  • It's down up in here.

  • "Don't."

  • You're gonna take that tongue,

  • and the D is not going to be a D like this.

  • It's going to be "thee," "tho,"

  • and it'll be "don't."

  • - And this polymer reacts to ultrasonic pulses.

  • - When you say "ultrasonic", "ultrasonic",

  • that's gonna have like more of a W to it than an L.

  • And it's gonna be forward in the mouth.

  • - But it's not metallic

  • so the compasses on the table won't detect it.

  • - Sometimes when people do a glottal catch

  • or a glottal stop,

  • it's a bit extra.

  • So "but it's not" like it's sort of a double,

  • "but it's not" instead of "but it's not."

  • "Not" is a really open sound, "aw."

  • Now your Cockney accent is really a working class,

  • East End thing.

  • It's,

  • it's really chewy.

  • The resonance is still high,

  • but it's also really forward.

  • It's like it starts up here,

  • and then it lands down in here.

  • - I can't leave.

  • - Why are you such a-- - Sorry, ask somebody else.

  • Ask Livingston.

  • He's such a wowser.

  • - "Wowser."

  • - Look, I've done research.

  • Positive messages get through.

  • - "I've done research.

  • "Positive messages get through."

  • So "I've done,"

  • it's going to be that "thee," "done,"

  • and it's going to be resonating up in here

  • and landing down in here.

  • "Research."

  • Forward.

  • "Positive."

  • It's going to be "oh" instead of "positive,"

  • back here for the states.

  • "Positive messages get through."

  • And then you're not going to put the T-H

  • because why put T-H when you can just put an F?

  • - The tricold optimizers

  • that feed into the nipple sleep receivers

  • perforated their lubricating bladders

  • and began tension against the side walls.

  • - [Male Voice From Phone] Uh-huh.

  • - I think he's saying

  • "perforated their lubricating patterns" or something?

  • "Perforated."

  • It's just living so middle in the mouth,

  • and then the glottal stops are leaping out at you

  • and just not really doing what they're meant to do.

  • [Don Cheadle's character coughs]

  • - [Male Voice From Phone] Where's that putter?

  • [Don Cheadle's character coughs]

  • - Oh.

  • Uh.

  • Cattled.

  • - "Cattled" versus "cattled,"

  • I think this is rhyming slang,

  • which is a whole world of a language.

  • "Cattled" would be short for cattle trucked,

  • which rhymes with another word you can probably guess.

  • - His union pay masters have called a strike deliberately

  • to cripple our

  • economy. [audience groans]

  • - This is "The Iron Lady"

  • directed by Phyllida Lloyd in 2011.

  • It stars Meryl Streep as Margaret Thatcher.

  • - Teachers cannot teach when there is no heating,

  • no lighting in their classrooms.

  • And I asked the Right Honorable gentleman,

  • whose fault is that?

  • - [Audience] Yours! [jeers]

  • - Margaret Thatcher had a lot of flack

  • in the beginning of her political career

  • about "the lady doth screech too much."

  • So the way that she'll "that,"

  • you know, really screech it a bit.

  • And she's up in the higher tones,

  • and she really gets,

  • there was something for Margaret Thatcher

  • about the way that she talked through her teeth.

  • But it's absolutely dead on.

  • - When did I lose track of everyone?

  • - "Where did I lose track of everyone?"

  • The way that the age just sits in her face.

  • "Track of everyone."

  • You still have the teeth,

  • and you still have the voice.

  • But this is after she's had vocal training

  • to lower her voice,

  • and all that is in there, plus age.

  • So it's gone even lower,

  • and you just really feel the weight of her age, yeah.

  • - When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor,

  • did America go cap in hand

  • and ask Tojo for a peaceful negotiation of terms?

  • - "Terms."

  • "Did America go cap in hand?"

  • This is after she's had that vocal training.

  • And she really had a lovely, warm tone

  • in her voice after that,

  • but she's also got that sharp way

  • that Margaret Thatcher did emphasize certain consonants

  • at different times.

  • - Did she turn her back on her own citizens there

  • because the islands were thousands of miles away

  • from the mainland United States?

  • No!

  • No, no!

  • - The way that she uses her voice

  • to carve out that grounded, powerful tone and the consonants

  • that make it sharp and important and listened to,

  • and that to me is my favorite.

  • And that's why Meryl Streep, [sighs]

  • such an inspiration.

  • - Hello.

  • Mrs. Hillard, I presume?

  • - This is "Mrs. Doubtfire"

  • directed by Chris Columbus in 2003.

  • We're gonna look at Robin Williams as Mrs. Doubtfire.

  • He's doing kind of a slight Scottish accent,

  • maybe a little bit Edinburgh.

  • And it's not like a real Glasgow, hard Highland accent.

  • Pierce Brosnan even says later in the film,

  • it's a bit muddled.

  • So it's kind of set up to be its own creation,

  • which I think Robin does really Well.

  • You know, when you say "don't fail,"

  • it feels like it should be

  • in a wee bit of a Scottish accent.

  • So it's quite soothing,

  • the tones that he's chosen.

  • - You've a generic Doubtfire.

  • - "You have a generic Doubtfire."

  • And Scottish, you've got like this really soft flutter

  • of an hour you can do,

  • and it's really soothing the way he's got it.

  • It's like a wee flick.

  • "Doubtfire."

  • - Are you wearing bug spray?

  • - Oh.

  • - Nattie.

  • - Oh, it's quite an idea.

  • No offense taken.

  • I was a little liberal with the atomizer.

  • - So it's really a hybrid accent.

  • It's got some British in it,

  • like "a little liberal" rather than "a little liberal,"

  • and Scottish accent,

  • you usually take down that short "ay" sound,

  • "the," which we would say "eh" like "little,"

  • and it would become level.

  • - All right, everyone.

  • It's time to expand your minds.

  • It's homework time.

  • - "All right, everyone.

  • "It's time to expand your minds."

  • That's all great.

  • "It's homework time."

  • That "oh."

  • That's more Scottish than it "oh"

  • that you'd have in an English accent.

  • - How about you Mrs. Doubtfire?

  • - Oh, you wicked, wicked man!