Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • It was the night of August 4th, 1977.

    1977年8月4日の夜のことです。

  • "We won't move. We won't move."

    "私たちは動かない"動かない"

  • Thousands of protesters gathered in San Francisco.

    サンフランシスコには数千人の抗議者が集まった。

  • And formed a human barricade around this building to protect its residents.

    そして、この建物の周りに人間のバリケードを形成して住民を守っています。

  • "The police are on their way now. The police are on their way."

    "警察が向かっている"警察が向かっている"

  • It was about 11:00 o'clock.

    11時頃のことでした。

  • And some inside person called us and said they must be doing something,

    内部の人間から電話があり、何かしているに違いないと言われました。

  • The eviction is probably going to happen.

    立ち退きが起こるのではないでしょうか。

  • Hundreds of police in riot gear forced their way into a condemned hotel in San Francisco today.”

    "暴動服に身を包んだ数百人の警察がサンフランシスコの非難されたホテルに強制的に侵入しました"

  • Demonstrators formed a human barricade but it did not prevent police from using clubs and night sticks.”

    "デモ隊は人間のバリケードを形成しましたが、警察がクラブやナイトスティックを使用するのを防ぐことはできませんでした。"

  • Their orders: evict the last of the people living there.”

    "彼らの命令は、そこに住んでいる最後の人々を立ち退かせることです。"

  • For nearly ten years, this building,

    10年近く、この建物。

  • known as the International Hotel,

    インターナショナルホテルとして知られています。

  • had been at the heart of a historic battle for fair housing in San Francisco.

    サンフランシスコのフェアハウジングの歴史的な戦いの中心にいました。

  • This is not just an ordinary building.

    これは普通の建物ではありません。

  • You know, blood was spilled, battles were fought right on that street.

    血が流され、戦いが繰り広げられたのはあの通りだ

  • It housed hundreds of Filipinos who fought for their right to have a place to call home,

    故郷と呼べる場所を持つ権利のために戦った何百人ものフィリピン人が収容されていました。

  • in a city where they'd lived for decades.

    何十年も住んでいた街で

  • What happened that night changed the community

    あの夜の出来事が地域社会を変えた

  • and the shape of the city, forever.

    と街の形、永遠に。

  • While it's is now a part of Chinatownthis area of San Francisco used to beManilatown,”

    今でこそチャイナタウンの一部となっていますが、サンフランシスコのこのエリアはかつて「マニラタウン」と呼ばれていました。

  • one of the country's first Filipino American communities.

    国で最初のフィリピン系アメリカ人コミュニティの一つ。

  • But it wasn't your typical immigrant community.

    しかし、それはあなたの典型的な移民のコミュニティではありませんでした。

  • It was made up of mostly men.

    ほとんどが男性で構成されていました。

  • And that stemmed from a relationship between the US and the Philippines that ran deep.

    それはアメリカとフィリピンの関係の深さに起因しています。

  • After a brutal war over a century ago,

    一世紀以上前の残虐な戦争の後に

  • the US colonized the Philippines and controlled it up until 1946.

    アメリカはフィリピンを植民地化し、1946年までフィリピンを支配していた。

  • During that period, two major waves of Asian immigration occurred in the US:

    この間、アメリカでは2つの大きなアジア系移民の波が起こった。

  • first Chinese, and then largely Japanese migrants came to the US to work in mines, factories, on railroads and on farms.

    最初は中国人、そして大部分の日本人がアメリカに移住してきて、鉱山や工場、鉄道や農場で働くようになりました。

  • But over time both Chinese and Japanese immigrants

    しかし、時が経つにつれ、中国人も日本人も移民してきた。

  • faced racist backlashand were eventually barred from entering the country.

    人種差別的な反発に直面し、最終的には入国を禁止されました。

  • That created a demand for cheap labor, so the US turned to a new group: Filipinos.

