Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Hey guys! Welcome to dinner.

  • Thanks for having dinner with us.

  • We had this idea to do a video about American English conversation with our family at dinner,

  • and then we thought, that's a terrible idea, because we have a baby and a toddler.

  • So I said, why don't we just sit down to dinner?

  • And then I started seeing about this thing called a mukbang.

  • And so we're kind of doing that, kind of not, mostly, we're just eating dinner with you,

  • and we're going to turn it into an English conversation lesson. So whenever we're talking,

  • and some phrasal verb or idiom or vocabulary word comes up, that I think you might not know,

  • or that I want to explain, you'll see it on screen in red, red and white text, and then at the end of the video,

  • I'm going to sit down, we're going to go over all of these terms. So, let's start.

  • Cheers, David!

  • Cheers.

  • >> Cheers everybody. >> Thank you for joining me at dinner.

  • Now David's being a really good sport by joining me here.

  • As you can see, we only have one plate of food, and it's huge.

  • So I was reading an article about eating on YouTube,

  • and it was talking about this thing that they called a mukbang,

  • which is, I'm doing an English pronunciation of it, but the origin is two Korean words put together.

  • But basically, people were making videos of themselves eating and then

  • posting that, and people were eating with them, so they wouldn't feel like they're eating alone.

  • And then it kind of turned into this thing where people were binging on mass amounts of food,

  • and that's kind of what we're doing.

  • Seems like a great idea to me.

  • Yeah. When I told David I wanted to do this, he got really excited

  • because he loves binging on mass amounts of food.

  • Now, obviously we're not going to finish this, right?

  • We'll see.

  • Okay, but the thing about it is, I've watched a few mukbang videos,

  • it involves one huge plate of food, multiple people eating off of it, mouth noises are encouraged,

  • sloppy eating is encouraged.

  • Wow.

  • So feel free.

  • Um, and let's just dig in and see... See what happens.

  • You say what you're eating?

  • Yeah, I guess we do.

  • Okay, so we got carryout from a local indian restaurant, we have samosas, we have naan,

  • a big pile of rice underneath, and then some saag paneer, and some chicken tikka masala.

  • And I'm vegetarian, mostly.

  • I eat almost no meat, except I do eat this chicken tikka masala because it's...

  • >> ...that good. >> that's how good it is.

  • All right, so I'm actually, I feel embarrassed to start.

  • I don't.

  • Okay, I'm going to let you start then. I'm just going to have another sip of wine.

  • I'm hungry.

  • While I think about getting ready to eat in front of the camera.

  • So good.

  • I know. We know. This food is so good that's why we decided to get this.

  • It's unbelievable.

  • We were like if there's anything that we can eat a ton of, it's this.

  • So anyway, David you've been watching a few of these mukbang videos, right?

  • Yeah.

  • What do you think?

  • What do I think of the idea?

  • You know, I have my elbow on the table.

  • >> that's actually like... >> that's not okay.

  • Considered bad manners.

  • Especially when I'm trying to get out a huge plate of food.

  • Let me take it off.

  • So what did you...well, first of all, the thing I love about YouTube is niches can flourish.

  • Yeah.

  • Right? I mean most people would not have thought a video of someone eating a meal

  • would be that big of a deal.

  • 'Cause it's ridiculous.

  • But people love it, like, these videos have millions of views. Okay, I'm going to take my first bite.

  • Oh. That reminds me.

  • I've been having problems with my jaw lately.

  • I can't open it that much, and I, I got the first part of a root canal yesterday,

  • finally, after like, months of pain and different dentist appointments.

  • Going to have it finished next week, so that's that makes it extra awkward to try to eat on camera,

  • when you can barely open your mouth.

  • Like, I open my mouth and not enough and food falls off my fork because I was not able to open my jaw enough.

  • So I'm going to take a little bites.

  • Messy eating.

  • A little messy.

  • Anyway, what I was saying was, that's what's so great about YouTube is that

  • there's so much content there that even something that seems like almost no one would watch it,

  • there are still millions of people to watch it.

  • And it was interesting, some people were talking about

  • they had like loss of appetite due to various problems in their lives,

  • and that watching these videos of people really loving food, kind of help them get their appetite back.

  • I could see it going the other way, too. But no, I'm glad it worked for them.

