Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • This is Takeda-senko,

  • a Kimono dyeing factory run by the Takeda family.

  • Kazuya Takeda has been dyeing kimono for 22 years,

  • like his father and his grandfather before him.

  • Today he’s dyeing four traditional kimono,

  • which start out as patterned rolls of fabric.

  • This process removes impurities.

  • Takeda-san doesn’t make kimono and sell them in a shop.

  • He dyes custom ordered-kimono,

  • which means he has to create the exact color that his customer is looking for.

  • Because those dye colors aren’t pre-manufactured,

  • he mixes the chemicals for them himself.

  • I'm making the chemicals to dye the fabric.

  • There are as many chemicals as there are stars in the sky.

  • I need to pick the right one to get the right color.

  • The dyeing process will take several hours.

  • The first step is perhaps the most challenging

  • creating the correct color dye.

  • Getting the color exactly right requires years of expertise

  • and an artist's intuition.

  • Now that the kimono fabric has been prepared,

  • he transfers it to his dyeing machines.

  • There are two types of machines he uses to dye the kimono,

  • and hell be using both types today.

  • This machine cycles the kimono fabric through a basin filled with dye.

  • Takeda-san makes sure that the kimono stays centered on the wheel

  • by pinning metal rods to the fabric.

  • He adds the dyeing chemicals to the front of the basin,

  • which will slowly work into the fabric during the next few hours.

  • This method is called hitashi-zome, which means boiling dye method.

  • With this machine, the kimono hangs down into a dyeing pot and spins under the water.

  • This, too, will take several hours,

  • but unlike with the other machines,

  • you can see changes immediately with this method.

  • The results are stunning.

  • This will be a beautiful red.

  • While he waits for the dye to sink in,

  • Takeda-san is constantly checking progress on all the kimono

  • and making adjustments to the colors if necessary.

  • If I don't move these rods, the kimono will end up with small lines in the fabric.

  • When the kimono start getting close to the correct color,

  • he dries a spot of fabric on them and compares it to the sample his customer requested.

  • Hmm, I need to figure out what dye to add to get this color correct.

  • Sometimes, the dye requires a bit of altering.

  • Not bad, if I do say so myself.

  • This color is just right.

  • When the dyeing process is finished,

  • he transfers them to another basin that will set the dye and remove any excess chemicals.

  • What do you think?

  • I can't see a difference.

  • I think it's gorgeous, but I guess it's not done yet?

  • Okay!

  • It's not quite there yet.

  • Just needs a little more.

  • This will get rid of the extra dye.

  • After the soaking process,

  • he runs the kimono through a machine to squeeze out the excess water.

  • And finally,

  • he hangs up the kimono to finish drying overnight.

  • After this, theyll be sent to another shokunin to be sewn together into the finished kimono.

  • This is a book of Japanese family crests, which are called kamon.

  • Many families have had their crests passed down through them for generations,

  • but for families who have lost their crest or don’t have one,

  • Takeda-san says it’s perfectly normal to select or create your own.

  • These crests are used in the type of kimono dyeing that his family is known for

  • kuro-montsuki.

  • Kuro-montsuki is a type of formal black kimono

  • with family crests located on the chest and back.

  • The Takeda family uses a method of dyeing the crests that's unique to Nagoya,

  • called Nagoya Kuro-montsuki.

  • In this method they sandwich cut outs of the family crest with wire mesh,

  • which they then sew to the kimono.

  • This allows them to dye around the cut out,

  • the final details are then painted onto the kimono,

  • resulting in the crisp design you see here.

  • The most formal crest kimono has five crests (two on the chest, three on the back).

  • Less formal ones have three or just one crest on the back.

  • The more crests it has, the more formal it becomes.

  • Five crests is the most formal.

  • Men's montsuki (crest kimono) comes with haori jacket.

  • This is the kimono

  • and this is the haori.

  • This is a tie string called haori-himo.

  • When do you normally wear black kimono?

  • For men, you can wear this for funeral ceremonies,

  • or a wedding ceremony.

  • Really, for pretty much any type of ceremony you can wear this.

  • For women,

  • they normally wear a mofuku kimono for funerals.

  • And they wear this type called kuro-tomesode for wedding ceremonies.

  • This cloth will become a kimono.

  • Is this biwa lute?

  • Yes.

  • If you tear out all the seams of kimono, it'll go back to this shape.

  • So you can re-dye it easily, as well.

  • Unlike with other clothes, kimono aren't cut with curves.

  • It's all cut straight.

  • Kimonos also don't show the stitches.

  • This sewing technique is unique to the Japanese kimono.

  • Our mission is to make kimono that you can wear for generations.

  • If you want to dye a kimono black,

  • you can just add some chemicals on it to make it look darker.

  • But some spots might wear off and look white later.

  • So I want to dye black kimono without using those chemicals so it ages well.

  • I have a kuro-montsuki kimono that my grandfather dyed 80 years ago,

  • and it's still beautiful.

  • To dye kimono like him is my goal.

  • What do you think about foreigners who want to wear kimono?

  • That's wonderful.

  • Please do.

  • That's great to hear.

  • I want them all to wear kimono.

  • I really appreciate the foreigners who spread the culture of wearing kimono.

  • Please enjoy kimono.

  • Thank you very much.

  • Thank you so much for everything today.

  • You're welcome. Thank you, too.

  • What's the best part of your job?

  • The best part...

  • Of course I'm happy when our customers like my product,

  • but personally, I love the moment when I get the dye color perfect.

  • It's great.

  • I feel like a genius.

This is Takeda-senko,

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B2 中上級

食いしん坊|着物の染め方 (Shokunin | How to dye kimono)

  • 1 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語