Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

AI 自動生成字幕
  • This is my compost bin. It's where I put used coffee grounds, melon rinds, corn husks;

    これは私の堆肥箱です。使用済みのコーヒーカス、メロンの皮、トウモロコシの殻を入れています。

  • pretty much anything that was a plant in its former life, along with shredded up newspapers,

    前世の植物だったものなら何でも、新聞の千切りと一緒に。

  • junk mail and pizza boxes. If I wait long enough, something kind of amazing happens.

    迷惑メールとピザの箱長く待っていると 何か驚くようなことが起こります

  • All that stuff is transformed into, well, what looks like ordinary dirt. But this dirt is

    すべてのものは、まあ、普通の土のように見えるものに変化します。しかし、この汚れは

  • anything but ordinary. This dirt is alive. Yes, it's full of earthworms. We'll get

    平凡なもの以外の何物でもないこの土は生きている。そうだ、ミミズだらけだ。私たちは

  • to them. But it's also full of millions of tiny creatures that you need a microscope

    彼らに。顕微鏡が必要な小さな生き物が 何百万匹もいます

  • to see. You wouldn't know by looking at them, but these little guys hold the key to

    を見てみましょう。見ているだけではわからないが、この小さな男たちが鍵を握っている。

  • human civilization. Without it, human life as we know it wouldn't be possible. Which makes

    人間の文明。それがなければ、私たちが知っているような人間の生活は成り立ちません。それは

  • it all the more puzzling when you discover that its number one enemy is us.

    その第一の敵が私たちであることを発見したとき、それはすべてのより多くの謎に包まれています。

  • So, not all dirt is created equal. It can have more or less of those little living creatures in it.

    だから、すべての土が同じように作られているわけではありません。多かれ少なかれ、小さな生き物が入っていることもあります。

  • And there's an easy way to tell even if you don't have a microscope at home.

    そして、自宅に顕微鏡がなくても簡単にわかる方法があります。

  • First, put about a handful of dirt in a clear glass jar. This is some soil I collected from the worm bin.

    まず、透明なガラス瓶に一握りくらいの土を入れます。これは、ミミズ入れで集めた土です。

  • Don't worry, I took out the worms later. And this I dug up from my backyard.

    心配しないで、後でミミズを取り出しました。そして、これは裏庭から掘り出してきたもの。

  • Next, add some water. Screw the lids on nice and tight, and shake them up. And now, we wait.

    次に水を入れます。蓋をしっかりとねじ込んで 振り上げますそして今、私たちは待っています。

  • OK, it's been a day, we're back, and we can see that both of our samples have separated

    一日経って戻ってきました。両方のサンプルが分離しているのがわかります。

  • into distinct layers. You can see that they look really different.

    はっきりとした層に本当に違って見えることがわかります。

  • Let's look closer at the dirt from the backyard. It has a bunch of stuff

    裏庭の土をよく見てみましょう。たくさんのものが入っています

  • on the bottom: gravel, sand, silt, and clay. This stuff floating at the top is called humus.

    底には砂利、砂、シルト、粘土などがありますこの上に浮いているものは 腐植と呼ばれています

  • That's where all the microscopic creatures live. Scientists call them microfauna: micro

    そこにはミクロの生き物が住んでいます。科学者は彼らをマイクロファウナと呼んでいます:マイクロ

  • for small, fauna for animals. There are millions of different kinds. When old plants die, the

    小動物にはファウナ、動物にはファウナ何百万種類もあります古い植物が枯れると

  • microfauna eat them and then, well, they poop. That waste is full of nutrients that

    微生物はそれを食べて、まあ、ウンチをします。そのウンチには栄養素がたっぷりと含まれていて

  • new baby plants need to grow. Grass, tomatoes, apple trees--- no matter the plant, the process

    新しい赤ちゃんの植物は成長する必要があります。草、トマト、リンゴの木---植物に関係なく、プロセス

  • is the same. And the more microfauna there are in the soil; eating, pooping, doing their

    は同じです。そして、土の中にいるより多くの微生物が、食べたり、ウンチをしたり、自分たちの

  • thingthe bigger and healthier the plants. Over millions of years, the new plants would

    植物が大きくて健康的であればあるほど何百万年もかけて 新しい植物は

  • use up nutrients in the soil, then the microfauna would replaced those nutrients by eating the

    土の中の栄養素を使い切ってしまうと、微生物はその栄養分を

  • dead plants. In mild climates, the microfauna could build up about two and a half centimeters, or one inch

    枯れた植物。温暖な気候では、微生物相は約2.5cm、1インチの大きさにまで成長します。

  • of humus every 500 years. Evolution continued and eventually produced a species who changed

    の腐植を500年ごとに進化は続き、最終的には

  • this process forever.