    それが安い労働力の需要を生み出したので、アメリカは新しいグループに転向したのです。フィリピン人です

  • For the work is hard. And Filipinos and Mexicans are strong and can do it better.”

    "仕事は大変です。フィリピン人とメキシコ人は強いし、もっとうまくやれる。"

  • In the 1920s and 30s, the prospect of financial security lured over 100,000 Filipino men to the US.

    1920年代と30年代には、経済的な安全性の見通しが、10万人以上のフィリピン人男性をアメリカに誘いました。

  • When the U.S. took over the Philippines,

    アメリカがフィリピンを占領した時に

  • they were American nationals.

    彼らはアメリカ人だった

  • They felt like they were living the American dream.

    彼らはアメリカンドリームを生きているように感じていた。

  • But the reality of it was that they were extremely exploited and wages were really low.

    しかし、現実は極端に搾取されていて、賃金が本当に低かったのです。

  • Exploitation had many forms.

    搾取には様々な形がありました。

  • One of the most damaging repercussions for Filipino men settling in the US was isolation.

    アメリカに定住したフィリピン人男性にとって最もダメージの大きい影響の一つは、孤立でした。

  • US policies kept the workers from bringing their families over...

    アメリカの政策は労働者が家族を連れてこないようにしていた...

  • and also stopped them from marrying white women.

    と白人女性との結婚を阻止した。

  • They didn't build roots.

    彼らは根を張っていませんでした。

  • I call it social castration,

    私はそれを社会的去勢と呼んでいます。

  • but this was a way of again trying to keep them under control and being able to abuse their lives.

    しかし、これは再び彼らを支配下に置こうとし、彼らの生活を乱用することができるようにするための方法だったのです。

  • Then that's where the gender imbalance begins.

    ならば、そこから男女の不均衡が始まる。

  • Many of the Filipino men settled along the West Coast.

    フィリピン人男性の多くは、西海岸に沿って定住していました。

  • In San Francisco, about 30,000 of them, started forming a community here

    サンフランシスコでは、約3万人がここでコミュニティを作り始めました。

  • on a 10-block stretchright along the spine of Chinatown on Kearny Street.

    カーニー通りのチャイナタウンに沿って10ブロックに渡って。

  • It was the start of Manilatown.

    マニラタウンの始まりでした。

  • Outside of this area - Filipino workers found it hard to find any affordable housing...

    この地域の外では、フィリピン人労働者は、手頃な価格の住宅を見つけるのが難しいことがわかりました。

  • and that was by design. The city, at large, was strictly racially segregated.

    それは意図的なものだった街の大部分は 厳密に人種隔離されていました

  • As soon as they crossed the borders of Manilatown

    マニラタウンの国境を越えるとすぐに

  • like here, past Broadway and into surrounding white communitiesthey were shut out,

    - ここのように、ブロードウェイを通り抜けて、周辺の白人コミュニティに入っていくと、彼らは締め出されてしまうのです。

  • and denied apartments.

    と否定されたアパート。

  • And even if you walked two blocks that way

    2ブロック歩いたとしても

  • you could get beat up, even killed.

    殴られるかもしれないし、殺されるかもしれない。

  • They had white vigilante groups that would

    彼らには白人の自警団がいて

  • hunt them down, try to take them out of town, murder them.

    彼らを追い詰めて 街から連れ出そうとする 彼らを殺すんだ

  • That forced Filipino men to stay within the boundaries of Manilatown.

    そのためフィリピン人男性はマニラタウンの境界内に留まることを余儀なくされた。

  • But despite the constraints, they found a way to build a home for themselves.

    しかし、制約があるにもかかわらず、自分たちのために家を建てる方法を見つけたのです。

  • By the 1950s, they were part of an entire generation of aging men,

    1950年代までには、彼らは高齢化した男性の世代全体の一部となっていました。

  • who lived out their lives in the US.

    アメリカで人生を生き抜いた

  • They were called the Manong generation.

