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  • [sounds of film crew setting up]

  • Yes, yes, yes.

  • Good, good.

  • O.K.”

  • Yes.”

  • This is Farahnaz Forotan.

  • She’s writing.

  • And then, she’s talking, O.K.?”

  • A young Afghan journalist living in Kabul.

  • Yes.”

  • Yes, yes.

  • This is beautiful.

  • This is beautiful.”

  • I meet her while she’s directing a campaign called

  • The Red Line.

  • She’s pushing women to take a stand,

  • and declare what they refuse to sacrifice

  • if the Taliban regains power

  • before it’s too late.

  • “I was curious what your personal fears are.”

  • I follow Farahnaz from neighborhood to neighborhood

  • as she meets women in their homes or offices,

  • any place theyre willing to talk.

  • Light’s not O.K.”

  • A young woman directing a team of men.

  • Farahnaz isn’t exactly the traditional Afghan woman,

  • but she’s not a total exception either.

  • When the Americans ousted the Taliban in 2001,

  • they triggered a revolution for the country’s women.

  • “O.K., guys.

  • Good morning, class.”

  • Good morning, teacher.”

  • Girls went to school for the first time in years.

  • What do you want to study after English? At university?”

  • “I want to do journalism.”

  • “A journalist?”

  • Yes.”

  • Really?

  • Oh, we should talk.”

  • Since then, millions of women have

  • pursued careers, broken taboos

  • and emerged as a visible force in public life.

  • But all of the progress could be reversed.

  • Now, the Americans are negotiating

  • to leave the country altogether, and bring

  • the Taliban back into the government.

  • At risk?

  • All the hard-won rights women have gained

  • over the last 18 years.

  • So I’m here to ask women

  • if they trust that a deal for peace won’t cost them

  • their freedom.

  • This is Shamila.

  • She’s intimately familiar with the ways of the Taliban,

  • because she’s married to one of its members.

  • He beat her regularly, until she left him.

  • Now, she’s a police officer in Kabul.

  • I want to know what she would do if the Taliban returns

  • to power.

  • Shamila, do you have thoughts of leaving the country?”

  • At work, Shamila regularly handles domestic violence cases.

  • It’s a reminder that this country, despite its changes,

  • remains deeply patriarchal.

  • She’s flooded with calls for help

  • from women who are being beaten and abused.

  • The majority of women here are already

  • treated like second-class citizens.

  • In the current negotiations, the Taliban is promising

  • to protect their rights,

  • but it’s hard to see how, unless their views on women

  • have transformed.

  • I visit Maulvi Qalamuddin, once one of the most feared men

  • in the country.

  • In the ’90s, he headed the Taliban’s religious police.

  • They were responsible for things

  • like flogging women if their burqas were not long enough

  • to cover their ankles, and seizing and destroying

  • people’s televisions.

  • In some ways, he’s changed with the times.

  • But when it comes to women, he refuses

  • to acknowledge how the Taliban abused them

  • in the first place.

  • What was the punishment for a woman going out

  • in public without the hijab?”

  • So you believe that life for women, under the Taliban,

  • in the ’90s was just?”

  • He’s saying that he respects women’s rights,

  • as defined by his version of Islam, which

  • is precisely why it’s hard to trust the Taliban when they

  • promise to protect women.

  • Take Zainab Fayez.

  • She was the only female prosecutor in Kandahar

  • until a few weeks ago, when the Taliban sent her

  • a death threat wrapped around a bullet.

  • She fled.

  • I meet her in Kabul on her way to the attorney general

  • to plead for protection so that she can keep working.

  • Later, we sit down at her relative’s house,

  • where she’s taking refuge.

  • What do you think when you see the Taliban negotiating

  • right now to be part of the government again?”

  • But when I press her on whether she

  • plans to go back to work

  • Do you think youll return to Kandahar?”

  • she ends the interview abruptly.

  • She’s not feeling well.”

  • Yeah.

  • O.K. Yeah.”

  • It is something I see again and again.

  • Even with the Taliban out of the government,

  • some of the most courageous women in the country

  • are afraid to share their full stories.

  • And they have good reason.

  • The truth may cost them their lives.

  • But for other women in Afghanistan,

  • the fight for their rights takes a backseat

  • to their struggle for survival.

  • I traveled to the conservative south near Kandahar,

  • where everyday life is disrupted

  • by constant fighting.

  • Payendu is living in this makeshift camp

  • with her three children.

  • She told me a coalition airstrike destroyed her home

  • after the Taliban forcefully took refuge there.

  • The attack killed her husband

  • and at least four other family members.

  • Women’s rights are a faraway abstraction here.

  • Would you be willing to live under the Taliban again,

  • if it meant peace for your family?

  • What Payendu and others like her want

  • is security, money and more than anything, peace,

  • from whoever can provide it.

[sounds of film crew setting up]

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アフガニスタンの女性がタリバンとの和平交渉を恐れる理由|The Dispatch (Why Afghan Women Fear a Peace Deal with the Taliban | The Dispatch)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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