  • I can see it going the other way as well.

  • Also, I noticed there seems to be a disproportionate amount of mukbangs on seafood.

  • Oh yeah, I noticed that too. No, thanks.

  • >> I think it's partly because... >> maybe how it started...

  • That food, like, there's a lot of slurping, with crab legs and mussels and stuff.

  • Part of it is like, the sound, people like the sound.

  • Is this one mint?

  • Hmm mm. Isn't it?

  • >> What would you say? >> I don't know.

  • Yeah. Herb, general herb.

  • I was just doing a video on silent letters, herb.

  • I think they say the H in British English.

  • But we don't in American English. Isn't that funny?

  • Samosa got cold. Shame.

  • Shame that.

  • David went to go get more water.

  • More wine, too.

  • That's got to be a nice sound. I guess I'll have a little more.

  • For the past 3 weeks, I've been so doped up on pain killers,

  • that I've not been having any wine or anything to drink ever.

  • And today is the first day. Wait, did I take some this morning?

  • >> not wine. >> I did.

  • I did. So today's the first day I haven't had pain killers.

  • >> cheers. >> cheers to that.

  • And yeah I did take it this morning, I mean I've been taking it every four hours, and still hurting all the time.

  • When he was digging in...

  • Oh, man!

  • I know. He said it was worse than... Worse than average, way worse than average. What?

  • Meal conversation.

  • It's fine. It's a root canal. It's not gross.

  • A little bit.

  • Not really.

  • The naan is so good.

  • I thought you didn't usually care for the naan,

  • No, it's not that I don't care for it. I usually don't have room for it.

  • Oh, that's fair.

  • Also, we only get one. Stoney loves it.

  • Right. He eats most of it.

  • You love it so I'm like okay, I'll back off, I'll let these people eat their naan.

  • Alright.

  • Whereas if you were going to try to eat my samosa, I would be like, no.

  • Oh yeah, I know that.

  • You may not.

  • Okay, here's a story David and I had not been dating for very long, and we took a trip.

  • Yeah.

  • We went to Montreal with some friends and we went out to a kind of nice dinner.

  • And they brought all these small plates but it was a small plates kind of place. And one of them was kimchi.

  • And I had it sitting there on my plate for a long time because I wasn't sure yet what I wanted to eat it with.

  • I was saving it and David really casually takes his fork

  • and just like about to stab it to take it for himself because he's like 'this woman doesn't want this

  • kimchi 'cause it's just sitting on her plate'.

  • Luckily, I had my hand here, and it went

  • It was just like cat-like reflexes. I saw his fork going in, and I went--

  • >> Yep, you did. >> And I said: I'm saving that.

  • So he knows. Certain foods...

  • Don't mess.

  • Don't take Rachel's portion.

  • We got a lot of work to do here.

  • Leftovers.

  • Tomorrow night's dinner.

  • All right. Well, I can stop.

  • All right.

  • We'll wrap it up.

  • And I'm going to have a lot of fun going through and watching this,

  • and picking all those words that we're going to use, so guys don't go anywhere because right now,

  • we're going to have the lesson that goes with this conversation.

  • Five, four, three, two, one.

  • Ok, the first word up was 'mukbang'.

  • We talked about this a little. It's a genre of online video where people record themselves eating a meal.

  • The word is derived from the Korean words for eating and broadcast.

  • What did you think of this format? Was it gross watching us eat? Was it fun?

  • Did you feel like you were sitting at our dinner table?

  • >> Cheers, David. >> Cheers!

  • The next word was 'cheers'.

  • There's a good chance you know this is the word we toast with in American English.

  • I have a longer video lesson on that topic, which I'll link to at the end of this video,

  • you can see the link in the video description.

  • It's used to express good wishes.

  • In the UK, you can also use it not just in a toast but when you're parting ways with someone.

  • See you, cheers.

  • That's not at all common in the US.

  • A cheer is also a showing of support from a crowd, like at a sporting event.

  • [crowd cheering]

  • Then of course we have a cheerleader, whose job it is to get the crowd excited.

  • Now, David's being a really good sport by joining me here.

  • A 'good sport' is someone who can remain positive when something goes wrong,

  • or agree to do something that he or she might not really want to do.

