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  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English, Huh?

  • I'm Dan, and joining me today is Catherine.

  • Hi, Catherine.

  • Hello, Don.

  • Hello, everyone.

  • So what's the story?

  • Well, today's story is about an incredible achievement.

  • Oh, I can't wait to hear it.

  • Okay, let's hear more from this BBC World Service News Bulletin.

  • An American swimmer has become the first person to cross the channel between France and England, a record four times non stop.

  • Sarah Thomas, who's 37 recently had cancer treatment, took 54 hours to finish her epic swim of about 200 kilometers.

  • She told the BBC it was extremely tough with the current pushing her off course, and she'd been stung by a jellyfish.

  • She said the moment she finished was quite surreal.

  • So the English Channel is the body of water is the sea between England and France.

  • Now people swim this fairly regularly, but the woman called Sarah Thomas has crossed this body of water four times, backwards and forwards without stop stopping.

  • Gosh, it's amazing Though she's 37 years old, she's recently hard treatment for cancer.

  • She actually swam about 100 and 20 mayors, which is longer than the distance that you travel four times.

  • Because the sea, the current, the movement of the sea kept pushing her away from her course, and she had to swim back.

  • She also got stung by a jellyfish on it took about 54 hours.

  • It's an amazing achievement, which she said, she said.

  • At the end.

  • It was quite kind of weird and surreal that you actually managed to dio can't even imagine how that Westfield It's incredible.

  • Good for her.

  • Okay, well, we've got three words and expressions that our viewers can use to talk about this incredible event.

  • What have we got?

  • We've got non stop feet and triumph.

  • Non stop feet and triumph.

  • Okay.

  • Can we have our first headline then, please?

  • We can.

  • We're looking at BBC News.

  • Sarah Thomas Woman first to swim channel four times.

  • Non stop.

  • Non stop without stopping.

  • Now there's a hyphen, their little line in between this the two bits of this word to parts of the word those Parthenon n o N than a little line joining them when you see them written down.

  • Second part is stop S T.

  • O P.

  • It's a two part word.

  • We join words sometimes with hyphens in English.

  • And this is one of them.

  • So what kind of wood is it?

  • Well, it's an objective.

  • We can talk about non stop work, OK?

  • Oi!

  • It could be an adverb.

  • You can work non stop.

  • So abject civil, right, Ferb?

  • Well, either one sounds exhausting to me.

  • Any other examples?

  • Well, as part off, if you do something non stop, it means without interruption without stopping so the phone can ring on.

  • Stop exhausting.

  • People can talk nonstop.

  • You can cry nonstop after something terrible happens.

  • Breaker?

  • Yep.

  • So lots of things can happen.

  • And the idea is that normally there would be a break or some kind of stop or pause.

  • But you used the wood nonstop.

  • Thio emphasize that this is continuous.

  • Okay, kind of emphasis, then.

  • Yeah, we can We can use this in relation to travel as well.

  • Come with you.

  • Can't even get a non stop flight somewhere is your flight.

  • If you all you can get a non stop bus and it means a transport that goes from point A to point B without stopping either for a break or to pick up more passengers or transfer.

  • Maybe transfer.

  • Yes.

  • So a nonstop flight is a flight that doesn't stop anywhere.

  • And can we use this in a negative way?

  • It'll well, we can, you know, nonstop.

  • The idea of it being something should stop, but it doesn't.

  • So if you work nonstop usually means you do over doing it.

  • If you can talk about nonstop criticism, you can talk about nonstop abuse, things that should stop.

  • But don't Well, thank you very much for that non stop explanation of non stop, but we have to stop.

  • Now.

  • Let's go up to our next headline.

  • All right, so now we're going to look at Health Post.

  • Sarah Thomas becomes first person to swim across the channel four times nonstop in 54 our feet feet achievement that requires great skill feet, foot toes, the things at the end of my legs, anything no doubt swimming feet up.

  • Yoko Ono, D'oh, d'oh d'oh!

  • And the spelling is different is where the spelling of this feat is.

  • F E a T.

  • It's a singular loan known, Um, and it isn't a feat is an achievement that requires great skill.

  • May be a lot of preparation.

  • It's something that is Mort is not an ordinary achievement.

  • Okay, so this feets is something that doesn't happen very often.

  • Not many people can do it.

  • If it does happen.

  • Everybody's going like, Wow.

  • So it's in a wow factor in the world.

  • Feet a little bit like those.

  • Ah, those boys who were trapped in the caves now in Thailand.

  • Was it last year?

  • Yeah.

  • Or even the year before.

  • The Tai Cave rescue was an amazing feat.

  • It was something that they didn't know how they were going to do it.

  • They didn't know if it would be successful.

  • Touching go.

  • There was It was so dangerous.

