Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • This is probably a video I should have made ages ago because you guys have been asking

  • for it for so so long. So today, we're going to look at five ways to sound more British.

  • Hey guys welcome, if you haven't met me before my name is Tom and I teach fresh modern British

  • English so you guys can take your English to the next level and achieve your life goals

  • whatever they are. Now today we're looking at five ways to sound more British. So I've

  • picked out five features of British English that differentiate it from American English.

  • Now of course there are many variations of British English, there are lots of different

  • accents. So I'm going to teach you with my accent which is a London accent, it's a southern

  • English accent but I will be referencing other accents in Britain. So I'm going to be contrasting

  • all these features of British English with American English examples so that you can

  • see the difference. Alright so if you are ready, let's get in to number one. Alright

  • our feature is the vowel sound /a/. In my accent I would say /a/ but in American English

  • they would say /a/. Now let's take the word banana, as you can hear I'm saying the second

  • vowel there /a/ banana. In American English that's banana. So they are using the /a/ sound

  • Now there is a split in British English as well. So in Britain a lot of the accents further

  • north in England and Scotland are going to have the /a/ sound whereas in the south, in

  • London and those kind of areas around London, it's going to be the /a/ sound. Ok, so I'm

  • going to choose a few words and I'm going to say it in a southern British English accent

  • and then I'm going to do it in an American accent to give you that contrast. So banana.

  • Bath. Laugh. Example. The Sahara. Don't get me wrong guys my American accent isn't perfect

  • alright! I know that it's not quite right. I'm giving you an approximation of what it

  • sounds like, ok? So yeah forgive me America for my slightly poor pronunciation. But yeah

  • if we take a word like 'bath' for example. In southern England yeah you are going to

  • hear bath but in northern England it'll be bath. So again you are getting that /a/ sound.

  • So there is a split in Britain as well as different countries so yeah so if you are

  • looking at British English you have to be aware of which accent you want to learn and

  • therefore which sound you are going to use in that vowel. Are you going to use the /a/

  • or the /a/? It's up to you, whichever one you want.

  • Now number two, we're still on the vowel sounds but we've swapped the vowel sounds round.

  • So in British English I'm saying /a/ and in American English I'm saying /a/. So let's

  • take the word pasta. In British English we're going to say pasta with the /a/ sound there.

  • But in American English that /a/ is actually an /a/ so it's pasta. Now we find this pattern

  • with all anglicised versions of foreign words or loan words. So pasta is obviously an Italian

  • word. It's been brought over to British English, we're going to say pasta but in American English

  • pasta. Take the famous painter Picasso. It's a foreign name, ok. Brought into British English

  • we're saying Picasso but in American English Picasso. So it's the /a/ sound there. Lasagna,

  • ok another Italian word. Lasagna in British English but in American English lasagna. Now

  • there is one sound that really defines what British English is about and that's the /t/.

  • Now let's take the name Harry Potter. Everybody knows Harry Potter, right? Now the /t/ there

  • Potter. I'm saying it with the clear /t/. We also have the glottal T in British English.

  • That's where we glide over the /t/ sound. It disappears. So instead of saying Harry

  • Potter, it's Harry Potter. Ok, so yeah it's called a glottal T. It's a feature in quite

  • a few accents in British English. So it's either Potter or Potter. In American English

  • they use the flap T which again glides over that sound. It sounds like a /d/. So instead

  • of saying Harry Potter, it's Harry Potter. Ok, I know that wasn't perfect America but

  • hey come on, I'm trying here. Now Potter, it's a glide, it's a soft glide over that

  • /t/ sound. So we have had three sounds there. Potter. Same applies to the word water. Water

  • pronouncing the t, with the glottal T it's water. And in American English water. Again

  • that flap T gliding over that sound. Daughter. With the glottal T daughter and with the American

  • English daughter. Butter. Hmmm are you starting to get it now? Are you starting to feel those

  • different sounds?

  • Aright! Next one.

  • Feature number four is the schwa sound. This is the most common sound in British English.

  • The eh sound. I've done a video all about the schwa , if you want to go check it out

  • I'll link it right up there. So we fin the schwa sound commonly when the word ends in

  • /r/ so for example better. The eh there, better. With that glottal T better but I'll use it

  • with the /t/ so better. Now in American English what they do is they really pronounce that

  • /r/ so it's not better, it's better and you've got that /r/ the /r/ sound at the end. So

  • in British English we say better, in American English better. Take the word bigger. In British

  • English bigger, in American English bigger. Alright so those are four really interesting

  • pronunciation features of British English. Now one that people often forget about is

  • word stress. Now word stress is a real feature of British English and contrasting it with

  • other types of English particularly with American English. So if we take the word Adult. In

  • British English we are stressing it on the first syllable Adult but in American English

  • they are shifting that stress to the second syllable, adult. So it's adult in British

  • English, adult in American English. There are a few examples of this. If you look at

  • the noun for address, like the residential address. In British English it's address,

  • so the second syllable is getting the stress but in American English address it's going

  • on the first syllable. There are lots of different examples. One that i want to look at particularly

  • is French words that have come into English. So take for example buffet. In British English

  • buffet, we are pronouncing it as we want buffet. The stress goes on the first syllable buffet.

  • But in American English they are keeping the same stress as the original French word so

  • it's buffet. Stress on the last syllable. The same with gourmet. Gourmet in British

  • English the stress is on the first syllable, in American English it's going on the last

  • syllable gourmet. Massage. So you can see the pattern here. So if you want

  • to sound more British in your pronunciation think about the word stress. Think about how

  • you are stressing each word, that will indicate what type of English you are speaking. Alright

  • that's five features of British English contrasted with American English. Now if you have enjoyed

  • that video please give it a big thumbs up and let me know if you would like another

  • video because there are so many other features of British English. I could talk about it

  • all day. So if you would like another one, let me know in the comments below. I could

  • do a part two, I'd be happy to so let me know. If you do want to dive a little bit deeper

  • into the different pronunciation of words and particularly word stress, then I have

  • done a video all about that. So check it, I'll just link it right above. If you have

  • enjoyed this video I'm sure you'll enjoy that one as well.

  • Eat Sleep Dreamers check it out, I've just got my very own Eat Sleep Dream t-shirt. How

  • cool is that? It was designed by a very good friend of mine and superb British artist called

  • Rob Lee. I'm super excited, it fits perfectly. I'm loving it, I'm absolutely loving it. I'll

  • put a link in the description below so you can go and check him out. His work is amazing.

  • Anyway he designed it for me and I got it printed. It's really comfy. So cool! Anyway

  • guys, thank you so much for hanging out with me. This is Tom, the Chief Dreamer, saying

  • goodbye.

This is probably a video I should have made ages ago because you guys have been asking

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

もっとブリティッシュ(アメリカ人ではない)に聞こえる5つの方法|発音 (5 Ways To Sound More BRITISH (Not American) | Pronunciation)

  • 6 0
    Summer に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語