    このプロセスは永遠に

  • Homo sapiens have been around for almost 200,000 years, but we didn't

    ホモ・サピエンスは約20万年前から存在していたが、我々は

  • start farming until about 12,000 years ago. Before then, we still depended on healthy

    農業を始めたのは約1万2000年前までですそれ以前はまだ健康な

  • soil for food. The grass that fed the herd animals we hunted, the nut trees and berry

    食用の土。狩りをした群れの動物の餌となった草や、ナッツの木や実の

  • plants we foragedthese all grew from the rich humus that the microfauna created.

    私たちが採集した植物...これらはすべて、微生物が作り出した豊かな腐植から成長したものです。

  • Farming developed at various points in time, in different regions of the world. And from

    農業は世界の様々な地域で様々な時期に発展してきました。そして、その中から

  • the beginning, some of those early farmers recognized the relationship between healthy

    初期の農民たちの中には、健康的であることと健康的であることの関係を認識していた人もいましたが、現在では、そのようなことはありません。

  • soil and healthy plants. Like the Iroquois in the eastern part of what is now the United

    土と健康な植物。現在のアメリカ合衆国東部のイロコイ族のように

  • States. The first farmers there, women, by the way, planted corn atop mounds of

    州です。そこでの最初の農民は女性でした 女性がトウモロコシを

  • soil every spring. After they harvested the corn in the fall, they left the dead cornstalks

    毎年春になると土の中に秋にトウモロコシを収穫した後、彼らは死んだコーンタルクを残しました。

  • atop the mound. All winter long, the microfauna broke them down into nutrient-rich humus.

    マウンドの上で一冬の間、マイクロファウナが栄養豊富な腐植に分解してくれました。

  • The next spring's new baby corn plants would use those nutrients and start the cycle again.

    次の春の新しいベビーコーンの植物は、それらの栄養素を使用して、再びサイクルを開始します。

  • Iroquois farmers would also plant beans and squash in the same plot. Together, these three

    イロコイ族の農家も同じ区画に豆やスカッシュを植えていました。これら3つを合わせて

  • crops were known as thethree sisters.” Not only did this combination make for a balanced

    作物は「三姉妹」として知られていました。この組み合わせは、バランスのとれた

  • diet of protein, carbohydrates, and crucial vitamins for the Iroquois people, it also

    イロコイ族の人々のためのタンパク質、炭水化物、および重要なビタミンの食事、それはまた

  • kept the microfauna in the soil happy, healthy and pooping. Early farmers in other parts

    土の中のミクロファウナを幸せに、健康に、ウンチクに保っていました。他の地域の初期の農家

  • of the world developed different ways to feed the soil. Like in the Amazon river basin.

    世界の国々は土を養うために 様々な方法を開発しましたアマゾン川流域のように

  • Early farmers there used controlled fires to create patches of rich humus.

    初期の農家では、制御された火を使って、豊かな腐植のパッチを作っていました。

  • Today, if you dig deep into that soil, you can see that its much darker and healthier

    今日、その土を深く掘り下げてみると、より黒く健康的な土になっていることがわかります。

  • than the regular tropical soil nearby.

    近くにある普通の熱帯の土よりも

  • All over the world, the earliest farmers found ways to care for the

    世界中で、最も古い農家は、手入れの方法を見つけました。

  • soil so that it would produce healthy plants. But slowly, as European colonists descended

    健全な植物が育つように土壌を改良していました。しかし、ヨーロッパの入植者が降りてくると、ゆっくりと

  • on various parts of the world, these ancient practices gave way to a new type of farming.

