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  • please go to the line the computer guy dot com, in order to view schematics, code and Maur for the projects that you are learning about.

  • Welcome back.

  • So today is video.

  • I'm going to give you an introduction to cloud computing.

  • So Cloud computing is one of those things.

  • That's a very simple concept.

  • But then people get very confused with all of the different terminology, and then it kind of sort of makes their head explode.

  • The important thing to understand when you're dealing with cloud computing is you need to be looking at solving problems, figure out what your problem is, and then you figure out what technology you were going to use to solve that problem.

  • Ah, lot of times people, when they get into cloud computing, a hyper focus on specific technologies, whether it's virtual is ations or sands platforms, a service serverless, architectural, service oriented architecture, they focus on some specific thing, and it's kind of what they say.

  • You know, if you've got a hammer, everything is a nail.

  • That's what a lot of cloud technicians look like.

  • They understand one type of cloud technology and they're gonna you're just gonna bang the hell out of any problem that they find with it.

  • So the important thing that I really want you to be thinking about when you start thinking about cloud computing, you need to look at what your problem is.

  • You need to look at what your requirements are, and then you go out there and you find a solution.

  • The solution.

  • Maybe some very expensive internal private hybrid cloud that's gonna cost millions and millions and millions of dollars.

  • Or it may be spending up some some virtual instance on something like Digital Ocean that's gonna cost you $5 a month.

  • The important thing to understand is to be thinking about what are you actually trying to accomplish and then figure out the tool for that?

  • Not everything is a nail, I swear.

  • Thio.

  • So one of the big things that you need to be thinking about when you start thinking about cloud computing is now in the modern world with cloud computing.

  • When you think of service is even when you think of servers, you now need to no longer think about a specific box that you can literally 0.2 and says that box does X so for me as somebody who got his M c s e literally NT 4.0, back in like the 99 2000 time frame.

  • The thing is, back them.

  • When we had servers, we had servers that offered specific service is to our client computers.

  • So if you're looking at something like active Directory, if you're looking at something like databases, if you were looking at something like email, you could walk into my server room and I could say That's the active directory server and that's the exchange server and that's the database server, and that's don't ask me about that.

  • That one doesn't a lot of stuff for the company, but we're just as a mess.

  • I had some ass, right?

  • But the important thing, the important thing to realize is not that long ago is that if you were offering a service is to client systems or you're offering service is to the user, you could literally go and you could point at the physical machine, and you could say that machine does X, Y and Z.

  • The thing is, to realize with cloud computing is that is not the case.

  • You do the configurations you load the configuration somewhere, and then basically what you can say is it's kind of like, you know, one of those well, in that direction, right, like our service is run on Amazon.

  • What's served?

  • What specific server runs that service?

  • I have no idea.

  • I probably might not even know what state the server is it quite literally, or even again with private clouds.

  • When you think about private clouds, one of big things with private clouds, you can do all these cool things with what's called clustering.

  • So what you have is when you have clustering, as you have multiple physical machines that are all able to communicate with each other, and then what they're able to do is they're literally able to in real time to move around things like Tasks, Service's virtual machines, the whole nine yards to whatever physical hardware is the most appropriate.

  • So I could have 10.

  • Let's save VM where hyper visors, so via more hyper visors, a type of virtualization technology, so I could have 10 you nosy on servers with VM wear hyper visor installed on them, and those 10 physical machines are responsible for however, many of virtual machines, then I have running well.

  • The thing is, is VM wear can automatically move instances of virtual machines around as as required.

  • So let's say you have something like a video encoding, so you have a server that's responsible for video.

  • Cody.

  • Now, most of the time right that server isn't doing is literally not doing anything right.

  • It's just sitting there.

  • It's it's running because it needs to run.

  • But otherwise it's not really using any ram.

  • It's not really using any storage, and it really isn't using a CPU right.

  • It's just is just a server in the state of waiting for a client to request something for it.

  • So if you have a cluster of virtual machines, what can happen with the M, where museum, where you can put the instance of that encoding server onto a specific machine that doesn't have a lot of resource, is doesn't have a lot of capability because it doesn't need a lot of resurfaces capability?

  • Now imagine it's 10 o'clock in the morning.

  • Your video editors have finished with their their first productions for the day, and they're now pumping their video files to now be encoded.

  • What can happen is the The hyper visors are able to communicate and basically that instance of the machines to the instance of machine that's sitting on that very low resource server that physical hardware can now be automatically moved to, Let's say, a server that has 128 gigs of Ram PC.

  • I expressed solid state drives, you know, for eight cores eon processors, the whole nine yards.

  • So basically, as people need actually use that server to do video encoding, the instance of that server has now moved to that higher quality hardware.

  • It then does all the video encoding that is being asked to dio when it gets done with that, it might wait five or 10 minutes just to verify.

  • Nobody else needs its help anymore, and then after that, it gets automatically moved back.

  • So if you walk in and you have a private cloud, you have a V M where cluster and basically somebody asks you where is that encoder server running again, depending on the time of day, depending them alone, depending on your just like that rack, like literally just go.

