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  • it is a pleasure to be here.

  • Thank you for the invitation.

  • I'll start with what I thought was appropriate for breaking barriers when I was asked to speak about breaking barriers.

  • The first thing that comes to my mind is this iconic shot.

  • Neil Armstrong on the moon on the Apollo mission, stepping off the lunar module, saying First man on the moon, saying one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.

  • And then it turns to Roger Bannister.

  • He broke the barrier off the four minute mile, and only in October I was watching television on on there in Vienna with this man running on dhe.

  • Eddie Keep Shorty is the Kenyan long distance runner, 26.2 miles.

  • The marathon distance on dhe did that under two hours.

  • Broken the barrier on it got me thinking, You know, these great feats these people achieve, they set new standards.

  • They're set new benchmarks.

  • They prove the fact that certain things can be done.

  • And this is great achievements, something that we could be proud of, something we cannot use in our everyday life to ask to inspire us on DDE.

  • There's nothing that I think off that we can't do know.

  • Through my life experiences, these people achieved it.

  • They've set the benchmarks of setting standards.

  • They've done the proving.

  • But these events they take place may witness some every 10 years.

  • Once in a lifetime.

  • Maybe, But what about the everyday?

  • What about me?

  • You know, after all, I don't have the mandate from the president of the United States to build a team to go to the moon.

  • I think my wife would like me to go there.

  • But you know, you don't have the super athleticism off a sprinter or a long distance runner.

  • And that must be many, many of our problems out there.

  • Many barriers and not everything after a moon shot.

  • No.

  • Everything has to be a world record that everyday things on it got me thinking, You know?

  • What about me?

  • What can I learn from this?

  • What is it that takes toe do something exceptional?

  • Something more than the everyday.

  • Like getting out of bed, going to the work, going back, doing the routine things every day.

  • What is it that makes people drive them on DDE?

  • There must be some commonalities.

  • What can I learn from them.

  • What are the requirements to actually achieve to do something extraordinary?

  • Something different.

  • And sometimes it's a necessity.

  • A necessity makes you do things that you wouldn't normally do on DDE.

  • I started looking at the other in common points here.

  • What is it that a ll these people Great organizations driven by great people.

  • They achieved every single day every single week.

  • And what is it that they do?

  • What?

  • The commonalities on DDE we look at breaking barriers.

  • There's certain things are looking the common denominators that makes this happen.

  • And the first thing ah found is that you need vision.

  • You need to clearly define what you want.

  • You need a vision and you need that vision so clear in your mind.

  • It's so focused that the only thing you can see is that the only thing that the politician sore was going to move.

  • The only thing that l'equippe jokey saw was breaking the two hour mark.

  • The anything Roger Bannister saw was breaking the four mile barrier.

  • The four minute barrier that vision was still So the next thing that needed was the belief cannot do this.

  • The people behind it there needed We convinced they can only do that if they themselves convinced they need that deep belief, it had to flow through the blood that flows through the veins that needed breathe it.

  • They need to live it.

  • I'm doing that.

  • That belief translates through other people who come along on their also support.

  • You believe in your vision on that belief.

  • Then this week turned a dedication.

  • You need to be totally dedicated in what you do.

  • You need every single waking minute sleeping.

  • You need to live a lot.

  • You need to act to strain every sinew in your body, every pumping beat in your heart.

  • You need a dedication.

  • It could be annoying.

  • Never you construct your way for me, know what happens.

  • You're going to do it.

  • You're going to achieve that.

  • The next thing is that the people around you, I need to believe that you need people to support you.

  • You need people with you.

  • Without that, you know where where is your family?

  • Where's your work colleagues or whether it's your bank there supporting you?

  • It's any kind of institution, the wider community.

  • It has to be accepted, and you need to be able to collaborate with people on those people who would not normally collaborate with you.

  • No being your industry.

  • They may come along with the different idea.

  • They may come along with something else if we look at all this team collaboration people doing it.

  • 400,000 people working on the Apollo burger, 20,000 different companies, thousands of universities.

  • It was a total collaboration.

  • No one single person could do it, no matter how good you are.

  • So you need people.

  • You need teams that teams of people behind keep choking the people who research the ideal temperature for interim in the place.

  • The time difference from Kenya to Vienna.

  • The timing that they're all the people that was 14 in front.

  • Everything had to be coordinated.

  • And then you need to practice.

  • You need to do something.

  • You need to do it day in and day out.

  • You need to do it again and again and again.

  • With that you get the experience and experience are found.

  • It's something that you will pay for.

  • You can't buy it.

  • You cannot buy.

  • If you went to somewhere and say, Please could you give me experience for doing this?

  • And it's still it in yourself.

  • You can't do it.

  • You gotta go through pain.

  • You've got to make the mistakes and with those mistakes, serious mistakes, because that's what experiences.

  • It's a serious mistakes.

  • You find a way how not to do something.

  • You keep finding a way, how not to do something.

  • Keep finding a way, doctor.

  • But I found that I learned a lot.

  • I learned a lot in this, but that experience will stand you, and that's why you keep doing the same thing.

  • He repeating it until you perfected.

  • And then you prove upon that and timing timing is crucial.

  • When they took off for the for the Apollo mission, it had to be timed at a delicate time, a particular place.

  • You need to be at a particular place to do the right thing at the right time.

