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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Hi, everybody, and welcome to TensorFlow

  • Meets.

  • I'm absolutely delighted to have my colleague Edd Wilder-James

  • here with me today.

  • Now, Edd is Mr. Community and TensorFlow

  • is all about community.

  • So Ed, can you tell us a little bit

  • about what you've been up to?

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Yeah, sure.

  • I have a great job, which is I kind of

  • to reach out to the whole community that's

  • working with in TensorFlow.

  • And one of the most striking things about TensorFlow

  • is obviously so many places it's used in so many areas.

  • And for TensorFlow to continue to be a great project,

  • continue to grow, we need to build it

  • so that the community can easily be part of the thing

  • that we're building because there's so many use cases.

  • You can't just have the core team trying

  • to support them all, right?

  • It needs to be a sustainable community where everyone

  • can help build TensorFlow towards the use cases

  • that they have,

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Mm-hmm and one of the things

  • I find amazing is that we talk about having

  • a dedication to community.

  • But the proof of dedication to community

  • is that we have you full time working on it.

  • It's like your role, right?

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: It is.

  • And it's a tremendously fun job to be

  • able to kind of help the engineering teams out

  • by doing the other part, designing

  • processes and designing the groups in the same way

  • that an API helps you program, right?

  • Some of the structures I help build, help people interact.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: That's a really interesting analogy.

  • I never thought about it that way.

  • That's pretty cool.

  • So now, you did a talk at the TensorFlow developer summit

  • around community.

  • And there was one thing that really jumped out,

  • to me, at that was that you had a subtitle in your slide

  • that was saying, I think it was, we're building TensorFlow

  • together--

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: That's right.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Something along those lines.

  • So can you tell us really what it

  • means for us to be building TensorFlow together

  • with the community?

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Yeah, I think, especially in the last year,

  • there are two things that help us work together

  • as a community.

  • The first of these is that we started

  • to use an RFC request for comments process for design

  • changes.

  • So a year ago, we were at the point

  • where we just kind of landed design changes in code.

  • Or if somebody else wanted to contribute,

  • they just landed in big PR.

  • And there's not a lot of transparency or discussion.

  • But now we've published, I think, over 21 RFCs

  • where new designs for APIs are discussed ahead

  • of time in public.

  • And it's not just the discussion because, afterwards, that

  • accesses documentation.

  • So someone, in the future, can come and understand

  • why we made these choices.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Interesting.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: That's one way we've built together.

  • The second way is that we've established,

  • now, six special interest groups.

  • And these are very defined project groups.

  • So they work on things like new networking protocols or ways

  • to connect TensorFlow to other data sources.

  • And these work together, predominately community

  • led, to build parts of TensorFlow.

  • So now, we've increased the surface area,

  • increased the transparency and the communication.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Wow, great stuff.

  • So one of the things that I always hear with--

  • it's easy to talk about community.

  • It's hard to build community.

  • And one of the things to make building community

  • is to try and make it easy as possible to participate.

  • And I know you've been doing lots and lots

  • of great work in that space.

  • Can you share a little bit about some of the great things

  • that we have that will help people

  • to participate in the community, beyond what you've already

  • shared?

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Oh, well, I'll try.

  • Yeah, there's a lot now.

  • There is a lot more surface area.

  • And it really is about surface area, right?

  • You walk into a big project like TensorFlow, where do you start?

  • Where are the points you can get traction?

  • So we, obviously-- I mentioned that the six that are going on.

  • The modularity of the code base really matters, too.

  • And this is one of things we're doing in TensorFlow 2.0,

  • is making way more modular, having

  • less in this monolithic core.

  • So now, you could find the repo that you want to work on

  • or the developer who's looking after that.

  • It's a lot more accessible.

  • In addition to that in code and the six that I mentioned,

  • we now have a community documentation group,

  • which is gaining steam, people bringing translations on.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: I've seen the translations.

  • Isn't that incredible--

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Yeah, amazing.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: --coming from the community.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Last week, we posted up Korean and Russian

  • translations.

  • And it's fabulous to have first class resources on our website

  • to those communities.

  • And also, finally, the testing group

  • for TensorFlow 2.0, the page [INAUDIBLE] leading,

  • which is really giving people hands on time

  • to bash on TensorFlow 2.0 and help it,

  • make sure it meets all those important use

  • cases that everyone has.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Right, there's much there.