  • I don't right now.

  • Right now.

  • I can't.

  • I could figure it out if I really wanted Thio, but it's like it's running somewhere in the rack.

  • It might be sitting there up on that low resource system right now because it may not be being used or the video editors may be hammering the hell out of it.

  • And it's down on this higher and a server at the bottom that requires a lot of power.

  • I don't know.

  • That's kind of all automatically done.

  • And so that's one of the big things to be thinking about with Cloud Computing with cloud computing.

  • What we're really talking about is that you set up service is you make service is available to your clients and users, but you can't physically point toe a box and say that box is providing X y or Z service.

  • Thea other thing.

  • Once you start dealing with a cloud computing is that we start doing something called have distracting all the components of the server right, so back in the day and you would have a server and that server would have everything on it.

  • So basically have a physical server.

  • That visible server has a however much Ram has.

  • A CPU has hard drive whole nine yards.

  • You then install an operating system onto that server.

  • You then stunts.

  • All your service is on to that operating system, right?

  • So that physical box has everything that you need.

  • So the storage is on there.

  • The processing is on there.

  • Everything is on there.

  • What cloud computing?

  • When the cool things that we could do is we can rip apart that entire concept.

  • And now the compute and the storage and even the networking could be ripped apart, and they could be interacted with as their own individual components in their own individual things.

  • So now it's storage again.

  • We start talking about that work civilization cluster.

  • So let's say we have 10 hyper visors in a cluster.

  • Mother question that has to be asked is, Well, wait a minute.

  • Where is the story?

  • If you have some server and has a lot of data storage, you can't just instantaneously be able to move.

  • Ah, 100 gigs of data amongst all of the systems.

  • How does that work?

  • Well, how that works is the virtual cluster that you have.

  • That's all the CPI that has the processors that has the ram that has those types of things.

  • But the actual storage distorted for the operating system most likely resigns and something called a sand a storage area network.

  • So basically, you have this cluster of compute here and then over here you have a cluster of story, so store it has now literally been separated from the compute, and so now you can interact with them separately.

  • And so that's one of the things that you you can also do in the cloud computing world.

  • Is your rip apart all of these different components of what creates a server, and then you can interact with them individually.

  • So that's one of things is very interesting, something called a server, less architecture.

  • That's one of things that all the cool kids we're looking at right now we're literally It's really cool.

  • You can write scripts, and then the actual compute is offered to you just as a service just like D A.

  • C p or D.

  • N S is so you can literally actually call compute on When you call Compute.

  • You don't necessarily know if it's a Lennox box, even in the compute or a UNIX box.

  • Even the compute where you gonna Microsoft windows box giving you compute.

  • Basically, what you're able to do is when you have scripts, you can have those scripts.

  • You say what?

  • That the input data is.

  • You say where you want that data output be again.

  • So if you're talking about something like video encoding and then what you could do is you can actually call to compute, and basically you can say Run, run this command against this file.

  • So let's say you want to encode a video in a 10 80 p.

  • So you can say is call this compute to encode this file in 10 80 p and out put it over here and then you're literally just calling.

  • And so again, it's not Windows.

  • It's not you, Nexus, not Lennox.

  • You're not worrying about all these things you're just able to actually call.

  • That is an individual service.

  • So these are some of the things that you need be thinking about in the cloud computing world, and that's why it's so important.

  • When you think about cloud computing, you don't try to hit it, Okay, because that's what so many people do, right?

  • So many people got their M CSC is they know how Windows 2012 server works.

  • They know how Lennox server works, you know.

  • And so then what they do is they try.

  • They try to take that they trying to take old school system administration and simply throw it on the cloud.

  • And that's just that's just foolishness would be like taking.

  • It would be saying if let's say, you know, the future of transportation is going to be aired.

  • Travel that would be like trying to throw wings literally on a car would be like going out my Ford F 1 50 trying to Super Blue Wings on and saying, Well, that's gonna be a flying car someday.

  • Like No, that's no.

  • You just superglued wings onto a truck.

  • That's probably a really bad idea, All right, well, you want to do if you want to create a new aircraft, is you actually build a new aircraft from the ground up, And so these are some of the things that you could be thinking about when you start looking at the cloud computing environment and how you're going to be interacting with the cloud computing environment.

  • So the first thing that we have to talk about is.

  • Where did the name cloud come from?

  • We start talking about cloud computing and we start talking about the cloud.

  • The question is, where did this terminology come from?

  • And so why is it important?

  • Don't understand that we have to go back to at least the 19 nineties.

  • We're gonna go back to the 19 nineties, goes That's where I started in the story.

  • It probably goes back a lot farther than that.

  • Back then, we were talking about the cloud a lot, but we weren't actually talking about cloud computing.

  • We were talking about the cloud in regards to networking.

  • So what I mean by that is so we were dealing with our own networks back then, right?

  • So you would have a router here.