    彼らはマノン世代と呼ばれていました。

  • Manong is a Filipino word. It's a sign of endearment and respect,

    マノンはフィリピンの言葉です。敬意と尊敬の意を表しています。

  • to an older person

    年配の方に

  • In San Francisco's Manilatown, many of the manongs ended up living in residential hotels

    サンフランシスコのマニラタウンでは、マノンの多くが住宅用ホテルに住んでいました。

  • like this one called the International Hotel, or I-Hotel.

    インターナショナルホテルと呼ばれるこのようなもの、またはI-HOTELと呼ばれるもの。

  • The I-Hotel housed nearly 200 peoplelargely Filipino men, but some Chinese men, and women, too.

    I-Hotelには200人近くの人々が宿泊していました - 主にフィリピン人男性が、一部の中国人男性と女性も。

  • They lived in confined spaces, often in poor conditions.

    彼らは閉じ込められた空間に住んでいて、しばしば劣悪な条件の中で生活していました。

  • Even so...the I-Hotel and Manilatown provided

    それでも...I-ホテルとマニラタウンが提供してくれたのは

  • a sense of community, and belonging, to the residents.

    住民への帰属意識、共同体意識。

  • There were parlors, barber shops, places where people could play pool.

    パーラーや理髪店、プール遊びができる場所がありました。

  • Just places they could just call home, be around with their,

    彼らが家と呼べるような場所で、彼らと一緒にいられる。

  • we call themKababayans.” Like a brother.

    私たちは彼らを「カババヤ人」と呼んでいます。兄弟のように。

  • So then the hotels become these places where it's like family to them.

    そうすると、ホテルはこういった場所になり、家族のような場所になります。

  • But, their neighborhood was caught in the middle of a changing San Francisco.

    しかし、彼らの近所は、変化していくサンフランシスコの中に巻き込まれていた。

  • San Francisco has consistently been called one of the most expensive cities in the world to live.

    サンフランシスコは一貫して、世界で最も物価の高い都市の一つと呼ばれてきました。

  • With the influx of tech companies in recent few decades, it's struggled with massive affordable housing shortages.

    ここ数十年のハイテク企業の流入で、大規模な手頃な価格の住宅不足に悩まされています。

  • But the problems of urbanization didn't start with Silicon Valley.

    しかし、都市化の問題はシリコンバレーから始まったわけではありません。

  • It started in the1950s, with what was known as theManhattanizationof this part of downtown.

    それは1950年代、ダウンタウンのこの部分の「マンハッタン化」と呼ばれていたものから始まりました。

  • The city wanted a Wall Stof the west.

    街は西のウォール街を望んでいた。

  • And to make room for it -- they came up with a “master planfor the redevelopment of San Francisco.

    そのためのスペースを確保するために、彼らはサンフランシスコの再開発のための「マスタープラン」を考え出した。

  • This plan for urban renewal called  low-income neighborhoods "blighted districts and slums"

    この都市再生計画では、低所得者層の地域を「荒廃地区・スラム」と呼んでいました。

  • and asked for these areas to be razed and "rebuilt along modern lines."

    これらの地域は取り壊され、"近代的な線で再建されるように "と要求した。

  • In the Western Addition and Fillmore districts,

    西部追加地区とフィルモア地区で

  • the city evicted around 12,000 largely black and Asian American residents.

    市は約12,000人の主に黒人とアジア系アメリカ人の住民を追い出しました。

  • And here, in the South of Market area, roughly 4,000 people were evicted.

    そして、ここサウス・オブ・マーケット地区では、約4,000人が立ち退きを余儀なくされました。

  • The residents of Manilatown, right at the border of the growing financial district,

    成長を続ける金融街のちょうど境目にあるマニラタウンの住人たち。

  • knew they'd be targeted next.

    次に狙われるのは分かっていた

  • In 1968, the owner handed the tenants of the I-Hotel their first eviction notice.

    1968年、オーナーはIホテルの入居者に最初の立ち退き通知を手渡しました。

  • The real estate company wanted to demolish the building to make space for a parking lot.

