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  • Hi, everybody.

  • My name is Alicia.

  • Welcome back to top words.

  • Today we're going to talk about 10 phrases for gossip.

  • Let's go.

  • Oh, my God.

  • So the first phrase is Oh, my God.

  • So so Oh, my God.

  • So is, ah, introductory phrase you can use to start your topic with, like, a surprise factor.

  • So you say, Oh, my God.

  • And then so is your transition phrase.

  • So, for example Oh, my God.

  • So I have to tell you about this movie I saw or Oh, my God.

  • So I saw my neighbor in the shopping mall this morning or oh, my God.

  • So did you see a My new dog?

  • It's kind of weird, but usually it's about a person, not about a dog.

  • But who knows?

  • You won't believe what happened to me the other day.

  • The next expression is you won't believe what happened to me the other day.

  • You won't believe what happened to me the other day.

  • Meaning something happened to you.

  • And you think it's going to be a surprise to the person listening to you.

  • You won't believe what happened to me the other day.

  • So it's a very fast phrase because it sounds like you want to share very quickly.

  • Like you won't believe what happened to me.

  • You can drop the other day if you want.

  • Or you said you can say you won't believe what happened to me this morning.

  • You won't believe what happened to me last night.

  • You won't believe it happened to me this weekend.

  • You won't believe what happened me over my winter vacation so that you won't believe what happened to me gets very, very quick and short.

  • So examples Uh, you won't believe what happened to me the other day.

  • I ran into my ex boss or you won't believe what happened to the other day.

  • I tripped and fell down a flight of stairs or you won't believe what happened to me the other day.

  • I got a new parents.

  • Sure.

  • I don't know.

  • Maybe one of you can use that.

  • Guess what?

  • The next phrase is very short.

  • The next phrases like an exclamation.

  • So an excited statement and a question.

  • Guess what.

  • Guess what?

  • So guess what is inviting the listener to guess what happened to you.

  • Guess what the full question would be.

  • Guess what happened or guess what happened to me.

  • But we Onley say, Guess what?

  • So guess what.

  • And sometimes the listener guesses.

  • And sometimes the listener just says what?

  • Usually the listener just says.

  • What asked?

  • So meaning you should continue the story.

  • So if you said guess what?

  • I quit my job.

  • Or guess what?

  • I saw my best friend with a new guy I haven't seen before.

  • Uh, another example.

  • Uh, guess what?

  • I got a new car, something like that.

  • So some kind of shocking like, um, difficult to guess situation.

  • I haven't told you about this yet.

  • The next expression is I haven't told you about this yet.

  • I haven't told you about this yet, so has not becomes Haven't I haven't told you about this yet, So maybe you've told you have told other people.

  • But this specific person, Maybe you have not told that person your news or some information yet, but this yet implies you were planning to or you want to tell them this.

  • So it's it's kind of creates a little suspense.

  • I haven't told you about this yet, so we could use this like I haven't told you about this yet.

  • I'm going to France next summer, or I haven't told you about this yet.

  • But I broke up with my boyfriend last night or I haven't told you about this yet, but I'm throwing a big party for my co worker this weekend.

  • Can you come?

  • Other examples haven't told you about this yet.

  • I saw my boss out for dinner with someone who's not his wife.

  • Oh.

  • Oh, I got this more true.

  • That's not O.

  • R.

  • I haven't told you about this yet.

  • I heard that the company is gonna go bankrupt.

  • Oh, also not true.

  • OK, so those there is in pretty juicy, juicy gossip.

  • That's an expression we use.

  • We say juicy gossip is something that's like, really, really interesting gossip for a really interesting story about people we say juicy gossip for that.

  • Have you heard about the next expression is Have you heard about blah, blah, blah?

  • Have you heard about can be followed with a noun phrase?

  • Have you heard about Ah, a person you can use a person or have you heard about a situation you can use both.

  • You can use an object.

  • Do so Have you heard about the new iPhone or have you heard about the new office policies?

  • Um, you can use that, um, for pretty much anything you want to inform your listener about.

  • So have you heard about is usually said very quickly.

  • Have you heard about So the U becomes shortened to Yeah.

  • Have you heard about Have you heard about Global Block?

  • So have you heard about the new secretary?

  • Have you heard about our new boss?

  • Or have you heard about my coworker quitting his job?

  • Have you heard about the neighbors above us?

  • Through moving?

  • So you can use people here for gossip expressions?

  • Or you can use objects in this expression just to introduce something new.

  • Very useful phrase.

  • Have you heard about my mom?

  • Sorry, Mom.

  • I don't know why you came to that one.

  • OK, so the other day, the next expression is kind of like the beginning to a story.

  • So maybe this can be for gossip.

  • Maybe it can just be like a story.

  • Something that interesting.

  • Or maybe boring That happened to you.

  • The expression is so the other day.

  • So the other day, so the other day the other day here means not today, some other day, which day?

  • It doesn't really matter.

  • It's not really important.

  • But we say the other day someday in the past, this expression is used for so we can say so.

  • The other day I was sitting at my desk in the office when my manager came and asked if he could speak to me, that the done or so.

  • The other day I was shopping and I'm ran into Max boyfriend or so The other day I was renting a car, and the former president of the United States came into the car rental shop.

  • What?

