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  • What's up, guys?

  • Far saying today we're gonna be talking about the open source computer science degree enough.

  • Felt like I spent like 1000 hours on this thing.

  • For the past week or two, I've been curating this list, figuring out what requirements need to be fulfilled for an undergraduate computer science degree.

  • I took my own personal experience with my degree program.

  • I looked at a bunch of different, you know, higher up Ivy League type school computer science degree programs in this open source computer science degree.

  • Our course is that will satisfy your computer science undergraduate requirements all except general education, cause we don't really care too much about our history.

  • But when it comes to the actual computer science aspect of things and what is required for the actual computer science degree, this is what I came up with.

  • So here we have the open source computer science degree, and I have a few different categories.

  • Within this.

  • I have a computer science basics.

  • I have programming.

  • I have math.

  • I have systems of theory.

  • I have applications and I've UNIX.

  • I did take a bit of help from a few sources.

  • I leave all of those sources down in the description below, because when I was doing so, my research I stumbled across some of some other people.

  • Or cos if you will, that did something similar to this.

  • But this is my take on it before we actually get into the de courses.

  • That list, of course, is let me explain the layout of what?

  • Of everything and kind of how I found the courses.

  • So I have found the courses I use Class Central.

  • So as you can see, we have a lot of different courses, depending on what you want to learn for us.

  • Obviously, it's computer science, and that is 1118 courses.

  • That's a lot.

  • That was a lot for me to go through and figure out what I found to be best for what we needed for the little degree that I put together over here.

  • But based on that requirement structure that I just mentioned, I used this to search and basically, you know, insurer to CS or something about machine learning and what have you and that this is the tool I used.

  • Oh, and one other thing.

  • I'm not sure if I mentioned this in the video yet it's kind of crucial.

  • The reason this is called the open source computer science degree because all of the classes are open source notice.

  • I use this tool, which is specifically labeled free online courses or computer science.

  • So all of these air free and what you'll notice is that all of the courses that I have chosen are available on Ed ex dot or GE udacity dot com and Corsair a dot or GE.

  • What you'll notice about course there is that there are payment options.

  • But what you're able to do is some courses you're able to access for free, just flat out and then other courses you're able to access via the audit system.

  • So instead of buying a whole entire program or structures something that consists of 456 courses, you can just ask for one course.

  • Audit the course and what Corsair essentially wants you to do what you ought.

  • It is to buy that whole entire certification or what have you but said you could just ordered it for free.

  • And that's what I would encourage you to dio, considering this is all about getting the knowledge of a computer science degree for free.

  • All right, so let's talk about how I set up all of this.

  • I realise into doing all this research would make much more sense as a blogger post.

  • And essentially, what I did is I read a I created a read me dime D over here on Get up, Push it up to my get hub.

  • I did mess up on a few formatting that I just noticed while recording like I didn't include This school's right here, but I'll get that updated for you guys.

  • I just want to explain essentially what I have going on here.

  • So we have a few different categories computer science, basics programming, math systems, theory applications and UNIX.

  • And within each category we have a table.

  • Now this table has a few different columns.

  • Courses, which is self explanatory, just kind of went over that school.

  • So although all of these are available in the coursera udacity and at X, what you'll notice is here This All the calculus courses are offered by M.

  • I T.

  • Udacity, although it doesn't listed here this particular courses offered by U V.

  • A and Corsaro.

  • This particular courses offered by Duke.

  • So these are essentially the platforms that these universities use to distribute these free courses.

  • And that's what I labeled here.

  • So you ve a U.

  • C.

  • San Diego, I tried to say, consistent with the programming aspect.

  • Duke, UW, University of Washington.

  • So on and so forth, duration and effort are essentially go together.

  • Duration is how long it should take you to complete each course based on the effort.

  • Put in so 2 to 5 hours a week, six weeks is how long it should take you to do this.

  • And then frequency now frequencies where it gets a little bit weird.

  • So as you'll see where we have self paced, which self pace is essentially, the information's out there.

  • There's no enrolled date.

  • You could just access it as you want whenever you want.

  • But when it comes to some of these other courses, they have once a month, twice a month every week.

  • And the reason I put it like that is because over here on the tool that I used when it comes to Ah, Class Central, let's Google in this.

  • For example, if we go over to the start date, I read it as all of these are the actual start dates, and it looks like this is about twice a month, essentially every other every two weeks, however, something that I did notice.

  • So this is a machine learning by Stanford.

  • Let's go to this class over here.

  • And as you can see, the start date is supposed to be 21st of January 2019.

  • However, today is January 18th.

  • Oh, never mind.

  • Looks like this one actually doesn't roll and starts January 21st.

  • So that's what I mean by doing it twice a month or once a month in the frequency category.

  • What I was trying to get it is that some of these courses on course there I feel like the enrolled date is whatever today's date is.

