Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • (Music)

    音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (

  • One of the great things about science

    科学の素晴らしいところの一つ

  • is that when scientists make a discovery,

    とは、科学者が発見をした時のことです。

  • it's not always in a prescribed manner,

    それはいつも決まった方法ではありません。

  • as in, only in a laboratory under strict settings,

    のように、厳格な設定の下での実験室でのみ。

  • with white lab coats and all sorts of neat science gizmos

    白衣に白衣、そして科学のギズモの数々。

  • that go, "Beep!"

    その行く、"ビープ!&quot。

  • In reality,

    現実には

  • the events and people involved in some of the major scientific discoveries

    主要な科学的発見の出来事と関係者

  • are as weird and varied as they get.

    は、それと同じくらい奇妙で多様性に富んでいます。

  • My case in point:

    私の場合は

  • The Weird History of the Cell Theory.

    細胞論の奇妙な歴史。

  • There are three parts to the cell theory.

    細胞論には3つの部分があります。

  • One: All organisms are composed of one or more cells.

    1:すべての生物は、1つ以上の細胞で構成されています。

  • Two: The cell is the basic unit of structure and organization in organisms.

    2:細胞は生物の構造と組織の基本単位である。

  • And three: All cells come from preexisting cells.

    そして3つ目はすべての細胞は、既存の細胞から生まれます。

  • To be honest, this all sounds incredibly boring

    正直言って、すべてが信じられないほど退屈に聞こえる。

  • until you dig a little deeper into how the world of microscopic organisms

    ミクロの世界がどうなっているのか、もう少し掘り下げてみるまでは

  • and this theory came to be.

    と、この説が出てきました。

  • It all started in the early 1600s,

    すべては1600年代初頭に始まった。

  • in the Netherlands, where a spectacle maker

    オランダのメガネ屋さん

  • name Zacharias Jansen is said to have come up with the first compound microscope,

    ザカリアス・ヤンセンという名前は、最初の複合顕微鏡を思いついたと言われています。

  • along with the first telescope.

    最初の望遠鏡と一緒に

  • Both claims are often disputed,

    両者の主張はしばしば争われています。

  • as apparently he wasn't the only bored guy with a ton of glass lenses to play with at the time.

    どうやら彼だけではなかったようですが、当時はガラスレンズをたくさん持っていて退屈していたようです。

  • Despite this,

    にもかかわらず

  • the microscope soon became a hot item

    顕微鏡はすぐに話題になった

  • that every naturalist or scientist at the time wanted to play with,

    当時のナチュラリストや科学者なら誰もが遊んでみたいと思っていたこと。

  • making it much like the iPad of its day.

    その日のiPadのような感じにしています。

  • One such person

    そのような方が一人

  • was a fellow Dutchman by the name of Anton van Leeuwenhoek,

    は、アントン・ファン・リューウェンフックという名前のオランダ人の仲間でした。

  • who heard about these microscope doohickies,

    この顕微鏡ドゥーヒッキーを聞いた人は

  • and instead of going out and buying one,

    と、買いに行くのではなく

  • he decided to make his own.

    自分で作ることにしたそうです。

  • And it was a strange little contraption indeed,

    そして、それは確かに奇妙な小さな仕掛けだった。

  • as it looked more like a tiny paddle the size of a sunglass lens.

    それはよりサングラスレンズのサイズの小さなパドルのように見えました。

  • If he had stuck two together, it probably would have made a wicked set of sunglasses ...

    彼は一緒に2つを貼り付けていた場合、それはおそらくサングラスの邪悪なセットを作っていただろう...

  • that you couldn't see much out of.

    周りが見えなくなってしまった

  • Any-who, once Leeuwenhoek had his microscope ready,

    ライオンアングルが顕微鏡の準備をしたら

  • he went to town, looking at anything and everything he could with them,

    彼は街に出て、彼らと一緒に何でもかんでも見ていました。

  • including the gunk on his teeth.

    歯の汚れも含めて

  • Yes, you heard right.