  • All right, so the other day, just someday in the past.

  • So I was talking with and the next one you can use, Um, maybe for gossip sometimes.

  • But also you can use for making plans.

  • It's so I was talking with someone and blah, blah, blah.

  • So I was talking with someone means you were having a conversation at another time with a person, and you want to kind of report information or share something from that conversation with the person listening now, so I might say so.

  • I was talking with Theresa, and I think that we should plan a party for this weekend.

  • What do you think?

  • So I was talking with my team about this, and I think that we should make some changes.

  • So that's a very kind of everyday work situation.

  • Use of this phrase, Um, but you can also use it for gossip like So I was talking to my best friend and I think I'm gonna move or I was talking to my parents, and I think it's best if we break up rule so it could be for plans.

  • It can be for gossip.

  • It can be for just any conversation, plus a report.

  • What's up with the next expression is kind of a little like mysterious than the expression is.

  • What's up with blah, blah, blah.

  • Usually, what's up with person for gossip?

  • Meaning there's like the nuance here.

  • Is there some problem where it seems like something's wrong with this person?

  • They're unhappy.

  • They're sad there, angry, some kind of negative emotion.

  • We use this like, What's up with Stevens?

  • I haven't heard from him lately.

  • What's up with your brother, he seems really upset.

  • Or what's up with your neighbor?

  • Why is he so noisy?

  • Or what's up with your boss?

  • He's so strict, so it sounds like there's some problem.

  • We usually use this intonation.

  • What's up with what's up with?

  • No to introduce somebody who has a problem.

  • We don't say what's up.

  • It's not that it's not that sort of Hello, Um, expression.

  • It's ah, it's an expression for a problem.

  • You can also use a noun phrase that is not a person here like what's up with this new office policy?

  • Or what's up with this new rule at work?

  • Or what's up with this new item on the menu at this restaurant?

  • It's super weird.

  • So what's up with global Blah has sort of a negative nuance.

  • You can use it for people to talk about strange behavior.

  • What's up with you?

  • Have you heard from lately?

  • The next expression is Have you heard from Bubble Block lately?

  • Have you heard from person lately?

  • Have you heard from Stevens lately?

  • I haven't seen him.

  • Have you heard from your mom lately?

  • Have you heard from your dad lately?

  • Have you heard from your brother?

  • lately.

  • Have you heard from your landlord lately?

  • I don't know why you hear from your landlord, but have you heard from someone lately?

  • There is sort of like a little bit of an expectation that you are in contact with the person involved in this sentence.

  • Like you have some relationship.

  • Maybe it's a family relationship.

  • Romantic relationship, professional relationship.

  • There's some relationship with this person and lately is like, Have you heard from them recently?

  • Lately?

  • In the last few days in the last few weeks, So you can use this If, for example, you are looking for someone or you're worried about someone, you can use this here.

  • You can also use it just just to check in about some other person without asking that person directly.

  • So, like, if I want to ask about, I'm using recent my example.

  • Recess are Japanese Channel host.

  • Um, if I want to ask about how Resa is, but I don't want to ask Teresa.

  • I know maybe she's busy or I don't know.

  • For some reason I difficult to talk to her.

  • I can ask like I co worker and then say, Hey, have you heard from recently leash it seems she's really busy or have you heard from so and so lately?

  • It seems they're busy.

  • So if I want to ask about another person, but I don't want to bother this person or that something makes it difficult I can use.

  • Have you heard from blah, blah, blah recently or lately to ask about them?

  • Very useful phrase I have to tell you about next expression.

  • Uh, the next expression is I have to tell you about blah, blah, blah.

  • I have to tell you so half to becomes hafta I have to tell you about Has a nice room sound I have to tell you about Papua are I have to tell you about something So I have to tell you about my weekend.

  • I have to tell you about Stevens I have to tell you about my mom had to tell you about.

  • My boyfriend has to tell you about my girlfriend.

  • Whatever it is some person used at the end of this sentence creates a nuance like there's exciting news about that person, or I have to tell you about this thing that happened.

  • You can use a situation at the end of the sentence to but you're using.

  • I have to at the beginning of this sentence, so that sounds like it's really important.

  • Like I feel it's so important.

  • It's my responsibility to tell you, because this is so exciting.

  • Of course, you can use this and more boring situations as well.

  • Like I have to tell you about the new office policy.

  • You can use it in that way with a very flat intonation.

  • But for gossip purposes used I have to tell you about.

  • That.

  • Sounds really good.

  • So what do you have to tell somebody about?

  • I have to tell you about this new idea I have for a business.

  • Or I have to tell you about what happened to me last night.

  • OK, so there are these really exciting ways that we can introduce things that happened or that we can talk about people or winter.

  • Okay, So those are 10 phrases that you can use four gossip.

  • I hope that those air useful.

  • I hope you don't gossip too much.

  • I don't really like to gossip that much, but sometimes it's a little bit useful, So give them a try.

  • If you want to try them out a little bit.

  • You can do so in the comments section below the video for sure.

  • If you like this video, please make sure to give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel to check us out of English Class one no one dot com for more good stuff as well.

  • Thank you very much for watching this episode of top boards and I will see you again to fight.

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ゴシップのための10のフレーズ (10 Phrases for Gossip in English)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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