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  • I want everyone to take a really deep breath because I'm gonna do that right now, too.

  • What are the consequences for not looking toe artists to help address the health care crisis in the US?

  • The consequence is stay in disconnected from our power to make the connections we need to be healthy.

  • Health comes from the word hole.

  • We need to look at the example and presence of artists who elevate our connections so that we can be healthy because we can be whole healthcare divides us into parts and specialists who treat those parts.

  • The psychologist you see for your mind doesn't talk to the doctor.

  • You see for your body and these divisions formed silos.

  • And within these silos we become fragmented and erased.

  • You all may not be artists, but you are creators, and it's up to you to find the creative acts of connection that will make you feel whole for you.

  • Silas may look more like being in a degree that doesn't really use your talents or being in a profession where you're not making the impact you want to.

  • And for many it means living with overlapping health conditions.

  • When I was 14.

  • I learned firsthand what the silos of healthcare can do to fragment and erased your identity.

  • When I was 14 I came out as being gay to my parents, and within one month I had lost £20.

  • I went to my doctor and said, I I came out and I am feeling so sick.

  • My heart is beating so fast and so loud and so right there they did an E k g.

  • The results came back normal.

  • I was sent home.

  • I went back to the doctor and said, I am feeling so sick and they said, OK, we're going to send you a heart doctor.

  • It turns out I have a really good looking heart and I was sent home, and then I started to lose my vision and I went back to the doctor and they said to send you to an eye doctor and I was so excited because I did get a prescription for glasses and that was a fashion statement I had wanted at the time.

  • But I actually started to feel even worse, and I was sent home, and often when things can't be described or explained, you get sent to the psychologist, we were told you should probably see, See a psychologist.

  • My feelings of being sick were not coming from coming out if the doctor had asked me well, but how is that making you feel?

  • I would have said, You know, I've never felt more relieved in my life, and yet I still feel like I'm going to die.

  • My blood was becoming toxic from high blood sugar from undiagnosed type one diabetes silos can look like the expertise we have.

  • If any one of those doctors had looked at me as a full person, they could have seen the signs and made the diagnosis.

  • We found out because my mom took a cup of urine to the doctor before school one day and forced them to test it.

  • Have any of you ever felt erased or fragmented in the health care system?

  • At one point we all become patients.

  • My name is Justice Harris.

  • I'm an artist.

  • I'm a designer.

  • I'm gay.

  • I'm someone with diabetes, and I've utilized the arts to become an expert patient.

  • At this point, you're probably wondering Well, Okay, where are the arts and health care?

  • What do artists have to do with this?

  • My definition of art is what it's like to be alive.

  • Do the expanded perspective of art.

  • This can look like what a studio is being connected to monitors and the tenants of being an artist and thinking like an artist are experimenting despite the unknown creating.

  • Even if you're not an expert and collaborating, even if you haven't found the perfect reason yet.

  • These are images of me in medical studies that I signed up for and I started with experimenting, asking, What does this mean?

  • What did these grass mean?

  • What are these charts mean?

  • Asking the people running the study, What did they understand?

  • And you know what?

  • I realized they understood a lot more than I did, and the images and information they saw about my body was more meaningful to them than it was to me.

  • This image is of diabetes data from one day insulin levels, blood sugar levels.

  • This comes from the data silo that shows this is what it looks like.

  • This is what your health is.

  • And I thought there has to be a better way to present this because this is just what one month looks like the solely medical way to look at the body and so tenant to create, even if you're not an expert.

  • I went to the Chicago Public Library, who has a maker lab, and the librarians were teaching three d printing.

  • And I said, I want to make something as tangible as I am to show my health something that comes from my own data.

  • And so the sculpture shows Monday to Sunday, the same information from those graphs on forms that summarize that information in a way that's meaningful to me, where an entire month can be looked at and compared, where each side is a week and where the forms have a connection to nature and ways that we look about the world, where high blood sugars are like the peaks of a mounted where days that went well and were smoother, like the smooth ridges of the hell and where days with a profound low blood sugar had a depth like the depths of the earth.

  • And not just one month but three months could be looked at and understood at a glance where a time on the left that had higher blood sugar, also shown by the color red smoothed out into softer shapes and forms with the yellow and green sculptures.

