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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English.

  • Hello, and welcome to news Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

  • Hi, I'm Shaan.

  • And joining me today is Katherine.

  • Hi, Katherine.

  • Hi, Sean.

  • Hi, everybody.

  • What story do you have for us today?

  • Today?

  • Some.

  • We have a story about a very hot topic.

  • Can you guess what it is?

  • Let's find out from this.

  • BBC Radio Four News bulletin 2016 is on course to be the warmest year on record, and it will be the third year in a row that a new record has been set.

  • The findings were announced at a meeting of the U.

  • N Weather Agency's The World Meteorological Organization in Marrakech.

  • In Morocco, climate scientists said that although the El Nino weather phenomenon had had an impact, carbon emissions were the most significant factor.

  • 16 of the 17 warmest years in history have been recorded this century, so a story there about the earth's temperature on 2016 is almost definitely going to be the hottest year since humans started recording the temperature peso A worrying story.

  • It's quite serious Yeah, on So what?

  • Words and phrases are being used by new sites online to talk about this story.

  • Okay, well, we're going to look at two groups of words.

  • The first group of three words all have a very similar meaning and the words are sweltering, sizzling on scorching.

  • Our second group of phrases also have very similar meanings to each other.

  • And they are on course on track, on on pace.

  • Okay.

  • And how were the first group of words appearing in the new stories?

  • Okay, so let's look at the headlines and we have global news.

  • Website tells us scorching 2016 on pace to be hottest year on record.

  • Secondly, from the Australian website In daily, we have sweltering 2016 to set heat record on In the story itself, we're told the world is set to notch up a new heat record in 2016 after a sizzling 2015.

  • All right, so we have scorching, sizzling and sweltering, which are all extreme adjectives, Meaning very, very, very hot.

  • Very, very, very hard.

  • Yes, on they all have pretty much a similar meaning Is not ones more extreme than the other, is it?

  • No, not at all.

  • All of the mean very, very, very hot.

  • They're not particularly graded.

  • So if you want to describe a situation where something is extremely hot, use the one use your favorite might.

  • Nice, because headlines convey vary their language with all these different synonyms they do.

  • And they're all quite dramatic as well.

  • Good for headlines.

  • Yeah, and as their extreme, we have to use an extreme adverbs.

  • We can't use very sweltering.

  • Can we not?

  • It'll know you would say absolutely scorching.

  • Now we've both got quite thick jumpers on today.

  • Well, it was Hold on the way to work this morning I waas in this office.

  • It's sweltering with all the light it is.

  • Yes, it is, Actually, I'm feeling quite warm as well.

  • Yeah, Patmore than quite warm.

  • This office this studio is sweltering, sweltering, scorching, sizzling on now sizzled.

  • What the what?

  • The verb sizzle makes me think of bacon sausages cooking.

  • You get a frying pan in particular.

  • So if you've got a pan, you're cooking it in a lots of oil in the pan and something that's quite fatty.

  • So when you put it in the pan, it goes spitting and hissing bubbling and smelling lovely, and the noise it makes in particular sounds like the word sizzle.

  • So sizzle means cooking something so that it's spitting and making a lot of frying noise.

  • So sausages sizzle, sizzle.

  • You're making me hungry.

  • I'm getting quite hungry as well.

  • Okay, so let's move on to the next group.

  • Yeah, that's then what do we have for the next group of words?

  • Okay, so let's go back to our headlines on We're looking at USA Today 2016 on track for hottest year on record.

  • Al Jazeera tellers 2016 on course to be hottest year on record on our final one.

  • Back to global news on, we have scorching 2016 on pace to be hottest year on record.

  • So almost identical headlines there, which tells her that the woods are probably pretty similar.

  • Yes, so we have on course on track and on pace.

  • Yep, and they mean happening in the way we expect, based on what's been happening until now, exactly that, Yes, so there's a kind of you know what's gonna happen.

  • The result will be because of what happened leading up to this moment.

  • Often it's used for plans So for plans, all things you want to happen.

  • So, for example, your school you want to get a final grade A at the end of the year.

  • If you look at all your essays and your great you've had so far, but maybe four A's and two B's.

  • So looking at that, you're likely to get a final grader.

  • You're on course to get a final Grade eight because you've had quite a few Grade A's up till now, so it's often quite positive.

  • But in these stories, it's not positive uses.

  • They used for something quite negative.

  • It is, and it's quite unusual, But I think it works, and they've used it because we're talking about the hottest year on record.

  • So it's kind of record is actually something that's never been done before, and often that's quite positive.

  • Think of Olympic athletes breaking records, so even though this result will be negative, we're using it in this kind of record way.

  • So, generally speaking on course and on track off a positive things here, it's being played around with a little bit.

  • Yeah, and we're using it here because 2016 isn't over yet.

  • We're in November so we can't say for definite because something may happen.

  • Yep, we may have a cold spell in in December.

  • Yeah, it may change it, but it's yucking likely.

  • It's looking very, very likely.

  • And that's a key with on course.

  • On track on Pace is looking very likely none coursing on track, a much more common not later than on pace.

  • Yeah, much more common.

  • Yes, on course.

  • On track.

  • Those are the ones we will see more often.

  • The newspapers chills on pace, but I think it's less less common.

  • Yeah, and it kind of if you think about the literal meaning of a course and track, it makes sense.

  • Doesn't execute on course on track.

  • You on a journey somewhere on a route.

  • Yeah, course under path are often literally like pavements, or you go to a stadium.

  • There's a running track where athletes runs.

  • It was literally what you move on.

  • Yeah, on what follows.

  • If we want to use a noun or a verb, what structure do we use yet?

  • We're with on course, and on truck you can use.

  • You can follow them by four plus a noun phrase, or you can follow them both by to be and a verb phrase, and it's the same for on pace, but again, just a little more unusual to see those structures.

  • Okay, thank you very much.

  • Now, before we recap, let's look at our Facebook challenge.

  • So we asked you.

  • We've been exploring some idioms related to track, which these track idioms can we use when we travel to places where not many people go a make tracks be lose track or C go off the beaten track?

  • What kind of responses did we have?

  • Fantastic responses.

  • Always.

  • We caught a few people out with make tracks.

  • A few people thought that the answer was make tracks that wasn't quite correct.

  • The answer we were looking for was answer C, which was, um, off the go off the beaten track for well done.

  • John Lopez, Aisha, Mark and Yuko, now Connie as well as everybody else who got that correct well done.

  • And to find out the meaning of those other two track idioms, go to our website BBC leading english dot com.

  • Now, before we make tracks, Catherine, can you recap of the words and phrases we've heard today?

  • Most definitely So we had sweltering, sizzling and sculpturing, which are all extreme adjectives, which means very, very hot.

  • Then we had on course, on track and on pace, which refer to things which are happening the way we expect them to, based on what has happened until now.

  • Okay, and if you'd like to test yourself on these words and phrases, go to our website BBC learning english dot com.

  • Now I think it's time for us to leave the sweltering studio.

  • So you soon.

  • Goodbye, Goodbye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

he's a review from BBC Learning English.

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BBCニュースレビュー。世界の気温記録を更新するように設定されている (BBC News Review: World set to break global temperature record)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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