Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • An enduring myth says we use

    不朽の神話によると、私たちは

  • only 10% of our brain.

    脳の10%しかない。

  • The other 90% standing idly by for spare capacity.

    残りの9割は予備のために待機しています。

  • Hucksters promised to unlock that hidden potential

    ハックスターはその隠された可能性を解き明かすことを約束した

  • with methods "based on neuroscience,"

    神経科学に基づいた方法で

  • but all they really unlock is your wallet.

    しかし、彼らが本当にロックを解除するのは、あなたの財布だけです。

  • Two thirds of the public

    国民の3分の2が

  • and nearly half of science teachers

    と理科の先生の半数近くが

  • mistakenly believe the 10% myth.

    10%神話を誤解している。

  • In the 1890s, William James,

    1890年代には、ウィリアム・ジェームズ

  • the father of American psychology,

    アメリカ心理学の父

  • said, "Most of us do not meet

    と言うと、「ほとんどの人は出会いがない

  • our mental potential."

    "私たちの精神的な可能性"

  • James meant this as a challenge,

    ジェームスはこれを課題としていた。

  • not an indictment of scant brain usage.

    乏しい脳みその使い方を非難するものではありません。

  • But the misunderstanding stuck.

    しかし、誤解は引っかかった。

  • Also, scientists couldn't figure out

    また、科学者たちは

  • for a long time

    長らく

  • the purpose of our massive frontal lobes

    膨大な前頭葉の目的

  • or broad areas of the parietal lobe.

    または頭頂葉の広い領域。

  • Damage didn't cause motor or sensory deficits,

    被害は運動器や感覚障害を起こさなかった。

  • so authorities concluded they didn't do anything.

    当局は何もしていないと判断した

  • For decades, these parts

    何十年もの間、これらの部品は

  • were called silent areas,

    はサイレントエリアと呼ばれていました。

  • their function elusive.

    その機能は捉えどころのないものです。

  • We've since learned that they underscore

    私たちはそれ以来、彼らが強調することを学んできました。

  • executive and integrative ability,

    エグゼクティブで統合的な能力。

  • without which, we would hardly be human.

    それがなければ人間とは言えない

  • They are crucial to abstract reasoning,

    抽象的な推論には欠かせないものです。

  • planning,

    計画を立てます。

  • weighing decisions

    秤量

  • and flexibly adapting to circumstances.

    と柔軟に状況に応じた対応ができるようになりました。

  • The idea that 9/10 of your brain

    脳の9/10という考えは

  • sits idly by in your skull

    髑髏の中で黙って見ている

  • looks silly when we calculate how the brain uses energy.

    脳がどのようにエネルギーを使うかを計算すると、バカみたいに見えます。

  • Rodent and canine brains consume

    げっ歯類とイヌの脳が消費する

  • 5% of total body energy.

    全身のエネルギーの5%。

  • Monkey brains use 10%.

    猿の脳みそは10%使う。

  • An adult human brain,

    大人の人間の脳。

  • which accounts for only 2% of the body's mass,

    体の2%しか占めていない。

  • consumes 20% of daily glucose burned.

    は、1日に消費されるブドウ糖の20%を消費します。

  • In children, that figure is 50%,

    子供の場合、その数字は50%です。

  • and in infants, 60%.

    と乳児では60%となっています。

  • This is far more than expected

    これは予想をはるかに超える

  • for their relative brain sizes,

    彼らの相対的な脳の大きさのために

  • which scale in proportion to body size.

    体の大きさに比例してスケールする。

  • Human ones weigh 1.5 kilograms,

    人間のものは1.5キログラム。

  • elephant brains 5 kg,

    象の脳みそ 5kg

  • and whale brains 9 kg,

    とクジラの脳みそ9kg。

  • yet on a per weight basis,

    しかし、重量ベースでは

  • humans pack in more neurons

    人間は神経細胞をより多く詰め込む

  • than any other species.

    他のどの種よりも

  • This dense packing is what makes us so smart.

    この濃密なパッキングが、私たちをスマートにしてくれるのです。

  • There is a trade-off between body size

    体の大きさとのトレードオフがある

  • and the number of neurons of primate,

    と霊長類の神経細胞の数を示しています。

  • including us, can sustain.

    私たちを含めて

  • A 25 kg ape has to eat 8 hours a day

    25kgの猿は1日8時間食べなければならない

  • to uphold a brain with 53 billion neurons.

    530億のニューロンを持つ脳を支えるために

  • The invention of cooking,

    料理の発明である。

  • one and half million years ago,

    150万年前のことです。

  • gave us a huge advantage.

    は、私たちに大きなアドバンテージを与えてくれました。

  • Cooked food is rendered soft and predigested

    調理された食品は軟らかくなり、捕食されます。

  • outside of the body.

    体の外側に

  • Our guts more easily absorb its energy.

    私たちの内臓は、そのエネルギーをより簡単に吸収します。

  • Cooking frees up time

    料理をすることで時間に余裕が生まれる

  • and provides more energy

    と、より多くのエネルギーを提供します。

  • than if we ate food stuffs raw

    生食よりも

  • and so we can sustain brains

    そうすれば脳を維持することができる

  • with 86 billion densely packed neurons.

    860億個の神経細胞が密集しています。

  • 40% more than the ape.

