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  • we're gonna show you four different kids answering a question, and you have to decide whether they're lying or telling the truth.

  • Each kid is told that if they get seven out of 10 balls in the basket, they will be given $5.

  • But just before they start, the experimenter finds an excuse to leave the room and ask them to stand behind the line and throw the balls into the basket one at a time.

  • So these kids are now alone in the room, so the incentive to cheat is pretty high.

  • But little do they know.

  • The scientists have placed a hidden camera in the room.

  • The question the experimenter asked when they got back was Did you cheat?

  • And here were their answers, you know?

  • Okay, I tried the ball once.

  • Could you tell which ones were telling the truth and which were lying again?

  • Okay, I get the ball.

  • It turns out that kid's one into were telling the truth, and kids three and four were lying.

  • But in fact, 80% of kids over the age of four will lie in this scenario.

  • When guessing who was lying, the answer was either yes or no.

  • So you had a 50% chance of getting it right?

  • So even if you did guess correctly you're actually not necessarily that good at detecting lives.

  • And turns out no one really is.

  • Dr.

  • King Lee is a lying researcher now.

  • He is not a researcher to live.

  • Okay?

  • He is a researcher to studies lying.

  • My name is Conley.

  • I'm a professor at the University of Toronto.

  • Once a week did their studies with many, many Children.

  • While they tell lies, they look right in the eyes so they don't blink.

  • So that that common sense view is totally out of the out of the way right away.

  • Studies show that across multiple professions like judges, social workers or police officers, people he would expect are good at detecting lies.

  • Turns out they aren't.

  • Okay, so we're here at Conley's developmental lab, and I'm with Sarah, Who's gonna help us with one of the technologies that can detect emotions and lying.

  • So what we're gonna do, we're going to use facet, which is behind me.

  • We had already recorded you making some interesting facial expression.

  • It's different.

  • I tried to make different emotions.

  • Okay, So what are we looking at?

  • We have my face and a bunch of bars.

  • Graphs.

  • What do they mean?

  • So each of these different colors is a different emotion.

  • So right now we're looking at joy.

  • There's anger, surprise, fear and contempt.

  • Look right about here.

  • It looks like you're about to experience a little bit of disgust.

  • That's very clear.

  • We discussed.

  • I believe I was asked about eating toenails.

  • How do you do this with kids and in like, Mawr Experimental environment?

  • Yeah, so this there's kind of two options you can use this technology with one is you get a person to sit down and watch and record them with the webcam.

  • You could put some stimuli on screen, see how they react to it, but that really doesn't help us out with lying.

  • Instead, we want to see how to kids or even adults lie in the real world.

  • So we put them into real situations where they're lying to us or telling the truth, and we secretly record their faces and later on you can take that video, get in there So but what happens if someone lives with a neutral face?

  • I mean, it's not that hard like Watch this.

  • I, in fact, did not steal the pox of Michael Stern, the coolest kid in my class in Grade seven.

  • Even parents cannot assess accurately when their own kids were lying.

  • But thankfully, scientists here to help us out.

  • We recently give up a new technology called Chester More optical imaging technology.

  • So the idea basically is a used literally his pure for the skin like this.

  • There you see the blood underneath your skin, and then you link up with the frames of the videos, and then you can see the blood flow changes in different parts of the face.

  • And by doing so, then you combine them all together on using machine learning again.

  • And you can detect the passions in which the child is line versus the patterns in which the child is telling the truth.

  • One of the major features is actually when you lie, the facial blood flow on the chick goes down, but the blood flow in the nose goes up.

  • So one of the studies were wrong, and we showed that about 85% after soup can tell child line, so blood flow to the face can help us detect if someone is lying and hilariously blood actually flows to your nose.

  • Hash tag.

  • Pinocchio Lying obviously requires your brain.

  • So how do we study what's going on in the brain when someone's lying?

  • So what exactly is this even called Mrs R F Nears machine, which is functional near infrared spectroscopy?

  • Who?

  • Okay, here's is much easier like mirrors.

  • Auto tune Look out, Lady Gaga, Bjork.

  • The newest hat is here, so these the red ones is admitting the light.

  • And then the blue one is trying to measure how much light can receive.

  • And depending on how much light is lost between these two ports, we can kind of determine how much oxygen is in the blood and where the brain is most active.

  • But turns out there are differences in the brain.

  • So when Children are lying, we discovered that in the prefrontal cortex, it's more activity when you're lying and telling the truth.

  • When you're lying, it takes more new resources to do controls and Italian.

  • The truth requires very limited neural controls, and we discovered that before it's kind of well organized, synchronized and after you have told a lie, then the brain just goes haywire.

  • So So telling a lie is really not very good for your brain.

  • We can definitely relate to that whenever I lie.

  • I always panic so much, and I realize I can't hold the conversation anymore because my brain has gone like, completely haywire.

  • But I barely ever like No, it's all the time, every day, all day.

  • It's amazing to think, though, that Dr Lee's lab has been ableto look at brains in real time as they lie and see the chaos that ensues.

  • When you're trying to tell you it's pretty fascinating to think about the ways in which this technology could be used.

  • I mean, imagine in the next presidential election being able to see in real time of someone is lying or telling the truth.

  • I mean, it's pretty powerful thing, but it's gotta be perfected first so that it's not used or abused in the wrong way.

  • Thank you so much for watching really appreciate it.

  • Make sure you subscribe to a sap science and let us know if there's any other labs or things happening that you want us to go on the scene to check out.

  • We live in Toronto.

we're gonna show you four different kids answering a question, and you have to decide whether they're lying or telling the truth.

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A2 初級

ライアーを見破ることができますか? (Can You Spot The Liar?)

  • 13 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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