    不動産会社は、駐車場のスペースを確保するために建物を解体したいと考えていました。

  • But, the tenants resisted.

    しかし、入居者は抵抗した。

  • Filipino community leaders and businesses joined the fight along with a growing number of local activists.

    フィリピン人コミュニティのリーダーや企業は、地元の活動家の数が増えていることに加えて、この戦いに参加しました。

  • Estella was one of the young activists on the front lines.

    エステラは第一線で活躍する若い活動家の一人だった。

  • These are pins from 1968 to 1984.

    1968年から1984年までのピンズです。

  • That's `Ipaglaban` means `fight for` the International Hotel.

    イパグラバン`は、`国際ホテルのために戦う`という意味です。

  • After months of protests... the owner and tenants agreed to a new three-year lease in 1969.

    数ヶ月間の抗議の後...オーナーと賃借人は 1969年に 新しい3年契約に合意した

  • But it was a temporary fix.

    しかし、それは一時的なものでした。

  • By the 1970s, redevelopment efforts moved further and further into Manilatown.

    1970年代になると、再開発の取り組みはマニラタウンへとどんどん進んでいきました。

  • It nearly swallowed the entire community and threatened the I-hotel once again.

    それはコミュニティ全体を飲み込みそうになり、再びI-hotelを脅かした。

  • All the other hotels where many of the other elderly lived were already being demolished.

    他の高齢者が多く住んでいたホテルは、すでにすべて取り壊されていました。

  • They were already being evicted. So it was like dominos in some ways.

    すでに追い出されていました。だからある意味ドミノ倒しのようなものでした。

  • In 1973 the owner of I-hotel sold the building to a Thai developer

    1973年、I-hotelの所有者はタイのデベロッパーに建物を売却しました。

  • and that reignited the eviction battle.

    それが立ち退きの戦いを再燃させた。

  • For the next four years, inside the courtroom and on the streets,

    これからの4年間、法廷の中や街頭で。

  • protesters fought three more eviction notices.

    抗議者はさらに3つの立ち退き通知を争った。

  • Asian American groups, religious groups, labor rights groups, and dozens of others all came together

    アジア系アメリカ人グループ、宗教団体、労働者権利団体、その他数十人が一堂に会して

  • in a show of solidarityfor low income housing.

    - 低所得者向け住宅のための連帯表示で。

  • But for Filipino residentsit was also a fight to claim what little space they had, in a city that was trying to erase them.

    しかし、フィリピンの住民にとっては、それは彼らを消そうとしている都市で、彼らが持っているわずかなスペースを主張するための戦いでもありました。

  • In the summer of 1977, the tenants of the I-Hotel were served another eviction notice.

    1977年の夏には、I-Hotelのテナントは、別の立ち退き通知を送達された。

  • On August 3rd, a news reporter leaked information to tenants and supporters

    8月3日、報道記者が入居者や支援者に情報を漏らした。

  • that the police might actually be coming that night.

    - その夜に警察が来るかもしれないと

  • The police and the sheriff's department were gathering.

    警察と保安官が集まっていた。

  • It was still a threat, but yet we thought, maybe this is it.

    それはまだ脅威であったが、それでも私たちは思った、もしかしたらこれがそうなのかもしれないと。

  • Because if they're gathering somewhere and it's in the middle of the night, it's probably going to be a surprise.

    だって、どこかに集まっていて、それが夜中になっていたら、サプライズになるかもしれませんよ。

  • I was the president of the International Hotel Tenants Association.

    国際ホテルテナント協会の会長をしていました。

  • I felt that a lot of us felt fear. But I had to calm people.

    多くの人が恐怖を感じていると感じました。でも、私は人を落ち着かせなければならなかった。

  • I had to tell them that this is what standing up means, we meant we meant what we said,

    これが立ち上がることの意味だと伝えなければならなかった、私たちは自分たちが言ったことを意味していたのだ。

  • we're not going to move. You're going to have to carry us out.