  • So some of these may be self paced.

  • They just don't say it.

  • They just have enroll starts in January 18th to get you to sign up today.

  • That's my assumption that I was trying to get at.

  • But obviously some of these do have real enroll dates.

  • Forget I said anything about frequency.

  • Frequency is whenever the courses offered self face all the time once a month, it's offered once a month, and then we have pre requisites.

  • So some of these, obviously, the computer science basics This is essentially insured a computer science method of thinking in computer science.

  • You don't really have prerequisites butt over here.

  • I kind of structure, especially within the programming or within the math and kind of give the prerequisite for each one.

  • Obviously, calculus one a one B one see each one previous iteration is going to be the prerequisite to the next.

  • And then the initial Perec is It will be an assumption that, you know, pre calculus, and then same goes for the programming section.

  • This comes after this.

  • Therefore, this is the prerequisite to that.

  • I think it's time to actually get down to the courses.

  • Remember, this will be available in my get hub for you to click on all of these courses.

  • Some of these our affiliate links like the Corsair ones, but you're not buying anything.

  • The only reason I included the Corsair a deal as affiliate links is because if you do end up buying something, then that helps support the channel.

  • But other than that, everything's free.

  • That's a disclaimer.

  • So let's start with computer science basics.

  • This is what you would want to take at the very beginning.

  • Before you take anything else, there are some like this.

  • Of course you could take with it, considering these aren't really prerequisites to that.

  • However, I would recommend taking insure to computer science.

  • I chose the UV A course.

  • There are plenty of other courses available out there that could replace this or that or this or that or this.

  • If you think you know a better course, put it down on description below or four condition depository on, Get up at it.

  • And then I'll see if I want to throw that in here is just This is what I found.

  • That's also another disclaimer.

  • So I would recommend taking the intro to Computer Science course first to see if you're actually interested in computer science.

  • There's no point in trying to set up a whole entire schedule for yourself, like, All right, I want to take this this, this and that for my first semester of school because I do recommend taking this as a scent like a real college course, and you wouldn't want to go through all of that scheduling if computer science isn't really your thing, so just take in short of computer science, you can also take mathematical thinking and computer science at the same time.

  • This is from what I can tell the decently easy course over there so that one you can take alongside your computer science now into programming.

  • So I have this set up.

  • Basically start at course, Number one and you go all the way through to course number six job programming.

  • Build a recommendation system, and it's essentially in order from 123456 that'll show over here in the pre records that structure.

  • And then what we have below is programming languages, part A, B and C.

  • So the first few that's all about Java programming, obviously all the courses air called Java programming.

  • The reason I chose Java one.

  • I really like Java, so maybe I'm a little bit biased.

  • But also, I was stuck to see that there six courses, all offered by Duke, available on course era where you're able to essentially have everything in chronological order.

  • All of these go together perfectly flush.

  • Java syntax is very similar to many other languages that you will be using throughout your computer science and sulfur engineering career.

  • And if you were to start off with something like Python, although yes, you will learn all of the programming semantics, everything that has to go with the programming side of things, the sin taxes a little bit more difficult to convert over to something like C++ or Swift or C Sharp for Java.

  • So that's why I chose Java for all of those reasons, and then down here, the programming languages, this essentially principles of programming.

  • So something that I took when I was in computer science was a course called Principles of Programming, where I learned three different computer languages.

  • So I learned Prologue POV, Ray in SML and J s smell Injun you'll probably never hear about, and the other two are used in very niche areas.

  • If it all, I don't know if any of any people use those professionally, I don't I've never used it since That course, the idea of principles of programming is too.

  • Learn how to learn new languages.

  • So that's why I touched on Java being able to translate into other languages.

  • The syntax that is, that's what these three courses all about.

  • You learn a new language in each and essentially, this course is all about learning how to learn new languages based on the information you've learned from all of this.

  • If that did make sense, leave a comment.

  • Now Explain it better.

  • So let's move on to math.

  • Math is something that a lot of people are scared off when it comes to computer science.

  • But something you have to remember is that computer science is indeed a science.

  • And what a science science is.

  • A lot of math.

  • Peter Science, the way I like to look at it is more of a math degree than it is an engineering degree.

  • It's essentially like a math degree in engineering degree.

  • Had a baby inside a computer.

  • Then you had computer science.

  • So the main math that you will learn with in computer science calculus, Lenny, algebra, probability and statistics starting off with calculus.

  • We have three courses here.

  • Follow courses all by M.

  • I T.

  • So it's very continuous and these three courses are going to be M.

  • I T courses.

  • So I would expect a bit of difficulty when jumping into that linear algebra foundations to frontiers, Lenny, algebra is huge, especially when you start to get into other aspects of computer science.

  • You're gonna use a lot of linear algebra in computer science.

  • You're essentially going to take Lenny out.

