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  • - Hey everyone, this is Jeremy Schieffelin

  • with Khan Academy.

  • Thanks so much for joining us this afternoon.

  • You're in for a very special treat today

  • because we have kind of Academy ambassador

  • and all star male teacher, Shalom with us today

  • who has been using Khan Academy for almost a decade.

  • Basically since Sal Khan himself started making the videos,

  • Shalom has been with us using it in his classroom.

  • So if you're ever curious about how do you get started

  • with Khan Academy for remote learning,

  • how do you specialize and target your content

  • for your middle school students?

  • Shalom is the person to speak to

  • and he's happy to share his expertise today.

  • So that being said,

  • before we get you Shalom's background here,

  • I wanna remind you the first part of the session

  • we focused on the most common questions we received

  • and Shalom will talk through how to get started

  • and how to focus your energies with Khan Academy.

  • And then we'll open it up for the final half

  • for questions from the audience.

  • So if you ever wanna ask a question,

  • just go to the question section

  • of the go to webinar control panel

  • and we'll take those in the order they're received.

  • So Shalom, welcome and thank you so much

  • for joining us today.

  • - It's very nice to be here with everybody.

  • - And just to sort of give folks a sense of

  • where you're coming from, tell us a little bit about

  • where you teach, who you teach and what your experience

  • with Khan has been.

  • - Okay, I'm a seventh grade math teacher

  • in Ocean Township, New Jersey.

  • Teaching is a second career for me,

  • I actually worked on Wall Street for six years,

  • and decided to make the switch

  • and I've been teaching middle school ever since.

  • So here I am in Monmouth County, New Jersey. (laughs)

  • - Very cool.

  • And so tell us, like, even before this crisis started,

  • why have you been a Khan user in your classroom?

  • - At about the 2010/2011 school year,

  • a friend of mine had told me about it.

  • And I had heard about this Khan Academy videos thing,

  • but she told me, "Oh, no, no, it has exercises."

  • So I was really drawn to the exercises.

  • Back then they had to get either seven in a row

  • or 10 in a row right to level up.

  • And I was like, this is how we learn everything.

  • So primarily I didn't have computers back then.

  • I used it initially for extra credit.

  • But I continue to use it to this day.

  • It's my primary source of practice problems for students.

  • I use others, but it's my primary source.

  • And I love the fact that students can go at their own pace.

  • They're not, it really allows them to learn

  • what they want at their level.

  • And it provides such good data for me as a teacher

  • to decide when to intervene, what to intervene,

  • what trends there are, things like that.

  • - Very cool.

  • And so obviously you could probably give

  • an entire three hour lecture on how to set up Khan Academy

  • during normal times.

  • - I really could. (laughs)

  • - (laughs) The times we live in are very abnormal

  • all of a sudden.

  • If you are an educator out there, a middle school teacher

  • who is struggling to get with remote learning

  • basically yesterday and the district is saying, "Hey, you've

  • "got to roll something out for your students."

  • Obviously number one, our hearts go out to you.

  • But number two, what kind of like really concrete tips

  • would you give to that educator

  • who wants to get started immediately?

  • - Okay, first of all, I'm very fortunate,

  • my students are conditioned on how to use Khan Academy.

  • And I know it's scary to, "Oh my God,

  • "how am I gonna start with something new?"

  • So my recommendation is to go through some exercises

  • as a student (mumbles)

  • answer them yourself,

  • but make sure they are review exercises.

  • Start with something that the kids would know.

  • Start small, assign a few skills for them

  • and then just at that point, dive in,

  • meaning you assign it to them.

  • You tell them, "Here, go do this by Friday,"

  • and let them work and then take a look at the data

  • that comes in, take a look at what students

  • are working on.

  • Are they getting them correct or are they not?

  • So you wanna start small

  • because you don't wanna overwhelm the kids

  • with a bunch of stuff, which is why I think

  • for right now it would be good to start with review.

  • But then once you get started,

  • make sure to look at all the reports,

  • try to understand it's, I know it's so hard

  • to see the forest through the trees.

  • But that would be my big piece of advice.

  • And here's where I'm gonna give you a shout out, Jeremy.

  • A few weeks ago you did a workshop

  • and you talked about adding.

  • It was, once you add yourself as a coach

  • to your own account.

  • And I think that was actually something

  • I had never thought to do

  • considering the amount of time I've spent using Khan.

  • And by doing that I started seeing the same notifications

  • that the students would see.

  • You know, here's something your teacher assigned you.

  • I started getting email notifications.

  • So you kind of by adding yourself as a coach

  • to your own learner side of the account,

  • 'cause every account can be a learner and a coach account,

  • it really kind of helped me understand,

  • I already kind of knew what they saw

  • but it really let me, it kind of put it in my face

  • to see what the students are seeing

  • when I assign them things.

  • - Very cool.