    はい、聞いていた通りです。

  • He actually discovered bacteria by looking at dental scrapings,

    実際に歯の削りカスを見て細菌を発見したそうです。

  • which, when you keep in mind that people didn't brush their teeth much,

    それは、あなたが人々があまり歯を磨いていなかったことを念頭に置いているとき。

  • if at all, back then,

    その時には

  • he must have had a lovely bunch of bacteria to look at.

    見た目にも可愛らしい細菌の束を持っていたに違いない。

  • When he wrote about his discovery,

    彼が発見したことを書いたとき

  • he didn't call them bacteria, as we know them today.

    彼は、今日のようにバクテリアとは呼ばなかった。

  • But he called them animalcules,

    しかし、彼は彼らをアニマルキュールと呼んでいました。

  • because they looked like little animals to him.

    彼には小動物にしか見えなかったからだ

  • While Leeuwenhoek was staring at his teeth gunk,

    ロウエンホークが歯のガクを見つめている間に

  • he was also sending letters to a scientific colleague in England,

    彼はイギリスの科学者の同僚にも手紙を送っていた。

  • by the name of Robert Hooke.

    ロバート・フックの名前で

  • Hooke was a guy who really loved all aspects of science,

    フックは科学のあらゆる面が本当に大好きな人でした。

  • so he dabbled in a little bit of everything, including physics, chemistry and biology.

    物理学、化学、生物学などを少しずつ勉強していました。

  • Thus it is Hooke who we can thank for the term "the cell,"

    したがって、それは我々が用語"細胞、&quotのために感謝することができるフックです。

  • as he was looking at a piece of cork under his microscope,

    顕微鏡でコルクのかけらを見ていると

  • and the little chambers he saw reminded him of cells,

    彼が見た小さな部屋は 独房を思い出させた

  • or the rooms monks slept in in their monasteries.

    僧侶が修道院で寝泊まりしていた部屋のことです。

  • Think college dorm rooms, but without the TV's, computers and really annoying roommates.

    大学の寮の部屋を考えてみてください、しかし、テレビ、コンピュータ、本当に迷惑なルームメイトはありません。

  • Hooke was something of an under-appreciated scientist of his day,

    フックは、彼の時代の科学者として過小評価されていたようなものだった。

  • something he brought upon himself,

    彼は自分のせいだと思っていた

  • as he made the mistake of locking horns with one of the most famous scientists ever,

    彼は最も有名な科学者の一人と角を結ぶというミスを犯しました。

  • Sir Isaac Newton.

    アイザック・ニュートン卿

  • Remember when I said Hooke dabbled in many different fields?

    フックが様々な分野に手を出したと言ったのを覚えているか?

  • Well, after Newton published a groundbreaking book

    ニュートンが画期的な本を出した後に

  • on how planets move due to gravity,

    重力によって惑星がどのように動くかについて

  • Hooke made the claim that Newton

    フックは、ニュートンが

  • had been inspired by Hooke's work in physics.

    は、フックの物理学の仕事に触発されていました。

  • Newton, to say the least, did not like that,

    ニュートンは、控えめに言っても、それが気に入らなかった。

  • which sparked a tense relationship between the two that lasted even after Hooke died,

    フックが死んだ後も続いた二人の緊張した関係に火をつけた。

  • as quite a bit of Hooke's research,

    フックの研究のかなりの部分として。

  • as well as his only portrait, was "misplaced," due to Newton.

    また、彼の唯一の肖像画だけでなく、"misplaced, " due to Newton.

  • Much of it was rediscovered, thankfully, after Newton's time,

    その多くはニュートンの時代の後に再発見されました。

  • but not his portrait, as sadly no one knows what Robert Hooke looked like.

    しかし、彼の肖像画ではなく、悲しいことに誰もロバート・フックがどのような姿をしていたか知らないので、彼の肖像画ではありません。

  • Fast-forward to the 1800s,

    1800年代に早送りして

  • where two German scientists discovered something that today we might find rather obvious,

    2人のドイツ人科学者が発見した場所で、今日私たちが発見したことは、かなり明白なことかもしれません。

  • but helped tie together what we now know as the cell theory.

