Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Can you read in the car?

    車で読書できますか?

  • If so, consider yourself pretty lucky.

    それならあなたはラッキーだと思って下さい。

  • For about one-third of the population, looking at a book while moving along in a car or a boat or train or plane quickly makes them sick to their stomach.

    3 分の 1 の人にとって、車やボート、電車や飛行機で読書をするとすぐに胃腸に不調が現れます。

  • But why do we get motion sickness in the first place?

    そもそもなぜわたしたちは乗り物酔いをするのでしょうか?

  • Well, believe it or not, scientists aren't exactly sure.

    信じようが信じまいが、科学者達さえ正確にはわかっていないのです。

  • The most common theory has to do with mismatched sensory signals.

    最も一般的な理論は感覚信号の不一致との関連です。

  • When you travel in a car, your body is getting two very different messages.

    車で移動している時、あなたの体は 2 つの異なったメッセージを受け取っています。

  • Your eyes are seeing the inside of a vehicle, which doesn't seem to be moving.

    あなたの目は乗り物の中を見ているのに、動いているように見えない。

  • Meanwhile, your ear is actually telling your brain you're accelerating.

    一方で、耳は脳に加速していますと伝えています。

  • Wait, your ear?

    待って、耳?

  • Yeah, your ear actually has another important function besides hearing.

    ええ、実は耳は聞くことに加えて他にも重要な機能を備えています。

  • In its innermost part lies a group of structures known as the vestibular system, which gives us our sense of balance and movement.

    耳の最奥部には前庭系として知られる構造があり、前庭系がバランスや動いている感覚を伝えてくれます。

  • Inside there are three semicircular tubules that can sense rotation, one for each dimension of space.

    内部には回転を感じる 3 つの半円の細管がありそれぞれが各次元を担当しています。

  • And there are also two hair-lined sacks that are filled with fluid.

    また、液体で満たされた毛流れのような袋が 2 つあります。

  • So when you move, the fluid shifts and tickles the hairs, telling your brain whether you are moving horizontally or vertically.

    ですからあなたが動くとその液体は動いて髪を刺激し、あなたの体に水平に、垂直に動いているということを伝えます。

  • With all these combined, your body can sense which direction you're moving in, how much you've accelerated, even at what angle.

    これら全てが組み合わさると、あなたの体はどちらの方向に動いているか、どれくらい加速しているか、どんな角度かということを感じることが出来ます。

  • So, when you are in the car, your vestibular system correctly senses your movement, but your eyes don't see it, especially if they are glued to a book.

    ですから車にいる時前庭系は正しくあなたの動きを感じとっていますが、目は見えていないのです。特に、本に目がいっている時は。

  • The opposite can happen, too.

    逆もあります。

  • Say you are sitting in a movie theater and the camera makes a broad, sweeping move.

    映画館で座っていて、カメラがいっぱいに動いたとしてみましょう。

  • This time, it's your eyes that think you're moving while your ear knows that you're sitting still.

    この時あなたの目は動いていると考えている一方、耳の方はあなたがまだ座ったままとわかっているのです。

  • But why does this conflicting information have to make us feel so terrible?

    しかし、なぜこの矛盾した情報が私達をひどい気分にさせるのでしょうか?

  • Scientists aren't sure about that either, but they think that there's an evolutionary explanation.

    どちらについても科学者は確かではありませんが、彼らは進化論的な説明があるだろうと考えています。

  • You see, both fast moving vehicles and video recordings have only existed in the last couple of centuries, barely a blink in evolutionary time.

    御存知の通り、早く動く乗り物と録画記録は過去 200 年しか存在しておらず、長い進化の過程のわずか一瞬でしかありません。

  • For most of our history, there just wasn't that much that could cause this kind of sensory mix-up.

    歴史の大半では、毒を除いて感覚をごちゃごちゃにするものはそれほど多くはありませんでした。

  • Except for poisons.

    そして毒は生存には最良のものでは無かったため、私達の体はあらゆる体の不調を引き起こすものを取り除くためにとても直線的に、しかし楽しくはない方法で進化してきました。

  • And because poisons are not the best thing for survival, our bodies evolved a very direct but not very pleasant way to get rid of whatever we might have eaten that was causing the confusion.

    この論理はかなり理にかなっているようですが、なぜ女性が男性よりも乗り物酔いの影響を受けやすいのかやなぜ搭乗者が運転者よりももっと吐き気を催すのかなど、説明できない多くのものを残しました。

  • This theory seems pretty reasonable, but it leaves a lot of things unexplained, like why women are more affected by motion sickness than men, or why passengers get more nauseous than drivers.

    他の理論では、その原因はもっと他の体の自然状態の維持を困難にさせる不慣れな状況に関連しているかもしれないと述べています。

  • Another theory suggests that the cause may have more to do with the way some unfamiliar situations make it harder to maintain our natural body posture.

    研究によると水に浸かったり単に姿勢をちょっと変えるだけでかなり乗り物酔いを減らすことがわかっています。

  • Studies have shown that being immersed in water or just changing your stance can greatly reduce the effects of motion sickness.

    しかし、繰り返しになりますが、何が起こっているのか本当にわからないのです。

  • But, again, we don't really know what's going on.

    私達皆は、もっとよく知られた乗り物酔いへの対処法を知っています。

  • We all do know some of the more common remedies for car queasiness

    地平線を見たり、ガムを噛んだり、薬を飲んだりすることです。

  • looking at the horizon, chewing gum, taking over-the-counter pills

    しかしこれらのどれも完全に信頼できるわけでもなく、本当にひどい症状に対処できるわけでもなく、長く退屈な旅よりもずっと高くつくこともあります。

  • but none of these are totally reliable, nor can they handle really intense motion sickness.

    NASA では、宇宙飛行士は一時間ごとに 17000 マイルほど宙に投げ出されるため、乗り物酔いは深刻な問題です。

  • And sometimes, the stakes are far higher than just not being bored during a long car ride.

    ですから、最新の宇宙時代技術を研究することに加えて、NASA はどうすれば宇宙飛行士が慎重に用意された宇宙食を戻してしまうことを防げるかを理解しようと時間をかけています。

  • At NASA, where astronauts are hurled into space at 17,000 miles per hour, motion sickness is a serious problem.

    睡眠の神秘理解や、風邪の治療などとよく似て、乗り物酔いは驚くべき科学的な進歩にも関わらず、どうやら我々がごくわずかしか知らない基本的な問題の1つであるようです。

  • So, in addition to researching the latest space-age technologies, NASA also spends a lot of time trying to figure out how to keep astronauts from vomiting up their carefully prepared space rations.

    ひょっとするといつか乗り物酔いの正確な原因が見つかり、それによって効果的な防ぎ方が見つかるでしょうが、今はまだまだ先のことのようです。

  • Much like understanding the mysteries of sleep or curing the common cold,

  • motion sickness remains one of those seemingly simple problems that, despite amazing scientific progress, we still know very little about.

  • Perhaps one day, the exact cause of motion sickness will be found, and with it, a completely effective way to prevent it.

  • But that day is still on the horizon.

Can you read in the car?

車で読書できますか?

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 TED-Ed 乗り物 酔い 動い 宇宙 進化

TED-ED】乗り物酔いの謎-ローズ・イブレス (【TED-Ed】The mystery of motion sickness - Rose Eveleth)

  • 10067 850
    Go Tutor に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語