  • So just to recap those three main steps,

  • it sounds like number one,

  • just start searching around Khan Academy,

  • playing the role of a student.

  • What does it feel like to look at a video?

  • What does it feel like to do an exercise?

  • Get some hints.

  • Once you see one that you're really excited about,

  • maybe just start by assigning a single assignment at a time

  • just to sort of dip your toes in the water

  • and get your students feeling comfortable

  • and then to really understand what it looks like

  • from the student lens, come down to your student section,

  • get your class code, and then under your learner home,

  • you can find the section called teachers at the very bottom

  • and add yourself to your own classroom.

  • You'll now see those notifications that Shalom talked about.

  • So you understand exactly what it feels like

  • to be in your students' shoes.

  • - Yeah, and the other thing too is in this time

  • that we're in the videos tend to take a little longer.

  • I would just start at first with the exercises.

  • Yeah, this is just practical advice

  • so that you can quickly see, "Oh, is this something

  • "I'd want my students doing?"

  • And if it is right at the top of the screen,

  • if you pick an exercise right now,

  • can you just pick one and show everybody

  • how they can assign it to their students

  • right from the top of the screen?

  • - Yeah, tell me like a common skill you might be teaching

  • in your classroom right now, Shalom

  • if we were back in school.

  • - Well this time of year, I'm doing some geometry

  • with my advanced class.

  • So if you go to seventh grade geometry.

  • So let's just go to Area of a Circle, second one there.

  • - So click the practice button.

  • - So you're in the student view.

  • The student have to answer seven questions

  • and you say, "Wait a minute,

  • "I really like this question up here."

  • So at the top there's assigned to, all right,

  • you can assign it to multiple classes,

  • you can assign it to individual students

  • as long as it's for one class only.

  • If you have multiple classes, you're just gonna assign it

  • to every student in the class.

  • I prefer to do different questions

  • or you can also assign the same questions to everybody

  • different questions the way I go.

  • And then you can set a due date.

  • Now this will come up on their learner dashboard.

  • But this right here will not come up on Google classroom.

  • That's something teachers, I know you can link your class

  • to Google classrooms to get your roster into Khan Academy,

  • but assignments don't automatically go out

  • to Google classroom.

  • And I'm hoping that they are working on changing that

  • in the future.

  • - Yeah, I'll just mention on that point,

  • if you ever have feedback for us about something

  • you'd love to see in the product,

  • just go right up to your name

  • in the upper right hand corner,

  • click the help button and then come to the section called

  • report a problem and say, "Hey, I've got

  • "a really great feature idea

  • "that would make things much, much better."

  • I'll actually paste this in to the chat section

  • so you can let us know if you have problems

  • or ideas you want us to consider.

  • Okay, so that is sort of getting started

  • with checking it out.

  • What are some of the challenges that you anticipate

  • the teachers will face in the next few weeks, Shalom?

  • I know we have a lot of things on our shoulders right now,

  • but if you think about Khan Academy in particular,

  • where do you see new teachers you run into issues

  • and how can they sort of preempt those best they can?

  • - Okay.

  • My biggest challenge with Khan Academy

  • has always been getting students

  • to buy into the growth mindset aspect of it.

  • You know, it's not just, "Here's five problems,

  • "do them, great, you got four wrong,

  • "let's move on to the next topic."

  • It's really designed to have the kids work

  • until they show levels of proficiency.

  • So two things that I make all my students and parents do

  • at the beginning of the year

  • is I make them watch the, "You Can Learn Anything Video".

  • And also there's about a five, six minute or so Ted talk

  • by Angela Lee Duckworth on grit.

  • So it's kind of to get them set.

  • And by the way, she talks about how

  • she was a seventh grade teacher and how perseverance

  • and all these things to get students in the mindset

  • of you're not gonna get everything right.

  • You're gonna make mistakes along the way

  • and that it's okay as long as you keep going.

  • Those are the two things I think that

  • are the biggest challenges that I've had.

  • And I've had some tough times,

  • especially in my earlier years

  • with parents complaining about

  • how frustrated their child is.

  • But since I've started doing that,

  • I've gotten much better appreciation from the parents

  • and from the students that struggling is okay.

  • I always say, "Why is it okay to be terrible

  • "when you first play an instrument?"

  • I mean, you don't see somebody pick up the flute

  • and they're playing it and they sound great.

  • They sound awful, right?

  • And why is it not acceptable in math to be bad

  • at something at first?

  • So that's my first thing.

  • Also another challenge is the amount of content

  • can be overwhelming.

  • It really, really can.

  • But thankfully if you click on courses there for me, Jeremy?

  • Right.

  • - You got it.

  • - You will see the courses are aligned

  • with the common core standards, which by grade.

  • So if you go down, I'm looking at your screen right now,

  • first grade, second grade, third grade, fourth grade.

  • So you can go