  • Are there any of the community contributions

  • that you've seen that particularly inspire you,

  • that you really like?

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Well, I think what particularly inspires

  • me is the way that all this is coming together

  • to support TensorFlow 2.0.

  • And in many ways, it would not be

  • possible to do 2.0 in the way we're

  • doing without the community.

  • Let me give you an example.

  • All the major design, changes we've consulted the RFC.

  • We now have moved a lot of stuff out of contrib

  • that was existing before and is being maintained

  • by community groups, the six.

  • That wouldn't have been possible before.

  • In addition, the TensorFlow 2.0 testing group,

  • which is also powered by a lot of great Google Developer

  • Experts, is really kind of mashing on the APIs,

  • making sure they work, but also creating

  • examples and notebooks that will demo the functionality.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: One that I particularly

  • like is with TensorFlow data services, the fact

  • that we've being able to have contributions of data sets

  • from the community.

  • And so some of the data sets that have

  • come in-- there was one from Stanford,

  • an undergraduate at Stanford University

  • who contributed like 200,000 chest X-ray images into a data

  • set.

  • And to make that then easy for other people

  • to build training on.

  • It's like, without good community, how could--

  • I find it inspiring.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Yeah, exactly.

  • It's one half about our attitude but also

  • about what we create and structures

  • and also how we code things.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Right, right, so let's switch gears

  • for a second.

  • Now, I know you're hard at work on something

  • called TensorFlow World.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Yeah.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: So it's a great name.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • So could you tell us a little bit about that.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Yeah, well, one

  • of the exciting things about TensorFlow

  • now is that it's so widespread.

  • And what we wanted to do was really

  • create an event that would enable everyone

  • in the ecosystem to come together to share

  • and to talk about what they're doing.

  • Obviously, Google does some great TensorFlow oriented

  • events.

  • But they're limited in capacity.

  • They're quite short.

  • There's a lot of the core TensorFlow

  • team presenting outwards.

  • But there's so many things in the world

  • where TensorFlow is being used that it's

  • really important for us to continue

  • to grow our ecosystem by having everyone come together.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: I see.

  • I see.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Well, let me give you

  • an example about some of the things we'll have in there.

  • So it's not just talks.

  • But there will be tutorials.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: OK.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: There'll be training.

  • There'll be a chance for software vendors who interface

  • with TensorFlow-- out in the real world,

  • people keep all their data in databases and clouds and other

  • places--

  • that we want to tell their story about how

  • they work with TensorFlow, too.

  • So it'll really be something for everybody.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Can I go please?

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Well, let me tell you.

  • Let me tell you a good way that you could go.

  • Obviously, we'd love to have everyone come and attend

  • as an attendee.

  • But right now, we have a call for participation open--

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Right.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: --which is open until April 23.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: OK.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: And you can go to the website

  • URL, which is very excitingly tensorflow.world.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: OK, I think I can remember.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Yeah, right, the clue's in the name.

  • And submit a proposal to talk or deliver a tutorial.

  • And we'll be reviewing those.

  • And by sort of mid-May, we'll have a schedule settled.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: And where and when is TensorFlow World?

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: Right, the conference

  • itself is October 28 through the 31st of October.

  • And that'll be in Santa Clara.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: OK, so and it's got Halloween.

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: It's Halloween and TensorFlow loves orange.

  • So I'm psyched.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Exactly, it'll be great.

  • Are you going to go in fancy dress?

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • Well, thanks so much.

  • Oh, one last question, actually.

  • If people want to learn more about the community,

  • where can they go?

  • EDD WILDER-JAMES: We decided that, again, one URL

  • is the best idea.

  • So if you go to tensorflow.org/community,

  • if you just go to the TensorFlow home page and hit

  • on the community label, you'll get to all our resources.

  • LAURENCE MORONEY: Awesome, awesome, OK, great.

  • Thanks so much.

  • And thanks everybody for watching this episode

  • of TensorFlow Meets.

  • And if you've any questions for Edd,

  • if you've any questions for me, just

  • please leave them in the comments below.

  • And all the links that we discussed today,

  • I'll paste them in there as well.

  • So thanks so much.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

[MUSIC PLAYING]

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A2 初級

持続可能なオープンソースの機械学習プラットフォームを誰もが利用できるように構築する (TensorFlow Meets) (Building a sustainable, open source machine learning platform for everyone (TensorFlow Meets))

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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