Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • you're watching.

  • Chalk and Talk by Brian Roads Brought to You by business English pod dot com Let's take a look at the three conditional These air your basic condition.

  • ALS number one.

  • We're gonna call it the first conditional.

  • Some books call it the Riel or probable Conditional.

  • Let's just stick to the 1st 1 Okay?

  • If it rains, we will cancel the picnic.

  • Now take a look at these verb tenses we have in the If clause we have the simple present noticed that it's still indicating a future.

  • And then we have the simple future.

  • Over here we will cancel.

  • So the idea is it could rain.

  • There's a possibility of it.

  • It's probably going to happen.

  • And so we used the first conditional with probable conditional.

  • You can always put the if clause later in the sentence, as I've done in my second example, for the first conditional here, we will go on a picnic if it doesn't rain.

  • Here's your if clause at the end, so you could put them at the beginning with a comma or at the end and notice there's no common there.

  • The second conditional is also known as the improbable or unreal?

  • Conditional.

  • We're gonna call it the second conditional.

  • Let's take a look at this.

  • If I were you, I'd get more rest.

  • I'd buy you a new car if I were rich.

  • Those two are the improbable Conditional.

  • In other words, it's impossible for me to be you.

  • But if this actually took place, this is what would happen.

  • Same thing here.

  • A my rich.

  • No, But if I were rich Now, of course you're gonna notice immediately.

  • The verbs here were and were with I formally people use were in the second conditional.

  • Some people will say waas, and that's sort of an informal way of using it.

  • Lots of people use it, however, so let's take a look again.

  • If I were you, I'd get more rest.

  • I'd is actually the short form of the contraction of wood.

  • So it goes.

  • If I were you, I would get more rest.

  • I'd get more rest.

  • So we have in the If clause, we have the word.

  • And then in the other clause, we have the wood.

  • 2nd 1 the second example here.

  • I'd buy you a new car if I were rich and I just switched them around.

  • If I were rich, I'd buy you a new car.

  • Once again.

  • This is would buy and this is were rich.

  • Is it true?

  • No, but imagine.

  • And finally we get to the third conditional.

  • This is the past improbable.

  • It didn't happen.

  • It's too late for it happened because it happened in the past or it would have happened in the past.

  • But it didn't.

  • So we go into the past.

  • Improbable.

  • It's impossible now.

  • But imagine if if I hadn't gone to that party years ago.

  • This would, for example, I met my wife at university at a party.

  • And if I hadn't gone to that party, well, we wouldn't be married now.

  • So that's what this is about.

  • If I hadn't gone to that party years ago, I wouldn't have met my future wife.

  • Now noticed the verb tenses here hadn't gone.

  • We have a past perfect.

  • And then, in this case, we have wood plus a the past of wood which was would plus the present perfect.

  • So let's take a look again.

  • If I hadn't gone to that party years ago, I wouldn't have met my future wife or I wouldn't have met my future wife if I hadn't gone to that party years ago.

  • So the verb tenses are all different in these three examples.

  • The first conditional the probable one.

  • Look at that one.

  • We will.

  • If it rains, we will explain if I were you.

  • And quite often this is used.

  • If I were you, I would get more rest.

  • If I hadn't gone, I wouldn't have met.

  • So these three conditional indicate different futures are sorry.

  • These three condition ALS indicate different time frames.

  • And this is the usual set up.

  • There are variations, but this is the usual way that grammar books will present them.

  • Before I talk about the grammar in this sentence, I would like to emphasize that there are lots of mistakes in this sentence.

  • Okay, so this is incorrect grammar who talks like this or who writes like this Native English speakers, especially in North America.

  • They get confused on past participles versus simple past and would have should have could ah, in the condition als and so on.

  • So let's take a look at this example.

  • I'll just read it first.

  • If I would have went there, I would've drank Pepsi all night.

  • Now This is completely wrong for the third conditional, as we've discussed and the third conditional is the past Improbable went to went.

  • There would be a party, for example, and I didn't drink coke.

  • I drank Pepsi all night.

  • So trying to get this idea across the people, some native English speakers will say, if I would have went there now what's wrong with that?

  • Well, according to the grammar that we've been over already, this should be if I had gone there to the party.

  • So why would somebody choose would in the if clause when there's never a wooden?

  • If Klaus Why this mistake?

  • Well, when you go contracted, I'd had looks the same as would.

  • So when they expanded again, they end up with wood and after would comes The infinitive have, like the presence perfect coming up.

  • But then they get the went and then gone confused past part of simple versus the simple past.

  • So they stick that winning as well.

  • So in this case that had or the wood is confusing and in this part of it, the went in the gone are confusing and then we continue on with some problems here.

  • I would have drank once again in this example.

  • Anyway, the simple past is used instead of the present.

  • Perfect or sorry, they past participle and this should be drunk.

  • Now, why would people get that confused?

  • Well, when you're brought up in an English speaking country, you might consider this an adjective.

  • Drunk is somebody who has had too much alcohol to drink.

  • He is drunk, so they want to avoid that.

  • So they put in the simple past in the situation where they should have the past participle.

  • Now, I think you know that.

  • So it should be I would have drunk Pepsi all night it, for example, instead of Coca Cola.

  • So the mistakes here are from hyper correcting.

  • A lot of things are end of course, confusion between these two, these two and these two.

you're watching.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

A2 初級

上級英文法ESLレッスン - 条件式 (Advanced English Grammar ESL Lesson - Conditionals)

  • 2 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語