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  • I was I was out to dinner with a friend of mine.

  • Um, and we're having a conversation about him becoming a manager in my current group.

  • And, um and he was you know, dude, I just totally don't want to do it like I'm not gonna be doing anything.

  • I'm just gonna be like a manager from now on.

  • Uh, it was one of those moments where you blurt something out.

  • You didn't realize you thought it until you said it on.

  • Guy said out loud without consciously thinking about I said, I said, Come on, man, Like this is an amazing opportunity.

  • It's your job to protect this incredibly fragile bacteriological colony inside this body called intel.

  • And if you let until have its way with it, intel will kill it.

  • But But if you don't, then just like in a human body, you know, the flora and fauna and our gut right, it benefits the body, right?

  • It works out well.

  • And I realized at that moment that that was sort of how I think about building these things.

  • So plucky rebels being agile in an unnatural place.

  • What is pluckiness?

  • Eso?

  • Flakiness is a combination of determination, but it is not grim.

  • Nobody wants to follow the guy who says, Let's all die going up that hill, right?

  • It is also cheerful, but nobody wants to follow somebody who is purely cheerful because purely cheerful is Well, well, I don't really care.

  • I'm not gonna keep trying.

  • So pluckiness is a combination of cheerful and determined.

  • Why rebels?

  • Well, um, if Intel already knew how to do the thing that you're thinking about trying to do inside Intel than Intel would have a p n l.

  • And there'd be a Z B B, an appeal war, and you'd be on a road map and you wouldn't be a start up.

  • It'd be a multibillion dollar business and like, that's not a start up.

  • So, um, a little bit of insurrection is good for the soul.

  • Uh, so that's why rebels and another point, how much agile is the right amount on?

  • They're probably people in this room know more about agile than I do.

  • I am, you know, scrums and sprints.

  • And, um, the right amount of agile is right up to the body, rejecting the bacteria everything up until there is.

  • You want as much as you can possibly make fit, but you need a veneer.

  • You need a veneer of predictability until is gonna want to see quarterly things.

  • Maybe you're gonna have to have finance help you do an NPV.

  • So how do you do this?

  • Rule number one Be right about the future.

  • How can you be right about the future?

  • The best way to do that is to create the future.

  • Because if you create it, can you get it right?

  • Um, I've gotten this wrong in my career.

  • In the mid nineties, I was working in the Windows Operating system group, and it was my responsibility to figure out what the right strategy was for CDR.

  • Anybody remembers recordable, right?

  • One CD media, Uh, and we were thinking, should we put this in the Windows operating system or not?

  • And we thought, Oh, yeah, the general consensus was users don't understand, right?

  • Once the operating system can't do right, once we're gonna exhaust the media.

  • If we do backups to the auto saves and word documents, all they're not gonna work.

  • So the net result of that was we chose not to make a future in which you could easily manage rewriteable or right ones, media.

  • And if anybody remembers how much of a pain it was in 2000 5 years after we ran into this problem toe actually put anything on a CD?

  • It's because in 1995 we didn't decide to make a future in which it would be easy.

  • In 2000 I will take credit for having screwed that up.

  • Um, I've gotten this right in my career.

  • I'll talk about bit locker in a second, But even if you're wrong, deciding you're gonna make a future can actually create profound impact.

  • There was a guy named Jack.

  • He was writing software toe help.

  • People type in messages on a computer in order to send an SMS message to a taxicab to do a dispatch system in New York City.

  • The contract failed.

  • The technology couldn't ship.

  • Have you ever used Twitter because that was Twitter?

  • So even if you're wrong about the future you're creating, if you've got forward momentum, that can really help.

  • So that's sort of this notion of leading from the front.

  • Keep it secret.

  • Keep it safe from Gandalf, one of my favorite Wiseman.

  • There are lots of people inside large companies who want to help you.

  • They're very well, meaning their heart is in the right place.

  • It is just that some kinds of help with the kinds of help we all could do without, they're gonna want you to give them a 10 year NPV.

  • They're gonna want to show a 31% return on the investment from start to finish.

  • They're gonna want you to be able to explain exactly what it is that you're gonna be doing to take advantage of a hardware feature that doesn't ship for two years.

  • Um, don't be afraid to go dark for a while when you're doing a start up your super proud.

  • And this is one difference between doing a start up in a big company and a small company, and I've done both.

  • When you're in a small company, you're starved for attention.

  • You will tell absolutely anybody about what you're doing in a big company.

  • There's a lot to be said for going dark until you have something to show.

  • We had this philosophy.

  • Shipping software beats power point.

  • Don't explain what is going to do as soon as you come out of being dark handed to someone, then you don't have to explain what it's gonna do.

  • They can hold it.

  • They can see it.

  • They can feel it.

  • They interact with it.

  • They know what it does.

  • They may ask, Why did you build this?