  • You tried to do it at the wrong time.

  • It won't work, although all your preparations in place, everything is out.

  • Is there the timing's crucial timing for Elliot to be in Vienna?

  • There was timing when the car in front of him with projecting beams on the front and had to be in perfect time.

  • He had to keep two minutes and 50 seconds per kilometer timing for everything down to the nanosecond.

  • And if you've got the timing right and you got the vision, they got the belief you got the dedication.

  • You got a team, sport.

  • You got the practice.

  • You got the experience.

  • You perfected it.

  • The timing is absolutely crucial on when you've done that, you've repeated again.

  • You can do it in a different experience.

  • What you've done here, you can translate elsewhere.

  • Now, how does this relate to me?

  • I look at it and I thought about the bigger problems.

  • Maybe the barriers.

  • I went from the Punjab region at the age of 10 4 days short in August 1969 on I was They're used to the hot weather and a job you to the Punjabi language used to Punjabi food.

  • You stupid job culture on DDE, Adam my I was in the fourth grade at school on Dhe.

  • I'd learned in those days, you know, to write on the slate and what we had No computers, no books, et cetera.

  • I'm I left it In a strange country.

  • The weather was different.

  • The food was different.

  • The culture was different.

  • The language is different.

  • I'm I don't know where it was what was doing.

  • But we were there.

  • And one thing I noticed when we there was the fact that I had to adapt, I had to change.

  • Necessity was going to be the mother of invention.

  • I had to do these things, and that, for me, was a way to learn on the way to adapt on the way I got my experiences.

  • The first experience I got was go with my father.

  • Three months into school, Junior school, the frog march me over snowy, icy pavements.

  • Five miles.

  • And you took me to a place where somebody he found out I had a house for sale and he asked me to interpret it for you.

  • He said, We want to buy this house.

  • That's it, Poppa, I don't know any English, he says.

  • You've been to school for three months, and somehow we want to communicate somehow with Jess stations or otherwise.

  • We ended up buying the house.

  • We ended up being there.

  • The guy give me it back, remembers clearly.

  • I had chill.

  • Blaine's in my hands, ill equipped tight shoes under your jumper on icy winds on the pain was excruciating.

  • And those learnings for me and I knew that we were there then and there was no choice but to move forward.

  • The house had bear minimums, floorboards which involved now but the women once a week.

  • We had a bath water wondering a water bucket.

  • You know that's off fire once a week to dry and keep you warm.

  • After the bath, we lived in cold conditions, slept in one bed.

  • But I knew that we had to break this.

  • It was a poverty And what did together remember that we gotta milk brand.

  • He was seven of 10.

  • We persuaded this guy somehow to give them it right.

  • And we get a before call in the morning before going to school and we do the milk round.

  • Then good school all day Come back and then, you know, we were glad to be out, to be honest, because there's better conditions than home.

  • It's cold, we go to school.

  • But the Milgram soon because the police patrolling one day decided that do too young to do this, but not to be deterred.

  • Knowing where my target Waas knowing where I was going knowing that we had to do this.

  • I found myself a paper round delivering newspapers.

  • So in the morning before school, get up our behalf delivering newspapers 70 stories open to flock block flat.

  • Sometimes it works sometimes get around three miles of delivering newspapers.

  • But he bought with money in the evening after school on Saturday morning, Saturday evening on Sunday morning.

  • And this is a lot.

  • So I got myself a bike with a little bit of money that I saved, and I was fooling myself up on these.

  • My experiences are new vision, waas.

  • It's to break our poverty and had a belief that I could do it.

  • I have that dedication to do it on dhe.

  • I've got my brother enrolled as my team collaborator.

  • You know, we went round and we've perfected the route off living the newspapers to maximize it to minimize that time.

  • And this went on until such timers with himself a part time job, that part time job involved doing separate job on DDE.

  • This board is more money, and what I was finding, though going to school was the fact that my English wasn't very good.

  • My color was different on Dhe wasn't really accepted.

  • But one thing I found, I had a strength look.

  • Lee.

  • In India, the math is one language worldwide on Atlantic.

  • What?

  • Well, and I was quite advanced on dhe from self taught Andi are used to do the homework for other kids on.

  • There was an acceptance.

  • So with this on DDE, we built on it, were built on it and built on it to a point where we got our own business.

  • We built it into the largest Porsche dealership in Europe on 10 years later.

  • After that in 10 years ago came back to India again.

  • A different culture, a different language at returned all over again.

  • And now we have a system where the entire art CEOs are digitized.

  • Every single vehicle is digitized in India.

  • There's efficiency, this accuracy.

  • There's a system that everybody can use their business led, intelligent decisions.

  • I think the the end result is that if you really want to, if you really want to, if the desire is there, you can really do whatever you put your mind to.

  • You can do it after, innit?

  • And I promise you, anybody here is that dedicate themselves.

  • If they team up with people, collaborate with people and they can do it.

  • You can break those barriers.

  • You have it inside you.

  • I'm living proof of it.

  • Thank you.

it is a pleasure to be here.

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A2 初級

何でも成功させて達成するための決意と献身。| TEDxKanke|Nirmal Saranna|TEDxKanke (Determination and Dedication to Succeed and Achieve Anything. | Nirmal Saranna | TEDxKanke)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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