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  • Do you know how to use phrasal verbs? Do you know important phrasal verbs are in English?

  • They are a fantastic way to make your English sound more informal and natural. But they

  • are not that easy to use so get ready for a lesson that's going to show you the secrets

  • about how we use them properly.

  • Welcome to Eat Sleep Dream English, if you haven't met me before I'm Tom and I teach

  • fresh modern British English so that you can take your English to the next level and achieve

  • your life goals.

  • Today we're looking at phrasal verbs. A phrasal verb is a verb, for example give or take plus

  • a particle, in, on, under things like that. Now when they go together they create a special

  • meaning that is separate from the individual verb itself. For example 'I'm going to take

  • off this jumper' Three, two, one. Alright, it worked! I took off my jumper. That means

  • to remove, so to take something off is to remove it. I'm going to put my jumper back

  • on, if that's ok. So take off means to remove. Now the only grammar that we are going to

  • need here is to change the verb depending on the tense. So for example I used the present

  • tense so to take off but in the past tense I would say took off. Or in the present perfect

  • I have taken off. So you are changing the verb depending on the tense that you want.

  • So why do we use phrasal verbs? Well, they are much more colloquial and informal than

  • single word verbs. And we use them all the time particularly in spoken English. So for

  • example take off, the single word would be to remove and now you have a choice. You can

  • use the more informal take off or the slightly more neutral or formal version to remove.

  • So I think it's really important to learn phrasal verbs and to give yourself the choice

  • to use an informal phrase or a neutral or formal phrase. If you have both you can adapt

  • to any situation you want. Especially important in business situations or in exams things

  • like that. You can choose now which type of English you want to use informal or formal.

  • Another example maybe you'll see a sign saying 'To extinguish fire, use this fire extinguisher.'

  • Now extinguish is the more formal word but maybe in every day spoken English I would

  • say to put out. So to put out a fire, use this fire extinguisher. So you have extinguish

  • and put out, one is formal one is informal, one is used in written English mostly the

  • other one is used in spoken. And that's a kind of pattern we see throughout phrasal

  • verbs. So if you are someone that wants to use spoken British English in informal situations

  • maybe to meet people or for television series or films, this is the kind of English that

  • you are going to want to learn.

  • So that's what they are and why we use them. Now let's look at how we use phrasal verbs.

  • Just before that guys, remember to subscribe to my channel so that you don't miss a single

  • English video. Also if you know anyone that is learning English, I'd love it if you share

  • this video with them.

  • Ok, now there are a few patterns we need to know to use phrasal verbs correctly. So let's

  • have a look at them now. Some phrasal verbs don't take a direct object and these are called

  • intransitive verbs. For example 'I get up at 7 a.m.' There is no object in that sentence.

  • So that's the first set of phrasal verbs, intransitive verbs with no object. Now a lot

  • of phrasal verbs do have objects and these are called transitive verbs. Now there are

  • different patterns for transitive verbs that we will look at right now. The first pattern

  • is when the object goes after the verb and the particle. For example 'My girlfriend cheated

  • on me'. So to cheat on someone is to have a romantic or sexual relationship with someone

  • else other than your partner. To cheat on someone. So my girlfriend is the noun, cheated

  • on is the phrasal verb and me is the object. And that's coming after the verb and the particle.

  • Here are some other examples of that same pattern.

  • Another pattern is for some transitive verbs to have the object separate the verb and the

  • particle. For example 'Turn on the TV'. So turn on is the phrasal verb, the TV is the

  • object. Now we can put the object, the TV, in between the verb and the particle. So 'Turn

  • the TV on'. The meaning is exactly the same, no change. But we can decide whether we want

  • to put the object after the verb and particle or in between. It's up to us, it's our choice.

  • Here are a few more examples of that same pattern.

  • Now a really important thing to remember when using this pattern is that if the object is

  • a personal pronoun, for example you, me, it then it must go in between the verb and the

  • particle. For example the phrasal verb give back. It means to return. I would have to

  • say 'Give me back my phone'. Me is the personal pronoun and it's going in between the verb

  • and the particle. I cannot say 'Give back me my phone' ok? I can't put the personal

  • pronoun after the particle. It has to go in between, Ok? So that's a really important

  • thing to remember, the personal pronoun goes in between the verb and the particle.

  • Ok, so those are the essential patterns of phrasal verbs. Now I think one of the trickiest

  • things for most students when learning phrasal verbs is that the same phrasal verb can have

  • different meanings. If we go back to what we were looking at earlier, take off. Take

  • off means to remove, ok? So I took off my jumper, in a different situation it means

  • that an airplane leaves the ground, it goes into the air, into the sky. So the airplane

  • takes off. It goes along the runway and goes up into the sky. So that's another meaning,

  • same phrasal verb, take off but a different meaning. Another meaning would be to become

  • successful. So 'Her acting career took off' and that means her acting career became successful.

  • So now we have three different meanings of the same phrasal verb and there are other

  • ones. Now what we have to do as learners is to learn them of course, the different situations.

  • And then to think about the context, ok? Because that will tell us which meaning we are talking

  • about. If we are talking about an airplane it's likely that it'll be take off as in leave

  • the ground. If I'm talking about an item of clothing, probably it's to remove. But you

  • have to check the situation, ok? Context is really important here. But yes, don't see

  • this as a problem, see this as an easy way to learn more vocabulary. I have one phrase,

  • take off, but there are different meanings and now I have three meanings for the same

  • word. So it's kind of good, it's kind of useful. You can build your vocabulary quicker by learning

  • the different meanings.

  • Now guys, I don't know if you can tell, but I love phrasal verbs and I think they are

  • so so useful for you guys to learn. So what I'm going to do is do another video teaching

  • you the top ten essential phrasal verbs to learn. So these are going to be phrasal verbs

  • that you can use in your every day conversation that I think are just essential, that you

  • have to know them. And hopefully once you learn those, you'll then be able to learn

  • so many more. Now I hope you've found this video useful. If you did, please give it a

  • massive thumbs up. Of course subscribe and remember I release new videos every Tuesday

  • and every Friday. So yep, thank you so much for joining me, this is Tom, the Chief Dreamer,

  • saying goodbye.

Do you know how to use phrasal verbs? Do you know important phrasal verbs are in English?

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句動詞の使い方|秘密が明らかに! (How To Use Phrasal Verbs | Secrets Revealed!!!)

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    Summer に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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