  • You say, Well, you know, because it's really awesome.

  • Um, but but modern software is all about people wanting a return right here.

  • Right now.

  • That's one of the things that service is a really profoundly changing the way we do software.

  • So, um, keep it secret, keep it safe, and then when it's time to talk about it, have something to show.

  • Don't don't rely on power point to tell your story.

  • Ah, always cheat.

  • Always win another wise man, Clint Smith.

  • But Peter, it says, right here on my badge.

  • You know, Intel, Code of conduct.

  • That's dishonorable cheating.

  • It's your job.

  • Is the leader of a start up in a big company or a small company Thio To make things unfair on behalf of your people, it is your job to optimize the system so that you get greater returns than everybody else.

  • That's your job.

  • So a little bit of optimizing is a very Good thing.

  • Um, this is kind of like the bacteria analogy again, right?

  • You you you want you want, you gotta carve out enough space for that bacteria to actually do its job.

  • Digest food, right?

  • If the bacteria is gone, you can't digest it anymore.

  • But if it's too successful in it exist the body and comes back in somewhere else, it kills you.

  • So you want to You want to contain that, But at the same time, let it do its job.

  • Um, we do this one cheating thing we do.

  • We like to make up names so people can assume they know what you're doing when you say cloud service is.

  • But if you say affiliated service's, they have absolutely no idea what you're talking about, which means you get to explain it.

  • And it means that especially in a large company, you're not inheriting the debt of defying term when you try to talk about it because people are, like, totally no cloud services are.

  • We tried those three years ago.

  • Don't you remember?

  • Insert name here.

  • Name here.

  • Right.

  • Um, well, but these air affiliated service's they're totally different.

  • It's cheating.

  • They're exactly the same but But it's very effective, so I recommend that.

  • So you do this to help you on Dhe.

  • This is my number one rule.

  • If you forget everything else about anything I've said, find some users and make them happy.

  • There will be projects in the future where you see the most profoundly awesome graph that says, If we do these 19 things, we will have a $1.7 billion business in the next five years.

  • You can always do that right.

  • There's always a way to to take data and help support a business unless it's truly, catastrophically bad, in which case I shouldn't.

  • But if you have people who are happy with what you've done, if you have found some users and you have made them happy, you have got a superpower, right?

  • I mean, you have something now where you could be like Bob.

  • Bob likes it.

  • Bob wants more.

  • Bob told me he wants the next 19 features.

  • Yeah, but you know, but Bob wants 19 more features like it becomes this incredibly compelling conversation.

  • If you have some users and you've made them happy and just the act of going out and finding people in deciding.

  • I want to make some people happy today.

  • First of all, it's kind of nice from a societal perspective, but also it's a you're going straight to the solving the problem and, um uh, an example bit locker in tooth.

  • Roughly 2001.

  • I was having a conversation with a security officer from a bank, and he said, We lose on average, one laptop in a New York City taxicab every day.

  • While later I'd like to say it was like pitching like this lightning bolt, right?

  • Oh, inspiration, Genius.

  • Probably like a year later, it suddenly dawned on me.

  • There is an entire office in that company and they're an only job is to deal with the misery of a loss laptop in New York City.

  • That's all they dio.

  • Nobody ever told me that.

  • But you have to have those people there.

  • Have to be.

  • People are like, Okay, let me get this straight.

  • It was the e V p of mergers and acquisitions.

  • Was was the hard driving scripted like where did go?

  • I mean, it's two o'clock in the morning.

  • Do we have to call the Wall Street Journal?

  • Do we need to get the analysts in, You know it's a nightmare.

  • So we decided, Let's build a product that is exclusively dedicated to making those people happy.

  • We're gonna build a product that makes risk managers and incident Response Team's inside large corporations happier about having to deal with lost in solar laptops.

  • The product of that was bit locker last.

  • I knew it was over half $1,000,000,000 revenue line, but it was exclusive like we did not think about I t workers.

  • We did not sit.

  • Think about the I t department.

  • Like we just said, All we want to do is say that those people go from from seven hours of sleep a night to eight hours of sleep and were successful on git was a huge, uh, success for my perspective, so make an attractive corpse.

  • All right, so we're planning to fail.

  • No, we're not planning to fail.

  • You should never plan to fail.

  • But here's the thing.

  • Projects get canceled, the world changes.

  • Cos change.

  • This happens in big companies.

  • This happens in small companies.

  • Um, you never know when the music is going to stop.

  • So this is a thing that agile can really help with because the cadence of agile in the agile process delivers more frequent leases of smaller things that s'more little victories.

  • Uh, the more little victories you could have, the more likely it is that if you do, God forbid, wind up being a corpse.

  • You are an attractive corpse because you have given the people who were with you on this journey a better resume, an opportunity for the next job.

  • Ah, thing they can hold.