    猿より4割多い。

  • Here's how it works:

    その仕組みをご紹介します。

  • Half the calories a brain burns

    脳が消費するカロリーは半分

  • go towards simply keeping the structure intact

    躯体を守る

  • by pumping sodium and potassium ions

    ナトリウムとカリウムのイオンを汲み上げることで

  • across membranes to maintain an electrical charge.

    膜を横切って電荷を維持します。

  • To do this, the brain has to be an energy hog.

    そのためには、脳がエネルギーの塊にならないといけません。

  • It consumes an astounding 3.4 x 10^21 ATP molecules per minute,

    1分間に3.4×10^21という驚異的なATP分子を消費します。

  • ATP being the coal of the body's furnace.

    ATPは体の炉の石炭である。

  • The high cost of maintaining resting potentials

    安静時電位を維持するための高いコスト

  • in all 86 billion neurons

    八百六十億のニューロン全体で

  • means that little energy is left

    ということは、エネルギーがほとんど残っていないということです。

  • to propel signals down axons and across synapses,

    軸索を下ってシナプスを横切って信号を推進する。

  • the nerve discharges that actually get things done.

    実際に物事を成し遂げる神経の放電。

  • Even if only a tiny percentage of neurons

    ごく一部のニューロンであっても

  • fired in a given region at any one time,

    区域内で一度に発砲されたもの。

  • the energy burden of generating spikes

    スパイク発生時のエネルギー負担

  • over the entire brain

    全脳

  • would be unsustainable.

    は持続不可能だろう。

  • Here's where energy efficiency comes in.

    ここでエネルギー効率の出番です。

  • Letting just a small proportion of cells

    セルのわずかな割合で

  • signal at any one time,

    信号を一度に表示することができます。

  • known as sparse coding,

    スパースコーディングとして知られています。

  • uses the least energy,

    は最もエネルギーを使わない。

  • but carries the most information.

    が、最も多くの情報を運びます。

  • Because the small number of signals

    信号数が少ないので

  • have thousands of possible paths

    幾通りもの道がある

  • by which to distribute themselves.

    自分たちを流通させるために

  • A drawback of sparse coding

    疎な符号化の欠点

  • within a huge number of neurons

    膨大な数のニューロンの中で

  • is its cost.

    はそのコストです。

  • Worse, if a big proportion of cells never fire,

    さらに悪いことに、大きな割合の細胞が発火しない場合。

  • then they are superfluous

    然れば余計なお世話

  • and evolution should have jettisoned them long ago.

    進化はとっくの昔にそれらを捨てるべきだった。

  • The solution is to find

    を見つけるのが解決策です。

  • the optimum proportion of cells

    さいぼうりつ

  • that the brain can have active at once.

    脳が一度にアクティブになれること

  • For maximum efficiency,

    最大限の効率化のために

  • between 1% and 16% of cells

    細胞の1%から16%の間

  • should be active at any given moment.

    は、任意の瞬間にアクティブでなければなりません。

  • This is the energy limit

    これがエネルギーの限界

  • we have to live with

    生きていかなければならない

  • in order to be conscious at all.

    意識を全く持たないようにするために

  • The need to conserve resources

    資源を節約する必要性

  • is the reason most of the brain's operations

    は、脳の操作のほとんどが

  • must happen outside of conciousness.

    意識の外で起きなければなりません。

  • It's why multitasking is a fool's errand.

    これだからマルチタスクは馬鹿の役には立たない。

  • We simply lack the energy to do two things at once

    私たちは、二つのことを同時に行うためのエネルギーが不足しているだけです。

  • let alone three or five.

    三つや五つではなく

  • When we try, we do each task less well

    やろうとすると、それぞれの作業がうまくいかない

  • than if we had given it our full attention.

    私たちが細心の注意を払っていた場合よりも

  • The numbers are against us.

    数字は我々に不利なんだ

  • Your brain is already smart and powerful.

    あなたの脳はすでに賢くてパワフルです。

  • So powerful, that it needs a lot of power

    それほどまでに強力で、それには多くのパワーが必要です。

  • to stay powerful.

    力を維持するために。

  • And so smart

    そして、スマートに

  • that it has built in an energy efficiency plan.

    エネルギー効率化計画が組み込まれていること。

  • So don't let a fradulent myth

    だから、偽りのない神話を作るな

  • make you guilty about your

    後ろめたい気持ちにさせる

  • supposedly lazy brain.

    怠惰な脳みそのはずなのに

  • Guilt would be a waste of energy.

    罪悪感はエネルギーの無駄遣いになります。

  • After all this,

    これだけのことがあったのに

  • don't you realize it's dumb to waste

    無駄なことに気づかないのか

  • mental energy?

    精神的なエネルギー?

  • You have billions of

    あなたは何十億もの

  • power-hungry neurons to maintain.

    維持するために、パワーに飢えたニューロン

  • So hop to it!

    だから、それにホップしてください!

An enduring myth says we use

不朽の神話によると、私たちは

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B2 中上級 日本語 TED-Ed エネルギー ニューロン みそ 細胞 消費

TED-ED】あなたは脳の何%を使っていますか?- リチャード・E・サイトウイック

  • 9113 1082
    VoiceTube に公開 2014 年 03 月 26 日
動画の中の単語