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  • {♫Intro♫}

  • Study after study has shown that napping is awesome

  • even for young, healthy adults who

  • get enough sleep at night.

  • On average, people feel better after catching

  • a few Zs, and their brains work better too.

  • Which might make you wonder:

  • should everyone be napping?

  • Well, not necessarily.

  • The answer is more complicated than you might think.

  • Lots of people swear by naps.

  • In the US, for example, about half of adults

  • nap in a given week.

  • And there's been a ton of research on napping

  • which suggests the benefits are impressive.

  • Post-nap, people do better on tests that measure

  • math skills, logic, reaction time, memory,

  • moodall kinds of things, really.

  • And on some tests, a nap

  • is even better than caffeine!

  • But such results are a bit biased,

  • because a lot of this work has been done in people

  • who are either sleep deprived or habitual nappers.

  • And studies suggest the gains for people

  • who nap regularly are so great that

  • even if a study includes non-nappers,

  • the nappers' benefits can skew the results

  • of the whole group!

  • Now, it makes sense that researchers have

  • relied so heavily on nappers

  • and people who are downright exhausted.

  • It's not exactly easy to fall asleep in the middle of the day

  • in a weird lab bedroom

  • with wires attached to you.

  • But, it also means we're only now starting

  • to figure out who benefits from napping and why.

  • And while naps are great on average,

  • not everyone benefits equally.

  • When researchers have taken pains to look

  • at a more representative sample, they've

  • been able to tease out some differences between

  • people who nap regularly and those who don't.

  • Non-nappers typically don't get a cognitive boost

  • from napping; lots of times, they just

  • wake up feeling groggy.

  • And it may be because there are differences

  • in what happens in their brains

  • when they nap.

  • Non-nappers spend more time in deeper sleep,

  • which could make it harder for them to wake up.

  • They also have fewer brain-wave signatures

  • of memory consolidationwhen new information

  • moves into long-term storage

  • which could explain why they don't perform better

  • on memory tests post-nap.

  • But what if non-nappers just need

  • more practice napping?

  • Researchers looked into that question

  • for a study published in 2018.

  • They put non-habitual nappers

  • on a training regimen to try to build their napping skills.

  • Basically, participants took a 20-minute nap,

  • 3 times a week.

  • And, after 4 weeks... it made zero difference.

  • They still had the same patterns of brainwaves

  • during a nap, they woke up feeling

  • just as groggy, and they did no better

  • on cognitive tests.

  • That could be because nap aversion is hard-wired.

  • There's some evidence that it may come down

  • to the gene variations that you're born with

  • and your childhood napping habits.

  • Non-nappers could just be people who have

  • learned through experience that napping doesn't

  • work for them.

  • Or, it could be that the participants simply didn't train long or hard enough.

  • But even if everyone could learn to

  • nap like the pros,

  • there are a few other caveats to consider

  • before we say they should.

  • For shift workers and people with sleep disorders

  • or atypical sleep schedules, things get even

  • more complicated.

  • And even though older adults

  • are more likely to take naps than younger folks,

  • napping in seniors is associated with higher rates

  • of some pretty nasty health outcomes.

  • There's no direct evidence that napping is causing these problems.

  • But we need more information about this connection

  • before we can say napping is great

  • for this group.

  • Still, if you are a younger, healthy adult who enjoys a good siesta,

  • you'll probably get a lot out of napping regularly.

  • And there's plenty of science

  • that can help you optimize your routine.

  • Research says the sweet spot for nap length

  • is somewhere around 10 to 30 minutes.

  • Anything shorter is not restful.

  • Much longer than that, and you'll wake up groggy.

  • And the best time of day to nap seems to be

  • sometime in the 2 to 5 PM window.

  • This could be because circadian rhythms naturally

  • dip in the afternoon

  • hence that mid-afternoon lull.

  • And that may make it easier to fall asleep,

  • which is definitely an important factor in

  • napping success.

  • But there's also evidence that late-day

  • naps interfere with nighttime sleep,

  • so it may just be that 2 to 5 is early enough

  • to avoid that.

  • So even if you usually avoid naps,

  • you could try following these best practices and see

  • if napping does anything for you.

  • But if it doesn't work out,

  • you don't need to feel bad.

  • Your brain might just work a little differently.

  • Thanks to Rox Manzi for asking,

  • and to all our other patrons who voted for this question

  • in our poll.

  • You can find out more about joining our Patreon community

  • at Patreon.com/SciShow.

  • And one more quick tip:

  • you might get the most benefits of all

  • if you combine your nap with caffeine.

  • We have a whole episode

  • that explains why and how to pull it off

  • so why not watch that one next!

  • {♫Outro♫}

{♫Intro♫}

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昼寝は素晴らしいです...しかし、それはすべての人のためですか? (Napping Is Awesome... but Is It for Everyone?)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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