  • I thought David was being a good sport by joining me in my idea to eat dinner on camera, but really, he enjoyed it.

  • But basically, people were making videos of themselves eating and then posting that.

  • And people were eating with them so they don't feel like they were eating alone.

  • And then it kind of turned into this thing where people were binging on mass amounts of food

  • >> and that's kind of what we're doing. >> Seems like a great idea to me.

  • Binging on mass amounts of food.

  • So the word to 'binge' means to do something in excess for a short period of time.

  • We use it with the preposition 'on'; you can binge on food or alcohol.

  • As I said in the video, in mukbangs, people binge on a mass amount of food.

  • Mass, a large number, a large amount. You could say, she has a mass following.

  • She has a massive amount of followers.

  • With binge, aside from food or drink, we also use it with TV. Binge watching.

  • With streaming programs, you can now watch all of the episodes of a season of a show, or the whole series.

  • You used to have to wait every week for one half-hour show to come out.

  • But now with these services like Netflix, you can binge-watch Friends.

  • You can log on and watch episode after episode all weekend. What did you do last weekend?

  • I binge-watched Friends.

  • Or you might hear someone describe a show as binge-worthy.

  • That means it's worth it to spend all weekend watching that show.

  • Let's just dig in and see...see what happens.

  • >> When he was digging in... >> Oh, man!

  • I know. He said it was worse than...worse than average.

  • Dig in.

  • Now, in the course of this conversation, we used this phrase two really different ways.

  • Let's just dig in and see...see what happens.

  • We used it to describe eating. To dig means to start eating. Go ahead, dig in.

  • >> When he was digging in... >> Oh, man!

  • I know. He said it was worse than...worse than average.

  • But we also use it to talk about something sharp, penetrating something.

  • We use it with fingernails. You're digging into my arm. Or, the back of my shoe is digging into my heel.

  • I used to talk about the dentist digging into my gum.

  • When he was digging in...

  • Oh, man!

  • I know. He said it was worse than...worse than average.

  • There's a third way we use it, and that means to mentally prepare to work through a hard situation

  • or do some hard work.

  • For example, if there's something at work that you really don't want to work on, you could say,

  • This project is going to be so much work, but I need to just dig in and do it. Dig in.

  • Okay, so, we got carry-out.

  • Carry out. This is different from delivery. For carry out, you call the restaurant to order, or you order it online,

  • and then you go pick it up.

  • I don't feel like cooking. Let's get carry out.

  • And I'm vegetarian. Mostly.

  • A vegetarian is someone who doesn't eat meat.

  • I call myself vegetarian, but if I eat chicken every once in a while, come on Rachel, you're not a vegetarian.

  • This is a five-syllable word with stress on the middle syllable. Vege-tar-ian. Vegetarian.

  • In the word 'vegetable', we drop the second E. VEG-table.

  • But in 'vegetarian', we do say it. Vege-- It's the schwa. Vegetarian.

  • If there's anything we can eat a ton of, it's this.

  • A ton. A very common term to mean 'a lot'.

  • It's interchangeable with 'tons'. It's a huge company, they have tons of employees.

  • Or, it's a huge company, they have a ton of employees.

  • A ton of. Tons of. You know what, I have my elbow on the table.

  • >> That's actually like... >> That's not okay.

  • Considered bad manners.

  • Especially when I'm trying to get out a huge plate of food.

  • Let me take it off.

  • Manners.

  • This is your way of being.

  • We usually use the adjectives 'good' and 'bad' with it.

  • As the parent of a young child, I'm definitely in the middle of trying to teach good manners.

  • Good manners at the table, like 'don't talk with your mouth full';

  • or good manners when meeting someone, like 'make eye contact.' Manners.

  • Well, first of all, the thing I love about YouTube is niches can flourish.

  • Niches can flourish. There are two different pronunciations that you'll hear for 'niche'.

  • It can be 'niche' or 'niche'. Both are in the dictionary, both are okay. A niche is a specialized segment.

  • So not general, something that applies to a lot of people, but niche. Something more narrow and focused.

  • For example, I don't teach English as a Second Language, I focus on the niche of pronunciation.

  • Well, first of all, the thing I love about YouTube is niches can flourish.

  • I also used the word 'flourish' there.