    世界の様々な場所で、これらの古代の慣行は、新しいタイプの農業への道を与えました。

  • Machines like the steam engine and the power loom transformed life in Europe, and then in North

    蒸気機関や動力織機のような機械が、ヨーロッパの生活を、そして北欧の生活を一変させました。

  • America, starting in the mid-1700s. The lure of factory wages drew people from the countryside

    アメリカは1700年代半ばから始まりました工場の賃金の魅力に惹かれて 田舎から人が集まりました

  • into cities, which meant the farmers who stayed on the land needed to produce more food to

    そのため、土地に残った農民は、より多くの食料を生産する必要がありました。

  • be shipped to the cities. Farmers got stuck in a cycle of constant harvesting, without

    都市に出荷される農家は収穫のサイクルから抜け出せなくなりました

  • giving the soil time to regenerate the nutrients it had built up over generations. The soil

    世代を超えて積み上げてきた栄養素を土壌が再生するための時間を与えます。土が

  • quickly wore out, so they responded by cutting down forests and turning them into fields.

    すぐに消耗してしまうので、森を伐採して畑にすることで対応しました。

  • In North American, European settlers used violence to push the Iroquois and other indigenous people further west,

    北米では、ヨーロッパの入植者が暴力を使って、イロコイ族や他の先住民族を西に押しやった。

  • away from the three sisters fields that had sustained them for thousands of years. When

    何千年もの間 彼らを支えてきた 三姉妹の畑から離れていましたその時

  • they stripped that soil of its life, the settlers kept moving west, seizing indigenous lands

    耕作放棄地を剥奪しても、入植者は西進を続け、土着の土地を奪い取った。

  • along the way. New steel plows helped them break up the hard, heavy soils of the Great

    道のりに沿って新しい鋼鉄製のプラウは、彼らがグレートの硬く重い土壌を分解するのに役立ちました。

  • Plains. But these new steel plows did something else. They turned up the soil over and over again, which killed

    平原だしかし、これらの新しいスチールプラウは他のことをしました何度も何度も何度も土をひっくり返してしまい

  • a lot of those microfauna that had been living in the soil making humus. And when gasoline-powered

    土の中で腐植を作っていた多くの微生物が生息していましたガソリンエンジンで

  • tractors showed up in the early 1900s, their weight pressed down on the increasingly lifeless

    1900年代初頭に登場したトラクターは、その重さでますます生命力を失っていきます。

  • soil, making it even harder for plants to grow. By the 1930s, the soil of the Great

    土が植物の生育をさらに困難にしました1930年代までには、大

  • Plains had lost so much of its microfauna, giant dust storms pummeled the region. Thousands

    平野部は微生物の多くを失い、巨大な砂嵐がこの地域を襲いました。数千

  • of families lost their farms. This new type of farming wasn't limited to Europe

    農場を失った家族もいましたこの新しいタイプの農業は ヨーロッパだけではありませんでした

  • and North America. The small farms that had sustained the indigenous peoples of Central

    と北米。中央部の先住民を支えていた小規模農場は

  • and South America for generations had been replaced by giant mega-farms, haciendas, run

    と南米では、何世代にもわたって巨大なメガファームやハシエンダ、ランなどに取って代わられてきました。

  • by the Spanish and Portuguese settlers and worked by indigenous and enslaved people.

    スペイン人やポルトガル人の入植者によって、先住民や奴隷にされた人々が働いていました。

  • the crops didn't feed the people there. These fields were full of sugarcane and cotton to

    作物はそこの人々を養っていませんでしたこれらの畑はサトウキビと綿花でいっぱいでした

  • be shipped out of the country to factories. And, just like in North America, the overworked

    工場に出荷されるそして、北米と同じように、過労死した

  • soil quickly crumbled and started to wash away. In response, farmers around the world

    土はすぐに崩れて流され始めました。これを受けて、世界中の農家は

  • started to rely on chemical fertilizers, which help crops grow quickly, but can also pollute

    化学肥料に頼るようになりました。

  • drinking water and kill fish and other types of aquatic life. According to the United Nations,

    飲料水を汚染し、魚や他の種類の水生生物を殺してしまう可能性があります。国連によると

  • practices like this are killing the humus so quickly, we may run out of healthy soil

    腐葉土がすぐに枯れてしまうので、健康な土がなくなってしまうかもしれません。

  • in less than 60 years. That is, if we keep doing things the same way.

    60年足らずでつまり、同じやり方を続けていればですが

  • Remember the soil we tested, that these guys helped to make?