    しかし、私たちが今、細胞理論として知っているものを結びつけるのに役立ちました。

  • The first scientist was Matthias Schleiden,

    最初の科学者はマティアス・シュライデン。

  • a botanist who liked to study plants under a microscope.

    顕微鏡で植物を研究するのが好きな植物学者。

  • From his years of studying different plant species,

    様々な植物を研究してきた彼の長年の経験から

  • it finally dawned on him that every single plant he had looked at

    彼が見てきた植物のすべてが

  • were all made of cells.

    はすべて細胞でできていました。

  • At the same time, on the other end of Germany,

    同時に、ドイツのもう一方の端っこ。

  • was Theodor Schwann,

    テオドール・シュワンが

  • a scientist who not only studied slides of animal cells under the microscope,

    動物細胞のスライドを顕微鏡で研究するだけではない科学者。

  • and got a special type of nerve cell named after him,

    彼の名を冠した特別な神経細胞を手に入れた。

  • but also invented rebreathers for firefighters

    消防士のための再呼吸器も発明した

  • and had a kickin' pair of sideburns.

    そして、キックキンのひげを生やしていました。

  • After studying animal cells for a while,

    しばらく動物の細胞を研究した後

  • he too came to the conclusion that all animals were made of cells.

    彼もまた、すべての動物は細胞でできているという結論に達しました。

  • Immediately, he reached out via snail mail,

    すぐに、カタツムリメールで連絡してきました。

  • as Twitter had yet to be invented,

    ツイッターがまだ発明されていなかったので

  • to other scientists working in the same field,

    同じ分野で働いている他の科学者に

  • met with Schleiden, who got back to him, and the two started working on the beginnings of the cell theory.

    シュライデンと出会い、彼のもとに戻ってきた二人は、細胞論の始まりに取り組み始めました。

  • A bone of contention arose between them

    二人の間に争いの種が生まれた

  • as for the last part of the cell theory,

    細胞論の最後の部分については

  • that cells come from preexisting cells.

    細胞は既存の細胞から生まれるという

  • Schleiden didn't exactly subscribe to that thought,

    シュライデンはそのような考えに同意していませんでした。

  • as he swore cells came from free cell formation,

    彼は細胞が自由細胞の形成から来たと 誓ったように

  • where they just kind of spontaneously crystalized into existence.

    自然発生的に結晶化したんだ

  • That's when another scientist, named Rudolph Virchow,

    それは、ルドルフ・ヴィルチョーという別の科学者の時です。

  • stepped in with research showing that cells did come from other cells,

    細胞が他の細胞から来たことを示す研究に踏み込んできました。

  • research that was actually -- hmm, how to put it? -- borrowed without permission

    実際にあった研究は...うーん、どう言えばいいのかな?-- 許可なく借りてきた

  • from a Jewish scientist by the name of Robert Remak,

    ロバート・リマクという名のユダヤ人科学者から

  • which led to two more feuding scientists.

    その結果、2人の科学者がさらに反目することになりました。

  • Thus, from teeth gunk to torquing off Newton,

    このように、歯ぎしりからニュートンのトルクオフまで。

  • crystallization to Schwann cells,

    シュワン細胞への結晶化。

  • the cell theory came to be an important part of biology today.

    細胞論は今日の生物学の重要な部分を占めるようになりました。

  • Some things we know about science today may seem boring,

    現代の科学について知っていることの中には、つまらないと思われるものもあるかもしれません。

  • but how we came to know them is incredibly fascinating.

    しかし、どのようにして彼らを知るようになったのかは、信じられないほど魅力的です。

  • So if something bores you,

    だから、何かがあなたを退屈にさせるなら

  • dig deeper.

    深く掘り下げて

  • It's probably got a really weird story behind it somewhere.

    きっとどこかに変な話が隠されているのでしょうね。

(Music)

音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 TED-Ed 音楽 細胞 フック 顕微 ニュートン

TED-ED】細胞論の奇想天外な歴史 - ローレン・ロイヤル・ウッズ

  • 209 23
    Why Why に公開 2020 年 08 月 06 日
動画の中の単語