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  • So, these are scary times

  • but unfortunately there's more to worry about

  • than just a global pandemic.

  • New warning from the FBI about coronavirus scams.

  • Scams related to the coronavirus.

  • Stealing sensitive personal information.

  • It could infect your computer.

  • Any time there's a global event,

  • hackers like to weaponize it.

  • So whether it's the Olympics or an election

  • or a global pandemic,

  • hackers are trying to leverage whatever the situation is

  • against users.

  • I have an old email address

  • with a pretty good spam filter

  • and it's just inundated with spam mail

  • claiming to be everything from the World Health Organization

  • to COVID-19 vaccines.

  • Now I'm not gonna take the bait

  • but believe it or not,

  • a lot of people will.

  • It is working that is why

  • hackers and criminal attackers continue to use it.

  • Now I don't need to tell you.

  • Well, maybe I should.

  • Don't click a link, don't open attachments.

  • Just delete it.

  • But for many, that's easier said than done.

  • Phishing emails have quadrupled

  • since the coronavirus outbreak.

  • It's gotten so bad that both the U.S. and the U.K.

  • Have issued joint warnings about the schemes.

  • So why have all these phishing schemes

  • pivoted to coronavirus practically overnight?

  • So a successful phishing campaign,

  • it has to be interesting

  • and it has to sort of look reliable.

  • On one hand, they want this email to look like

  • something you're gonna get anyway

  • but they also want it to grab people's attention

  • to say Oh I need to click on this urgently

  • and the coronavirus stuff really fits both of those things.

  • People are getting an incredible amount of email about it

  • but it's also a place where people have a lot of hunger

  • for new information.

  • But there's one ingredient that COVID-19 pandemic

  • offers hackers that say a Nigerian prince never could.

  • Fear.

  • It is scary.

  • Millions who are scared right now.

  • I am just afraid of this week.

  • The idea behind these schemes is that in times of crisis

  • or uncertainty or fear,

  • people just let their guards down.

  • So in cases where you know something is promised,

  • maybe people are distracted and not as focused on

  • who might be sending something.

  • Or in cases where a hacker is promising information,

  • when we're scared, we might be more likely to click on it

  • without thinking twice about who it might be coming from.

  • On top of the fear-based COVID-19 schemes,

  • hackers have seized on one of their tried and true lures,

  • money.

  • The prospect of a payout from the two trillion dollars

  • stimulus package in the U.S.

  • comes with the subject line saying

  • COVID-19 payment.

  • Again, delete it.

  • So it's important to understand who these hackers are

  • and despite all the stock footage ever made about hackers,

  • they're not necessarily some shady dude in a hoodie.

  • These are folks that aren't out

  • to sort of make a quick buck.

  • Some of these groups can make

  • hundreds of millions of dollars in a year

  • and sort of have the investments

  • to sort of use that money to reinvest

  • in sort of grow big capabilities.

  • Cybersecurity data suggests

  • that many of these hacking operations

  • are backed by major nation states.

  • So we've seen multiple state-sponsored

  • cyber espionage actors who use coronavirus as a lure.

  • We've seen North Korea, China and Russia

  • all employ it to try to compromise their victims.

  • And it doesn't stop at spam mail.

  • Fake social media accounts are spreading disinformation

  • about the coronavirus that back the interest

  • of countries like China and Russia.

  • According to the U.S. State Department,

  • Russia has put forth its entire disinformation apparatus

  • to spread disinformation about the coronavirus pandemic.

  • So this includes websites, conventional media

  • and also they stay swarms of bots on social media platforms

  • that are doing the work of amplifying

  • or spreading messages that are false related to the pandemic

  • Russia's motivation is to sow discord and distrust

  • and are leveraging the pandemic to create

  • a lot of fear and uncertainty

  • and make people doubt healthcare institutions.

  • Just because the 2016 election came to an end

  • doesn't mean that disinformation campaigns

  • from nation state actors and criminal actors

  • didn't come to an end.

  • So we are seeing bot nets from Russia, from Iran,

  • from China,

  • perfectly willing and capable

  • of creating chaos through misinformation.

  • And unfortunately, it kind of gets worse

  • because hospitals and medical institutions

  • are a favorite target for hackers.

  • What they will do is hit a target with ransomware

  • which is an attack that uses malware

  • to encrypt or lock down data belonging to an organization.

  • And they'll charge a ransom for the decryption of that data.

  • And from a criminal perspective,

  • those attacks might be more successful

  • during a time when healthcare institutions are so important.

  • There is increased targeting on medical facilities,

  • hospitals, testing centers, primary care physicians

  • because they are so dire, so desperate

  • to keep their operations up.

  • If they shut down, there are lives at stake.

  • Just as we must band together

  • to defeat the COVID-19 pandemic,

  • we must also be vigilant against the people and nations

  • shamelessly trying to capitalize on these trying times.

  • In terms of disinformation campaigns,

  • it's important to think about

  • who you're receiving information from,

  • trusting official sources and not believing

  • everything that's on social media about the pandemic.

  • Instead, going to trusted news outlets.

  • Always be on the lookout to communication

  • that you don't normally get.

  • Sort of the ways to check that you can double check

  • who the sender is from,

  • making sure they're exactly sort of who you're expecting.

  • Just opening and looking at an email

  • in your Gmail browser is

  • it's gonna be very unlikely to infect you.

  • But your risk increases a lot when you open an attachment

  • or click on a link.

  • So you can generally read an email and be okay

  • but be very wary of attachments or links

  • especially if they're unexpected.

  • So while we all understand the temptation to click,

  • out of fear or even greed,

  • please do yourself a favor and just delete it.

So, these are scary times

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B1 中級 新型コロナウイルス 新型肺炎 COVID-19

ハッカーはコロナウイルスを利用している (Hackers Are Capitalizing on the Coronavirus)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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