    私たちがテストした土を覚えていますか?この人たちが作るのを手伝ってくれました。

  • Look at it next to the jar of backyard soil. See how there's way more humus floating on the top? More of this stuff is exactly

    裏庭の土の瓶の横にあるのを見てください。腐植が上に浮いているのがわかりますか?腐植の量が増えているのは

  • what we need, all over the world, to replace the soil we've already destroyed.

    私たちが必要としているものは 世界中にあります 私たちがすでに破壊した土に代わるものです

  • And earthworms can help.

    そしてミミズが助けてくれる。

  • On farms where years of plowing has damaged the soil, a handful of farmers have stopped doing it.

    長年の耕作で土が傷んでいる農場では、一握りの農家がそれをやらなくなってしまった。

  • Instead, they roll down the old crop then use a series of drills to plant the new seeds

    その代わりに、古い作物を転がしてから、一連のドリルを使って新しい種を植えます。

  • underneath the old crop. Because this method doesn't disturb the soil, it gives earthworms

    古い作物の下にこの方法は土を乱さないので、それはミミズを与えます

  • a chance to make humus, and to create tunnels that help water get to plant roots. It also

    腐植を作るチャンスです 植物の根に水が届くのを助けるトンネルを作りますまた、それは

  • helps to loosen the soil so that plant roots can spread. But this method has been slow

    植物の根が広がるように土を緩めるのに役立ちます。しかし、この方法は

  • to catch on. Just one in four American farmers use it. On many smaller farms, though, earthworms

    をキャッチフレーズにしています。アメリカの農家の4人に1人しか使っていませんしかし、多くの小規模農場では、ミミズは

  • are a big part of the operation. This is our worm bin. These are the hardest workers, these

    が大きな役割を果たしています。これが私たちの虫箱ですこれらは最も働き者で、これらの

  • are actually red wriggler worms. This is Marc White. He showed me around his urban farm,

    実際には赤の蠢動虫ですこちらは マーク・ホワイト都会の農場を案内してくれました

  • right in the middle of Cleveland, Ohio.Here are the raspberries I talked about. Just pull

    クリーブランド、オハイオ州の真ん中にある、ここに私が話したラズベリーがあります。引っ張って

  • one off right there. Oh my gosh. Isn't that awesome? Everything is based on the soil. Everything that

    そこに一枚あらまあ、すごいでしょ?すべては土に基づいているすべてのものは

  • we eat is a reflection of the soil.

    私たちが食べているものは、土の反映です。

  • This right here, this is the black gold.

    これがブラックゴールドだ

  • On Marc's farm, that process starts here, in the compost

    マークの農場では、そのプロセスはここの堆肥から始まります。

  • pile. Over time, wood chips and food waste break down with the help of earthworms and

    を積み上げます。時間が経つと、木屑や生ゴミがミミズの力を借りて分解され

  • microfauna.

    微生物相。

  • So this is how the soil you saw inside, this is how it starts out.

    中で見た土はこうやって出てくるんですね。

  • In the next 10, 15, 20 years, this whole footprint will have been improved so much more for us

    次の10年、15年、20年後には、この全体のフットプリントは、私たちのために非常に多くの改善されているでしょう。

  • having been here.

    ここに来たことがある

  • We need healthy soil to grow healthy food, and we need healthy food

    健康な食べ物を育てるためには健康な土が必要であり、健康な食べ物を育てるためには

  • to grow healthy people. It's all connected.Dirt is so much more than the stuff beneath our

    健康な人を育てるためにすべてはつながっているのです。

  • feet. It's the stuff of life. And the sooner we realize that, the better off we'll be.

    足元を見てみましょう。それが人生の本質なんだそれに気づくのが早ければ早いほど、私たちは幸せになれる。

This is my compost bin. It's where I put used coffee grounds, melon rinds, corn husks;

これは私の堆肥箱です。使用済みのコーヒーカス、メロンの皮、トウモロコシの殻を入れています。

字幕と単語
AI 自動生成字幕

ワンタップで英和辞典検索 単語をクリックすると、意味が表示されます

B1 中級 日本語 Vox 植物 ミミズ 健康 生物 農場

汚れの秘密の歴史 (The secret history of dirt)

  • 4 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2020 年 09 月 03 日
動画の中の単語