Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Hey, it's Marie Forleo and you are watching MarieTV and/or listening to the Marie Forleo

  • Podcast.

  • So if you've ever had a great idea for a product or a service and you told it to people and

  • nobody got it, or if you ever felt like you were too young, too old, too fat, too something

  • to really make it in your industry, you are going to love today's interview.

  • I have the one and only Katie Sturino on, she is the founder of Megababe, which is an

  • incredible company that creates nontoxic products for things like thigh chafe and boob sweat

  • and butt pimples.

  • I really think you're going to enjoy this episode, so let's get into it.

  • Katie!

  • Oh my goodness.

  • Hi.

  • Thank you so much.

  • I've been wanting to have you on the show for so long as you know, because we talk about

  • it.

  • Same.

  • I know.

  • It's like now we're doing this and we're in different parts of the country.

  • We have so much to talk about today, but I want to dive in with your badass company,

  • Megababe.

  • Where did the idea for a Megababe come from?

  • Tell us the backstory.

  • I have had thigh chafe my entire life and I always thought I was kind of alone in it

  • because I didn't see anyone talking or hear anyone talking about it.

  • I didn't hear of any solutions that really made sense to me or appealed to me.

  • And then when I started my blog right around April, I would start to talk about chafe season.

  • I'm like, it's chafe season girls.

  • What are you going to do?

  • Are you doing short shorts?

  • Are you doing those lace band things?

  • What's your program?

  • Because I would try everything.

  • And then at the end of that summer I was like, why the F am I hyping other people's products

  • that I don't even care about and why is there nothing out there in the world that is really

  • just for a cute girl who's looking to walk to work without getting a thigh burn?

  • Yeah.

  • And how many years ago was that?

  • It will be three in June.

  • Wow.

  • So not that long ago.

  • No.

  • And when I was doing some background research, which we do for every interview, I read somewhere

  • that you shared, the only products on the market were like for guys and sweaty balls,

  • essentially.

  • Deez nuts for her.

  • Sure.

  • Yeah.

  • Yeah, it's true.

  • It feels like anything that was made for sweat or chafe is kind of awful marketing and you

  • don't really want to talk about it.

  • Right.

  • And so when you had the idea for the company, you've never run a company that's a product-based

  • company before, right?

  • So was there any part of your mindset or just the conversation even internally that was

  • like, can I do this?

  • I don't know how to do this.

  • How do I get started?

  • Walk us through what you were thinking.

  • I still feel that way.

  • I'm always looking to people who have done this before and I'm looking to them for the

  • answer.

  • Then I find time and time again, they don't have the answer.

  • So that's a thing that you just keep having to learn no matter...

  • As the stakes get higher, you're just like expecting someone to come in and tell you

  • how to do it.

  • Yeah, I was very concerned that I was starting up a... everyone kept calling it niche.

  • My least favorite term, niche.

  • They were like, it seems like I'm a niche product.

  • I don't think you're going to sell much of it.

  • I don't know how many people have that problem.

  • I've never heard of that problem.

  • These are the common things I heard when I was launching and I really had no idea if

  • they were right.

  • I mean, I thought just like scientifically, mathematically that they were wrong.

  • Yeah.

  • Because I didn't think I had a very unique problem.

  • But yeah, I really had no idea if this was going to be a thing or if it would just die

  • on the vine and we'd have 10,000 units of thigh rescue in my parent's garage, so...

  • So even creating more context, before you started this company, so you had your blog

  • and what was your main career or source of income at that point?

  • What were you doing for a living?

  • What I still do right now, which is I'm a style influencer.

  • So I work with brand partners and that's how I make my income currently.

  • I have a collection with StitchFix that's launching.

  • We're launching our third collection on June 2nd, so that's going to be really exciting

  • and yeah, brand partnerships are how I make my income.

  • I still don't take a salary from Megababe.

  • No one does because we're self-funded and we just... all of us are lucky enough to have

  • a secondary income, but it also means that our time is split.

  • Yes.

  • Yeah.

  • I want to talk about, first of all, I think the branding for Megababe is so genius, I

  • loved it from the moment I saw it.

  • I mean, I loved you from the moment that we met.

  • I love you.

  • I was like, we're meant to be friends.

  • But I want to talk about the writing and the positioning aspect of Megababe products.

  • You have products called Rosy Pits and Bust Dust and Le Tush Butt Mask and Thigh Rescue.

  • What's your process, if you have one, for naming things?

  • Do you do the copywriting or someone on your team?

  • Is it collective?

  • My best friend Kate is my...

  • So it's my sister and my best friend Kate, and we are the founders of Megababe, and neither

  • of them have thigh chafe, by the way.

  • It was just like, I was like, "Guys, I'm going to make a stick," and they were like, "Okay,

  • we're with you."

  • But it's basically Kate and I'll get on the phone and we start to spitball ideas and right

  • now we're naming a product for the fall and we're kind of stuck on it.

  • So that's what we do.

  • We go back and forth and then we have a small group of people, just friends that we'll send

  • names to and we're like A or B and they'll let us know.

  • I mean, that's how it is.

  • Yeah.

  • No, I think naming is so fun and I think that, for me, because I'm into copywriting, I love

  • teaching people about writing and also just the power of using the right words to describe

  • something.

  • You can have a product that's amazing and if it's positioned in one way it feels kind

  • of boring.

  • Yes.

  • And then you do something else and all of a sudden people are like, "That's fun and

  • it's effective and I want that.

  • How do I go get that?"

  • So I think you guys do a brilliant job of that.

  • Thanks a lot.

  • You're welcome.

  • So, okay, three years in, Megababe.

  • I know you also just launched this not too long ago.

  • Hand sanitizer.

  • For those listening on the podcast, I'm holding up one of Katie's newest products, which she,

  • thank you by the way, you were so kind to send me.

  • Josh and I went on a bike ride yesterday.

  • We had to get something from the hardware store and he's like, "I'm taking this Megababe

  • hand sanitizer."

  • I'm like, "Yes you are."

  • Yes, you are.

  • Yeah.

  • When did the idea for this new product come?

  • My sister had a baby about a year ago and she's like a psychotic new mom.

  • Look, I'm holding my microphone like I want my microphone to be on a stand like your microphone.

  • It just keeps inching up like this.

  • You're adorable.

  • It's almost like a little ice cream cone, too.

  • You're like, "Oh, hi."

  • No, I'm like, okay, I'll just keep it here.

  • My sister had a baby about a year ago and she was using Purell and her hands were just

  • cracked, and I was like, "This is awful.

  • Have you looked at yourself recently?"

  • We need to make something better.

  • And then we found through the research when we started developing it that most inexpensive

  • hand sanitizer is full of fillers and chemicals and all the things.

  • So I was like, we can do better.

  • We can have a better hand sanitizer experience.

  • I'm a big hand sanitizer fan.

  • I always carry a little bottle in my bag.

  • And so we went with plant-based alcohol.

  • We took out all the fillers and we put in oil that made sure that your hands won't crack.

  • And isn't that interesting how far back...

  • We launched in January.

  • Yeah.

  • Oh my goodness.

  • And we launched in January and then all hell broke loose.

  • Yeah.

  • And has it been selling out?

  • Have you been able to keep it in stock?

  • Yes, not easily.

  • My sister basically is like a bulldog and she is taking on everyone from big hand sanitizer

  • companies that need components to every small brand who's trying to capitalize on what's

  • going on by launching a hand sanitizer now.

  • So we have been fighting for raw ingredients.

  • Fighting for bottles, caps, pumps, everything.

  • And we have been able to stay in stock.

  • We were out of stock for two weeks.