  • Yes, everybody run.

  • The world was watching When they got all those boys out safely.

  • Everybody was amazed.

  • It was an incredible feat.

  • Nice.

  • Yeah.

  • So what kind of verbs do we use this word?

  • Well, you can perform a feat.

  • You can achieve a feat, but we have to just use it with the verb to be something is all watts or will be a feat.

  • I think what you use more with the word feet is the objectives and incredible feat.

  • An amazing feat, an unbelievable feat.

  • You'll often hear feet with an extreme objective, amazing, unbelievable, impossible, incredible.

  • So I could say the Tai Cave Rescue Waas an incredible feat off human cooperation.

  • You could, and that's another really interesting thing about the word feet.

  • Something can be a feet off something and that something will be announced like a feat of endurance.

  • When something takes a long time like this woman swimming the channel, it can be a feet off cooperation that you said, if we a feat of engineering, if something is amazing in terms of its building and structure, like the the Big the Burj Khalifa, the Bird, the Bird Khalifa, in the United Arab Emirates is an amazing feat of engineering.

  • There's nothing like it in the world.

  • It's just incredible, Okay, but I've got another one for you because I have heard people say it was no mean feat.

  • No mean feat actually means it's an amazing feat, huh?

  • If something is no mean, it's kind of has an opposite effect, it means actually is amazing.

  • So you can say the Burj Khalifa is an amazing feat of engineering.

  • You can say it's no mean feat.

  • We kind of use no mean feat in in a very personal way as well.

  • So you can write 15 scripts and our last no mean feat.

  • That was no mate.

  • Yeah, when you say, how was it done?

  • I go.

  • What?

  • That was no mean.

  • That was no mean feat to Yes, well, it was no mean feat to explain that to us, Katharine.

  • So thank you very much.

  • Very well, Let's move on to our third and final headline.

  • But before we do, if you enjoy hearing about incredible feats of human achievement Well, lingo Hack has tons of stories all about just that.

  • Isn't that right, Kathryn?

  • We've got incredible feats on lingo how you can find out all about the Asian Iceman.

  • You can find out about people on the morn.

  • All you have to do is click the link and say some incredible feats on lingo.

  • AC lovely.

  • Let's go on to our third and final headline, then please.

  • Okay, I'm looking at the sun.

  • It's a try of American woman Sarah Thomas, 37 becomes first person to swim English channel four times nonstop in 54 hour marathon triumph.

  • Significant success.

  • Now this is correct me if I'm wrong.

  • This is about Roman's, isn't this?

  • Comes from Roman times.

  • It does come from Roman times.

  • So the word is triumph.

  • T r I u M p h A triumph in the days of the Roman Empire was a victory parade and entry to Rome from a successful army, an army that was allowed to do this.

  • Eso triumph means great success.

  • Nothing to do with military these days.

  • But yes, if the noun adjective form is triumphant.

  • So this woman was triumphant in her in her channel swim.

  • So this was a triumph for Sarah.

  • Triumph Acerra.

  • Yes, and it was a triumph over extreme conditions and that we can have fourth when it's a person over.

  • When you're saying what you were fighting in order to be triumphant, you mentioned that she was a cancer survivor.

  • She was boys, so technically then it would be she has.

  • She has had a triumph over cancer.

  • She's had a triumph over cancer.

  • She's triumphed over cancer.

  • Yes, so she's a very triumphant person, certainly in many ways and correct me if I'm wrong, but we can also, if we go back to the Burj Khalifa the building, can't we use triumph in connection with that as well?

  • You can.

  • You can say something is a triumph off something else and that something else is unknown.

  • So in the Burj Khalifa, it's a triumph off engineering.

  • 75 Summers is saying it's amazing feat of engineering.

  • It's about success.

  • It's about things.

  • Not be nothing else being similar as good.

  • Yes.

  • Now could you recap the vocabulary, please?

  • We had nonstop without stopping feet.

  • Achievement that requires great skill, triumph, significant success.

  • Thank you very much.

  • Now, if you'd like to test yourself on today's vocabulary, there is a quiz that you can take on our website that BBC learning english dot com.

  • I'm sure you'll be triumphant if you paid attention.

  • Don't forget that we are all over social media, too.

  • So Facebook, Twitter, instagram and YouTube and of course, you can download our app.

  • It's free to download and free to use so that you can take us with you wherever you go and learn English with us.

  • Non stop.

  • Thank you very much for joining us and We'll see you next time.

  • Bye bye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

  • Hi, everybody.

  • It's Neil for BBC Learning English.

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he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English, Huh?

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がんサバイバーのサラ・トーマス、英仏海峡をノンストップで4回泳ぐ - ニュースレビュー (Cancer survivor Sarah Thomas swims the English Channel four times non-stop - News Review)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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