    私たちは動かないわ私たちを運び出してください。

  • The sheriffs are simply going to have to drive us out of this building.

    "保安官は単純にこの建物から追い出すしかない。

  • That's the way we see it.”

    "それが我々の見方だ"

  • On the night of August 4th, tenant leaders set off a “red alert”,

    8月4日の夜、入居者のリーダーが「赤色警報」を発令した。

  • and over two thousand protesters gathered on Kearny Street.

    と2000人以上の抗議者がカーニー通りに集まりました。

  • Many formed a human barricade, locking arms outside the I-Hotel.

    多くの人が人間のバリケードを作り、Iホテルの外で腕をロックしています。

  • While others were stationed inside with the remaining I-Hotel tenants.

    他の人たちは、残りのI-ホテルのテナントと一緒に内部に配置されていました。

  • When the police arrivedon foot and on horses —  they launched into the crowds

    警察が到着したとき、徒歩と馬に乗って、彼らは群衆の中に立ち上がった。

  • with batons.

    バトンで

  • I was upstairs inside the building. And so was Emil.

    私はビルの中の2階にいたエミルもいた

  • And we also locked arms inside here.

    ここでは腕を組んでいた

  • When I started hearing the clack clack clack of the horses,

    馬のカチャカチャという音が聞こえるようになったとき。

  • that's when I knew that there was

    その時に知ったのが

  • something was afoot.

    何かが進行中だった

  • It was really scary. We had mattresses on the windows and on the doors.

    本当に怖かったです。窓やドアの上にマットレスを敷いていました。

  • People were saying, “we won't move, we won't move.”

    みんな "動かない、動かない "と言っていました。

  • Eventually, using a fire truck ladderthe police entered the building through the roof.

    結局、消防車のはしごを使って-警察は屋根から建物に入った。

  • And we hear shouting and screaming from upstairs.

    そして、二階から叫び声と叫び声が聞こえてきます。

  • But because everything is closed off, it's kind of like muffled.

    でも、すべてが閉ざされているので、なんだかモフモフしているような感じがします。

  • Once inside, the police were confronted by more protestersincluding Emil.

    中に入ると、警察はエミルを含む多くの抗議者と対峙していた。

  • But ultimately I just got beaten up.

    でも最終的にはボコボコにされただけ。

  • Dragged down the stairs, dragged down the street, Kearny Street and dropped off like I was a limp doll.

    階段を引きずり降ろされ、カーニー通りを引きずり降ろされ、足の不自由な人形のように落ちていった。

  • The fact that they're hurting people, that they just hurt Emil De Guzman, chairperson of the IHTA, they're going to be removing the senior citizens who are now in their rooms with medics.

    人を傷つけているということは、IHTAの会長であるエミール・デ・グスマンを傷つけただけで、今、部屋にいる高齢者を衛生士と一緒に追い出すことになります。

  • It's the last stop of the low income housing struggle here at the International Hotel.

    低所得者向け住宅闘争の終着点はここ国際ホテルです。

  • After making it through the crowd of protesters, the police used axes to open up the doors to rooms.

    抗議者の群衆の中を通り抜けた後、警察は斧を使って部屋のドアを開けた。

  • In the end, to put a stop to this rampage,

    最終的には、この暴挙に歯止めをかけるために。

  • the tenants decided to stand down.

    入居者は身を引くことにしました。

  • They walked out one by one, each elder accompanied by an activist.

    長老が活動家に付き添われて、一人ずつ外に出て行った。

  • By the next morning, the streets were cleared out.

    翌朝までには、街は一掃されていた。

  • Emil's face was plastered all over national newspapers.

    エミルの顔は全国紙に掲載された。

  • This is the actual photo of the eviction.

    これが実際の立ち退きの写真です。

  • I mean the next day you see it in The New York Times,The Boston Globe. I mean, you see this all over the world.