  • Jeroen, apply it to computer science.

  • That's a lot of what it is you're applying math with code into the computer with linear algebra, some calculus, a lot of data structures, discreet structures, that type of thing.

  • And then we have introductory to probability and data and then inter to statistics.

  • Now I try to find something that was more consolidated.

  • I think in all honesty, that introduction to probability in data by Duke would cover essentially what you need.

  • But I also found in sure just statistics.

  • And that may work as well.

  • In all honesty, I'm not sure.

  • Although these air from Duke and Stanford that these are exactly what I wanted.

  • I just couldn't find the exact like I took a probability and statistics course all in one, and that was a requirement that was like a two or 300 level course statistics category, and that was required for my C s degree.

  • And that's essentially why added thes two in there and then system systems Where gets where it gets fun.

  • The beginning of systems.

  • You may feel like I know all of this, you know, especially if you build a PC.

  • Remember, I built a PC right before my computer science degree, and I'm like, I got this like the first few classes were going over some of the hardware, kind of how it's connected.

  • No, this doesn't like all this is gonna be easy and in, like, the next week when I put my guard down and just came full force and plus it even like anything that's to do with all of the hardware.

  • It's kind of the intricacies of the hardware.

  • So build a modern computer from First Principles from Nan Tetris one, and to this from the Hebrew School of Jerusalem.

  • And this supposedly is very sought after course.

  • A lot of people tend to like it had very good reviews online.

  • That's why I included it.

  • Now, this isn't something that you wouldn't want to hop into your first semester.

  • I would recommend taking a your introduction to computer science or especially this first programming course, and then hop into this over here because then you have a better understanding of basic programming knowledge, which is your prerequisite and then introduction to operating systems.

  • Just think of this as a Maur emphasized and advanced version of what you're learning in here.

  • So it's more so operating systems.

  • But once you go through all of that, you understand, and then theory.

  • A big part of computer science is theory.

  • I essentially just incorporated a lot of algorithms theory machines into this theory category, all three of which are from Princeton.

  • I know it's not listed right here, but all three of these air from Princeton, and it's not necessarily supposed to be taken in this order.

  • There is another course that is supposed to be a prerequisite to this, or at least a first portion of it.

  • I'm not sure how much it applies from one to another, but there's another course that you're supposed to take alongside this, but it's not available just yet, but I think this one is a very good start.

  • You make sure your prerequisite is calculus one.

  • Not one A but calculus one.

  • All of them.

  • Do you want to make sure you take one a one B in one see, because it's algorithms.

  • Now you're gonna need to know math and calculus.

  • You're gonna be working with a lot of different type of math.

  • It's not necessarily that you're gonna be using calculus, innit?

  • But it'll if you can understand calculus.

  • You understand this?

  • That's what I'm trying to say.

  • And then you want to move on algorithms, Part one.

  • And then I agree with this part two now into applications.

  • So applications.

  • I'd like to think of it as what's applicable.

  • So sulfur engineering introduction I had to take.

  • Essentially, they introduce offer engineering it.

  • At least my class taught you bit about agile development, how to work with the team.

  • And a lot has to do with the actual cell for engineering aspect of thanks to kind of like real world knowledge.

  • And that's what I'm trying to try to find within this course.

  • Then singles for machine learning, where it's more applicable knowledge where before you're learning a lot of theory, a lot of basics Machine learning is very focused, offered by Stanford Database Management Essentials.

  • You're gonna work computer science, take a data base course.

  • There's some computer science degrees like mine that didn't require database course, but I took one.

  • Anyway, I'm so glad I did, because you're gonna be working with databases, essentially, no matter what, unless you're doing some.

  • If you're in computer science, you're gonna be working databases.

  • Nika ta gra fi.

  • So, photography, That's, you know, fun little code, the cipher, codes and stuff like that, but on a grander scale and then UNIX UNIX is very basic work.

  • That's why the prerequisites are none.

  • And these air to that.

  • I found that I tend to like and this is the only one that's not offered by a Universities are by udacity, but it's only one week, five hours, I believe Lynch command line basics.

  • You're gonna be working with all of this.

  • You should probably take both of these.

  • You want to learn Lennox UNIX, that type of stuff, which you will need to know in order to navigate through all of your directories and from one server to another.

  • And it's essentially what you live on your your console, Lennox console.

  • So definitely take those.

  • That's the end of my open source computer science degree.

  • Like I said, if you have any recommendations on what maybe someone should take instead of this introduce computer science course.

  • Let me know, to be honest with you, I don't know how many of you all made it to the end of this video.

  • I'm sure plenty of geologists went ahead in the description and clicked on the gate held link or the medium link.

  • If I do decide to post this on a medium blawg post But if you did stick around, I appreciate it.

  • We should have, like, the video.

  • This is probably the most time I spent working on a video beforehand, like prepping for the video.