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  • Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

  • I'm your host, Will!

  • The last document that ever matters!

  • And of course let's not forget Leslie,

  • our all-knowing voice in the sky.

  • Hello everyone!

  • Tonight we're going to ask you three questions about

  • The past perfect.

  • That useful tense using 'had' and a past participle

  • for talking about the past that's past the past!

  • OK! Now, let's meet our contestants!

  • Hi, Will. My name's Mark!

  • And contestant number two?

  • Hello, everyone. I'm Levington!

  • Welcome back, Levington.

  • Win this one,

  • and you'll be on a par with our last champion,

  • Mya.

  • Really?!

  • Where is she now?

  • Oh, don't worry about her.

  • She's squirreled away somewhere.

  • Ok. Let's get going

  • and don't forget

  • you can play along at home too.

  • Our first round is a find the mistake round.

  • Can you correct the mistake

  • in each of these sentences?

  • I didn't eat by the time I had left home.

  • I hadn't eaten by the time I left home.

  • Correct!

  • When I had arrived home,

  • my sister already made lunch.

  • When I arrived home,

  • my sister had already made lunch.

  • Correct!

  • I had woken up late

  • because I forgot to set my alarm clock.

  • I woke up late because

  • I'd forgotten to set my alarm clock.

  • Correct!

  • Leslie?

  • Good job everyone!

  • The past perfect describes actions

  • that happened before the point in the past

  • that we are currently speaking about.

  • Once a time in the past has been set,

  • it allows us to go back for a moment

  • to a point before that.

  • Events in the past perfect

  • always take place before the past simple

  • or past continuous.

  • Well done! Have 23 points between you

  • to be divided according to the day of the week,

  • and the strength of your personality.

  • Let's have a bonus question.

  • Look at this sentence and tell me how the verb phrase

  • 'had had' should be pronounced.

  • I had had a shower.

  • Do it again.

  • I had had a shower.

  • Sorry…I didn't quite catch that.

  • Try closing one eye and pulling your lips back.

  • Had had?

  • One more time.

  • Maybe hold your arms above your head

  • Had had...had had?

  • One for luck!

  • Just lift your leg.

  • A little higher

  • higher still.

  • Had had!?!

  • Totally wrong I'm afraid.

  • And your attempt to distract us

  • with your weird body movements

  • only makes things more embarrassing for you.

  • What a shame.

  • Levington?

  • I had had a shower.

  • Well done!

  • Leslie?

  • When 'had' is pronounced as an auxiliary verb,

  • it takes its weak form!

  • If the main verb is also 'had',

  • we pronounce the first one weak

  • and the second one strong.

  • I had had a great time.

  • 15 points for Levington.

  • On to question two!

  • The past perfect is formed with 'had'

  • and a past participle verb,

  • but in which other grammatical structure

  • is the past perfect's form required?

  • It's got to be the past perfect continuous!

  • 'Had' plus 'been' plus verbING

  • A swing...

  • and a miss there Levington.

  • Mark, would you like to give it a try?

  • No idea.

  • Are you sure?

  • If Levington had known the answer,

  • he would have got the points!

  • Third conditional!

  • It's a third conditional.

  • Leslie?

  • Well done!

  • The third conditional is used to talk about the

  • possible consequences of past events

  • that didn't happen.

  • Its formula uses the past perfect

  • in the conditional clause.

  • If + had + past participle,

  • would + have + past participle.

  • Well done!

  • If Levington had given me the answer,

  • I would have given him twenty points.

  • But for you?

  • Three!

  • But

  • On to our last question.

  • The past perfect can also be used to talk about

  • unrealised hopes.

  • In this case, its pronunciation changes significantly.

  • How?

  • Isn't the auxiliary verb usually stressed

  • instead of unstressed?

  • Very good!

  • Can you give me an example?

  • I had intended to just do my best,

  • but now I want to beat Mya's record!

  • Good for you!

  • Mya was a lot more intelligent

  • than you are

  • but people love an underdog!

  • Leslie?

  • Well done!

  • The past perfect is often used to express

  • unrealised hopes.

  • Those are things we wanted,

  • but didn't happen.

  • Verbs like 'wish', 'hope', 'intend' and 'want'

  • are common in this structure.

  • We also usually stress the auxiliary verb.

  • Well done Levington.

  • Six points for you.

  • I had hoped that I would be able to sleep

  • the whole night through by now

  • but the dreams

  • Papa

  • Papa

  • Don't leave papa!

  • Well, that brings us to the end of today's

  • Grammar Gameshow.

  • Let's count out the points.

  • And the winner is

  • Mark!

  • With fifty-twelve points.

  • Well done! Here's what you've won!

  • It's an expired lightbulb!

  • Very illuminating!

  • We'll see you again next week,

  • where you can play for another prize.

  • And Levington.

  • So close, but so far.

  • Even though you didn't win, did you do well?

  • Well, I had hoped

  • Here come the crocodiles.

  • It looks like we'll need another contestant.

  • Thanks for joining us.

  • Say goodbye Leslie.

  • Auf Wiedersehen, Leslie.

  • See you next time.

Hello, and welcome to today's Grammar Gameshow!

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A2 初級

過去完了形。文法ゲームショウ 第13話 (The Past Perfect Tense: The Grammar Gameshow Episode 13)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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