  • And let's say the I P addresses 1 92 to 1 68 11 and under that router, you would have a server, and that would be, you know, not 10 1 92.1 68 1.10 And then that server, you know, under that would have a lot of different client machines, and they would all have their standard I P addresses and the thing is with this network right here.

  • We would know everything that was going on with this network.

  • We would know the modem or the and Tran.

  • We would know the rounder.

  • We would know the switch.

  • We would know the servers.

  • We would know all the host machines.

  • We would know the D, A, c P and the sub net masks.

  • We would know that D.

  • N s basically all this right here.

  • We would diagram out and we would know everything that was going on in our network.

  • Now let's say that this was a satellite office.

  • So let's say we have some kind of a company.

  • That company has one major headquarters, you know, back somewhere.

  • You know, they have a headquarters, and this is a satellite office that that's off on the other side of the country.

  • And so then, basically, we need to know how our host computers and how our servers from here will be able to communicate with the computers and the servers back at H.

  • Q.

  • Now at the H.

  • Q.

  • Again, we have a router there, and let's say they have a I P address.

  • Pretend 011 right, so that's there some that mask under that?

  • They have a whole crap ton of servers going on.

  • They have lots of networking equipment.

  • They have lots of host machines.

  • And they have, you know, they have lots of systems doing things.

  • And so we would also have all of this diagrammed out.

  • So we know all the servers.

  • We would know all the rounders.

  • We would know all the switches, we would know all the host machines.

  • All of this would be diagram to the nth degree.

  • And so, basically, what would happen?

  • And so if you have some client machine over here and it needs to communicate with a server over here, then we would be able to figure out what the routing path should be through our network for the satellite office.

  • And then once, once the traffic gets to the H Q once it gets attend, not one r Tenn 10.0 not one, not one.

  • Once it gets to their rounder, then the router and the network would then make sure that the packets the traffic gets routed to the appropriate surfer.

  • So basically, we understand how the traffic moves here, and we understand how the traffic moves here.

  • But the question is, is how do you connect the satellite office back to the headquarters?

  • Well, you have to connect it through what we called the club.

  • And so when we talk about the cloud back in the day, all the cloud meant, really, all the clouds still means is the Internet right?

  • So, basically, you have your external When you have your abs, are you have your external I P address.

  • Basically, that's the external row double I p address.

  • Your egg headquarters has its own external round herbal I p address, and what you do is you point the traffic at their external I p address, and they point their traffic at your external I P address.

  • Now the thing is, with the Internet, there's a lot of networking going on on the Internet.

  • Obviously again, there are what are called core routers.

  • There are course, which is there's lots of fancy, extraordinarily expensive equipment, and that extraordinarily expensive equipment is what routes the traffic from your satellite office, you know, over to the headquarters and then from the headquarters.

  • It routes it back to your satellite office.

  • Well, the thing is, with all this route these routers and this networking equipment on the Internet.

  • How traffic is modelled.

  • How traffic is moving really depends on what the current state of conditions are, right?

  • So again, there are literally thousands or millions of routers and pieces of networking equipment, uh, that the Internet service providers use.

  • And so what happens is they're all communicating to each other with something called rounding protocols.

  • And they're figuring out, you know what?

  • They're figuring out what the connection is working best, you know?

  • So this is a good connection, and they're figuring out what connections air dead.

  • For some reason, they're figuring out what connections are fast.

  • So let's say this one's fast.

  • They're figuring out what connections are slow and basically threw a rounding protocols.

  • All this networking equipment is trying to figure the fastest, most efficient way to get a packet from your external I P address to wherever you're going external.

  • I p address.

  • And the thing is, this literally this changes a moment by moment, just may change second by second.

  • So if I have traffic coming here, may bounce here, here, here, here, here, and then go over here and then traffic going back, make it bounced all the way up here and then down here and then traffic.

  • You know, two seconds later, we'll go this way.

  • Basically, this is all being dynamically around.

  • It s so that's where you here Sometimes when you hear about curious things with something called BTP, which is the routing protocol and for some reason, like entire cities, Internet traffic will randomly get routed to China.

  • Uh, yeah, that's because with how the communication happens with how the routing protocols work, basically dynamically, all of that, all the traffic is automatically being sent the way that the system thinks is most appropriate.

  • And sometimes it sends traffic through China.

  • And so the important thing to understand here, why we started calling this the cloud is because it really doesn't matter, right?

  • If I'm trying to get to this I p address and you're trying to get to this I p address, you don't really care if your traffic goes through this over down here or if it goes up and over.

  • Basically, you just say, OK, it leaves.

  • It leaves our network, and it hits the cloud.

  • It goes from the cloud and it hits their network.

  • It leaves their network.

  • It hits the cloud.

  • It goes from the cloud and hits our in our.

  • So basically the cloud is just this ugly, nasty mess that somehow all of the traffic it's routed through right.

  • Some of the routers are secure, and you should be able to trust them.

  • Many of the raptors and pieces of networking equipment are insecure and again, that's one thing to be thinking about the client.

  • Basically, with this, you have no idea of the trust of the what you'