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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • From the end zone to the locker room,

  • he pushes you to be your best.

  • Be perfect.

  • It's not about that scoreboard out there.

  • He shows you how to dig deep and beat the odds.

  • We shut them down because we can.

  • He's a leader who takes his team to the limit

  • and to victory.

  • [LAUGHTER, CHEERING]

  • [WHISTLE BLOWS]

  • Hey, women coach, too.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Here we go.

  • Hey.

  • They call me Hutch.

  • They don't call me Coach Hutch,

  • they just call me Hutch

  • I'm Meredith.

  • I was a Division I soccer player,

  • and I have 20 years of coaching experience

  • across all different levels.

  • I'm Coach Eddy, and I'm the only woman coaching

  • Division I men's basketball.

  • College sports is a $14 billion

  • industry with only a handful of female head coaches, who

  • are basically like C.E.O.'s running their teams.

  • In men's sports, only 3% of head coaches are women.

  • But even in women's sports, we only coach 42% of the teams.

  • Across all the Division I sports,

  • only one in four head coaches are women.

  • It's time for change.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • I was a young kid in the '60s and early '70s.

  • We didn't have varsity sports for women.

  • I was a cheerleader.

  • All I ever wanted to do was get to play.

  • And Title IX brought out the fact,

  • if it's good for young men, why wouldn't it

  • be good for young women?

  • It was a 1972 amendment that guaranteed that there could

  • be no discrimination based on gender by any federally

  • funded institution.

  • I went to Michigan State University

  • and I played basketball and softball there.

  • We didn't have a good space to play

  • we had a leaky roof and warped floors.

  • We didn't have a locker room.

  • At some point, it really hit us in the face

  • that we deserve to be treated just as well as the boys,

  • not better.

  • And we filed a lawsuit.

  • And we won in an hour.

  • In this late '70s, which is when I went to college, well

  • over 90% of all women's sports teams were coached by women.

  • Now it's somewhere closer to 40%.

  • So you could say the decline is drastic.

  • Title IX did exactly what it was supposed to do.

  • It got more girls playing. Title IX asked for participation.

  • It didn’t ask for coaching.

  • We're moving backward in gender equity in coaching.

  • In other fields, they're making advancements.

  • where have all the Women gone?

  • And why are the opportunities going to men?

  • As the opportunities improved,

  • we saw a lot more of the other gender going

  • into our coaching pools.

  • Notre Dame head coach Muffet McGraw

  • is coaching in her ninth Final Four today.

  • When you look at men's basketball

  • and 99% of the jobs go to men, why shouldn't 100% or 99%

  • of the jobs in women's basketball go to women?

  • I'm a big fan

  • I just got to meet her recentlyof Muffet McGraw.

  • Men have the power.

  • Men make the decisions.

  • And when these girls are coming out,

  • who are they looking up to to tell them that that's not

  • the way it has to be?

  • And where better to do that than in sports?

  • I think there is a place for men in our game.

  • All I'm suggesting is that we should

  • have a pretty strong representation of women

  • in leadership positions in everything.

  • [CHEERING, CLAPPING]

  • Go team!

  • You're not going to dream it unless you can see it.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • I started playing professional basketball.

  • I played in the WNBA for the L.A. Sparks and the Phoenix

  • Mercury.

  • And then after that, I decided that I wanted to coach.

  • [INAUDIBLE], are you with me?

  • I heard a lot of no's.

  • I got 10 years of no's, actually.

  • Good, you got pep, you got pep, you got pep.

  • I really want to be a collegiate head coach.

  • I hope that there's an athletic director that

  • has the courage to not see me as a woman,

  • but just see me as a qualified coach.

  • Years ago, when we were looking

  • for a men's basketball coach, and it was mentioned

  • to me by of course one of our administrators

  • and the comment was

  • we're going to get the best one out there.

  • And at the time, Pat Summitt was alive and well.

  • The winningest coach in all of college basketball

  • men or women's.

  • Coached, I believe, eight national championships

  • at Tennessee.

  • And I said, are we going to interview Pat Summitt?

  • And of course, I got a big laugh.

  • Like, that's funny.

  • And I was dead serious.

  • To all the people that think that women

  • can't coach as well as men

  • try me.

  • Go, go, go, go.

  • What we're doing here at the University of Maine, which

  • is really, really special, is empowering these young men

  • to have the confidence to work with strong alpha women.

  • When they go into the workforce,

  • they're going to work with women.

  • We've seen a little bit of the needle moving

  • We've seen some of the women

  • and Major League Baseball has hired some women

  • as hitting coaches.

  • You've seen the NBA

  • Becky Hammon certainly broke that ceiling.

  • We're not there yet. We're still evolving.

  • We're supposed to fit in and walk the walk,

  • but we have to do it in this really particular way

  • That doesn't necessarily ruffle feathers.

  • Double standardsyou see it all the time.

  • If there's a bad call in our game

  • Hey! —

  • and I run out there and I get in the umpire's face,

  • and I run out there and I get in the umpire's face,

  • basically, I'm emotional.

  • Jim Harbaugh is our football coach.

  • Five-yard penalty, [INAUDIBLE].

  • Frustration building for Harbaugh.

  • In a football game, when there's a bad call

  • and Jim Harbaugh gets in that ref's face

  • and throws his headset and people say he's passionate,

  • he's intense, he's just leading his men.

  • Lookie here, lookie here.

  • [INAUDIBLE] Is livid and I don't blame him

  • If you look at male coaches who

  • have been released from their jobs

  • whether it be for not winning, cheating

  • they resurface, they get other jobs.

  • When a woman loses her job, she is branded and marked

  • as no good.

  • Sports are no different from business

  • or politics, tech, you name it.

  • It starts at the top.

  • People hire people who they're comfortable with.

  • Male boards in business hire male C.E.O.'s.

  • And in sports, male athletic directors hire male coaches.

  • And 89% of Division I athletic directors are men.

  • The research shows that diversity leads to success

  • that means hiring only men is leaving titles on the field.

  • The only way change is going to happen

  • is if organizations and institutions hire

  • more women.

  • University presidents should set a target

  • and make it public so that they're held accountable.

  • It's not rocket science.

  • Women are all great enough to play the game.

  • Women are great enough to coach the game.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

[MUSIC PLAYING]

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大学スポーツをコーチングする女性は多くない、その理由はここにある|NYTオピニオン (There Aren't Many Women Coaching College Sports, Here's Why | NYT Opinion)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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