    次の日にはニューヨークタイムズや ボストングローブ紙に掲載されてる世界中で見られるんだよ

  • People carried from the building were young demonstrators who had occupied some of the vacant rooms.”

    "ビルから運ばれてきたのは 若いデモ隊で 空き部屋を占拠していました"

  • Tenants were rushed out of the building. Many of them so quickly they left everything behind.”

    "テナントは急いで建物の外に出た"彼らの多くはすぐにすべてを残していった"

  • But the national attentionwas too late.

    しかし、全国的に注目されたのは...遅かった。

  • It couldn't change what happened that nightor its repercussions.

    その夜に起きたことやその影響は変えられなかった。

  • The fight to save the last remnant of Manilatown, was shut down.

    マニラタウンの最後の名残を救うための戦いは、シャットダウンされた。

  • And the I-Hotel tenants, were homeless.

    Iホテルの入居者はホームレスだった

  • The city claimed to have set up replacement housing for the tenants,

    市は入居者のために代替住宅を設置したと主張している。

  • but there were no such accommodations.

    が、そのような宿泊施設はありませんでした。

  • That was just a lie. There wasn't any place for them to goThey were kicked out into the street.

    それはただの嘘だった。彼らが行くところはなかった。通りに追い出された

  • We had to find makeshift places where they could sleep.

    その場しのぎの場所を探さなければなりませんでした。

  • Some of them collapsed.

    倒れたものもありました。

  • And I think what I really saw more than anything is how broken hearted they were because

    そして、私が何よりも見たのは、彼らがどれほど心を痛めていたかということだと思います。

  • their family, you know their community was destroyed.

    彼らの家族は、彼らのコミュニティが破壊されたことを知っています。

  • The I-Hotel remained vacant for nearly two years, before it was demolished.

    I-Hotelは、取り壊される前に、約2年間空室のままでした。

  • The tenants were scattered throughout the city.

    入居者は街中に散らばっていました。

  • And Manilatown, was destroyed.

    マニラタウンは破壊された

  • We don't we don't have the presence in this city.

    この街には存在感がないんです。

  • We've been here over many over a hundred years.

    100年以上も前からここに来ています。

  • But we're overshadowed,

    でも、影になってしまっている。

  • we kind of still remain very invisible.

    私たちは、まだ非常に見えないままです。

  • In 2005, nearly 30 years after the original battle for the I-Hotel

    2005年、当初のI-HOTELの争奪戦から30年近くが経過しています。

  • Manilatown and Chinatown activists accomplished a decades-long effort to build a new I-Hotel.

    マニラタウンとチャイナタウンの活動家たちは、新しいIホテルを建設するための数十年にわたる努力を達成しました。

  • Today, it contains 104 units of dedicated affordable housing for senior citizens.

    今日では、104ユニットの高齢者専用の手頃な価格の住宅が含まれています。

  • This building carries the legacy of its community, and its struggle

    この建物は、その地域社会の遺産と闘争を...

  • One that still resonates in a city with a deepening affordable housing crisis.

    手頃な価格の住宅危機が深まった街に、今も響く一本。

  • The failure of the city always was that they failed to build affordable housing, decent housing.

    市の失敗はいつも手ごろな価格の住宅、まともな住宅を建てられなかったことです。

  • It's the failure of a system that prioritizes property rights over human rights.

    人権より財産権を優先した制度の失敗だな。

  • I feel hopeful because I know that there's a new generation who's thinking about these things.

    こういうことを考えている新しい世代がいることを知っているので、希望を感じます。

  • But it's only possible if you have that idea that housing is a human right.

    でも、住宅は人権だという考えを持っていれば可能なんですよね。

It was the night of August 4th, 1977.

1977年8月4日の夜のことです。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 Vox フィリピン マニラ ホテル タウン 住宅

サンフランシスコはどのようにして近所を消し去ったのか

  • 1 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2020 年 08 月 07 日
動画の中の単語