  • Would also happened, though, was that other people started reaching out to me.

  • They wanted to see what their data and what their body could look like outside of the solely medical.

  • This is a portrait of me, and it is a portrait of someone else with diabetes holding their data.

  • It is a picture of people beyond the solely medical, and one of the biggest impacts was actually starting to attract a community of people, not just to understand the information about my body that's at an individual level.

  • But what can the arts do?

  • Toe look at something the size of a city.

  • I live in Chicago, and this is what data looks like when you look at just the blocks that our research is that something that is easy to understand for many people.

  • So something like the commute of the train line on your way to work from home became a language to look at health data, transforming life expectancy and diabetes data into something that people could phrase like.

  • They were on the commute in Chicago and see the health of the city in a different way in a way that they could touch in a way that was undeniable.

  • And this led to something that was much bigger actually something that was the size of the United States.

  • Because by doing this I learned that people with diabetes live 13 years less than people do on average in the U.

  • S.

  • And so suddenly it became a very personal topic, and I wanted to create a system that could make it individual and understood at a personal level.

  • And so 10 it three a thinking like an artist is collaborating.

  • I reached out to a software engineer who had diabetes, and we designed a system where life expectancy, in this case on the left with the bright white figure on average could be compared to the figure on the right that is speckled and hazy and shows someone with a life expectancy that is possible for someone like me.

  • We created a system where people could walk behind the monitor with a special camera mounted to it and see themselves and the life expectancy mapped out into their own body from ZIP codes across the United States and from different time periods in a way that it was almost like taking a selfie and spoke a different language about health, art and communicating.

  • Health information takes more than the form of visual art.

  • There are other artists breaking silos in other mediums.

  • Marinas up.

  • Lena is activist, scholar and puppeteer.

  • The work they do uses puppetry to embody the experience of chronic illness so it can be understood outside of the body where people can relate to their lives in a different way.

  • Thousands of clinicians, adults and Children have experienced their work across the country.

  • Yoka son is a musician, and Yoko's work focuses on what might be the last sound you hear in the hospital.

  • Do you want it to be the beeping of alarms?

  • Or if you're a physician, how do you manage the alarm fatigue every day that creates hazards for your patients.

  • Yoko's mission is to bring sound designed to our experience and dignity, and hospitals and fashion sky Kuba Kuba is creating a fashion line for the full spectrum of gender size and ability.

  • As a queer crypt designer, they also have a zine and look at fashion and clothing as a second skin.

  • The role of the artist isn't only to make things that are more beautiful in our society, but it's also to go into places with the absence of connection and the absence of imagination are the most profound.

  • Recently, I spent two weeks at a medical facility here in North Carolina.

  • I did medical simulations of mannequins, I toward their state of the art facilities, and I talked with the staff stuff.

  • And people in medicine across the country have shared their experience with depression, and suicide is some of the highest in the nation.

  • In fact, for doctors, it's the highest of any profession.

  • This is a crisis, but it is also a moment for collaboration.

  • Time and time again, they said, The thing that's so hard for us is a hard to imagine what it might be like any other way.

  • Why couldn't this be what the doctor's office had looked like when I was 14 full of color, full of life through the expanded lens of art?

  • Why couldn't it be not just to look at data but your view our entire life?

  • Five years ago, when I realized that the health care system didn't cater to my full humanity.

  • I reached out to those professionals.

  • I didn't know what the answer is to be.

  • I didn't know where this would lead, just like artists do every time they go to the studio being prepared for the unknown and being okay with it.

  • What would your life look like if you allowed yourself to experience your full house?

  • Adopting some of the tenants of thinking like an artist of collaborating of creating, despite not being the expert and of experimenting despite the profound unknown?

  • My request to you is to consider yourself creators.

  • Now your studio is where you are right now.

  • Your act's reaching out for help and helping others, our creative acts that you have access to.

  • Right now, I am not a Renaissance artist and you are not Renaissance people.

  • We are not like Divinci, and that's okay.

  • Taking the action to connect with someone into the unknown and collaborate can help us form Renaissance communities.

e.

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アーティストはヘルスケアを癒す鍵|ジャスタス・ハリス|TEDxWakeForestU (Artists are Key to Healing Healthcare | Justus Harris | TEDxWakeForestU)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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