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  • Hey guys, how's it going?

  • My name is Micaela, and today is a very special day, do you wanna know why?

  • Today is a very special day because eleven years ago today, I came to Japan for the first

  • time.

  • Eleven years!

  • That's like, 40% of my life.

  • Seriously.

  • 40% of my life has been spent in Japan.

  • Ah.

  • Ah.

  • AHH!

  • In a previous video where I talked about "Why I Came To Japan", I talked about how I found

  • it really hard to fit into the Canadian high-school lifestyle, growing up, and it wasn't that

  • I didn't have friends, it was just that I really enjoyed my alone time, and I didn't

  • enjoy going to parties or any of the social activities that a lot of people my age did.

  • And, at the time, like, honestly, my parents were worried, they would use words like "Anti-Social",

  • like, "Oh, you're being anti-social", like it's a bad thing, but only in the past couple

  • of years have I come to terms with the fact that I'm actually just a huge introvert.

  • But you know what?

  • That's totally okay.

  • And when I think about the past 11 years, really, one of the things that has made my

  • life so comfortable here in Japan, was the fact that, I do think it's very easy to live

  • in Japan as an introvert.

  • I find that people generally like to keep to themselves, they don't like to you know,

  • get involved in other people's business, and they're very private people, which, you know,

  • suits people like me, who are also kind of private, and quiet, and withdrawn really well.

  • And while I do think that there are a lot of introverts in Japan, they don't like to

  • put labels on themselves, I think when you label yourself as an introvert, people kind

  • of think that has negative connotations, mostly due to misunderstanding what it actually means

  • to be an introvert.

  • For starters, being an introvert doesn't mean that I'm shy.

  • I'm perfectly capable of being outgoing and bubbly when I'm in my comfort zone, when I'm

  • surrounded by people that I trust, or when I'm in front of a camera, alone in my bedroom.

  • Like, it's not beyond me to be outgoing, to smile, be energetic, I can do that, but, it

  • also means that like a battery, it drains pretty quickly, it needs to be recharged,

  • and I can't be like this all the time every day.

  • Seriously, as soon as I'm done shooting this video, and I turn off this camera, my face

  • will probably go to like....

  • For the rest of the day!

  • The second common misconception about being introverted is that it means that you're a

  • recluse, and you don't like people at all, and I think that is an over exaggeration,

  • because as much as I do love being alone, it doesn't mean that I'm afraid to go out,

  • or that I don't enjoy being out, like I have friends, that I love to hang out with, but

  • I don't seek to expand my social circle beyond that, because I'm comfortable.

  • And in the internet world, being introverted has become such a cliche, because it feels

  • like everybody is an introvert, and there's a good reason for that.

  • It's because for people, like me, and like so many other creators, especially YouTubers,

  • it's a lot easier to sit in your room, in front of a camera, and express yourself, than

  • it is to go and express yourself in front of thousands of people.

  • This is within the comfort zone of an introvert, it's not that strange, really.

  • I don't think that being the life of the party is the end-all goal of humanity, and I think

  • the sooner that people can understand and respect that there are more than one type

  • of person in this world, the happier we'll all be!

  • So, that is my opinion.

  • For as introverted as I say Japan is, it's also very conscious of the fact that it needs

  • to try harder to facilitate social connections and therefore there are times that you might

  • need to just kind of bite your tongue and deal with it within Japanese society.

  • A good example of this is obligatory work parties, or drinking parties with co-workers,

  • and this is done primarily to encourage communication within the company, and to encourage friendships

  • and create a better job.. working environment, and for me, I don't like work parties, and

  • I think a lot of people don't like work parties, but you actually lose a lot more by not going.

  • By not going, you are showing kind of like, a blatant disinterest in helping the company

  • run smoother, and that can be offensive to people around you, and actually have a negative

  • impact on your job.

  • I've cancelled work parties...

  • I've cancelled attending work parties last minute, and I can tell you that I've not benefitted

  • from that ever.

  • I've only disappointed people, and let them down, which sucks, cause I know that their

  • intentions are pure, they want to get to know me, but I deny them that opportunity, by saying

  • I'm sick at the last minute, you need to kind of have to just understand why they exist,

  • in order to feel okay with attending.

  • And if you don't attend you have to realize that by not attending you're taking a risk,

  • potentially hurting people's feelings, or showing disinterest in getting to know everybody

  • and that can have a bad effect, negative effect on your work.

  • Another thing you should keep in mind about Japan, is that, I guess, the foot-in-the-door

  • job, the first job that most expats have in Japan is teaching, and if you are an introvert,

  • you might find teaching in a high-school, or teaching in front of you know, multiple

  • students, very exhausting...

  • So, if you're looking for a job and your visa allows it, perhaps try to work more privately.

  • If you're coming to Japan and you want to teach English, and your visa allows it, what

  • you can do instead of teaching at a high-school or any situation that puts you in front of

  • a large group of people, is to join an Eikaiwa, where they usually have smaller class sizes,

  • or teach privately where you're teaching one on one, and you get to know each student individually.

  • I find that that is a lot easier.

  • Dancing around and entertaining children of course, it is a lot of fun, but I think I

  • could only do it once a day...

  • And, doing multiple back to back lessons of children, and dancing would drain me so badly

  • that I would just go home and like, not talk to anybody.

  • The good news though is that I think being introverted actually comes with a few advantages

  • in Japan, and that is because introverts tend to be more withdrawn, but also very perceptive,

  • and sensitive, to the feelings and environment around them, and I think that that is a really

  • valuable skill to have in Japan, especially when a lot of communication is done...

  • A lot of communication is done very vaguely, and there are a lot of vague expressions and

  • there's a lot of reading between the lines that needs to be done when communicating with

  • Japanese people, especially in a formal environment.

  • If you're interested in knowing more about your personality type, you should take a Myers-Briggs

  • test.

  • These are actually so much fun.

  • I love these tests because I always find they're so accurate.

  • And I think it's important to take it because you realize that there are so many different

  • types of people in this world, so many different strengths and weaknesses, not everybody functions

  • the same way, not everybody handles stress the same way, so taking the test might help

  • you understand yourself a lot better, but it also might help you realize how many different

  • combinations of people are out there in the world.

  • Um, I'll, I can't remember what I am, so I'm going to take the test and I'll put the result

  • in the description, but let me know what you are.

  • Let me know, are you more of an introvert or extrovert?

  • What are your strengths and weaknesses?

  • Let me know in the comments, and I will talk to you again soon.

  • This is Kit, Kit is also an introvert.

  • Kit's hobbies are hiding away in the bedroom, the one cool room in the house, and sleeping

  • all day, cause it's too hot for that noise.

  • Isn't that right?

  • Good boy.

Hey guys, how's it going?

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Being an Introvert in Japan | 日本では内向的な人が多い? (Being an Introvert in Japan | 日本では内向的な人が多い?)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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