Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Thank you.

    ありがとう。

  • I am honored to be with you today for your commencement from one of the finest universities in the world.

    君たちが世界で最も優秀な大学から巣立つ日に、ここに一緒にいられることを私は光栄に思います。

  • Truth be told I never graduated from college, and this is the closest I've ever gotten to a college graduation.

    実を言うと、私は大学を卒業していません。だから大学卒業に一番近づいたのが実は今日なのです。

  • Today I want to tell you three stories from my life. That's it.

    今日は、私の人生から3つの話をします。それだけです。

  • No big deal. Just three stories.

    大した問題ではありません。たった3つです。

  • The first story is about connecting the dots.

    1つ目の話は、点と点ををつなぐということについてです。

  • I dropped out of Reed College after the first 6 months, but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months or so before I really quit.

    私はリード大学を最初の半年で中退しました。でも、それからドロップイン(正規の学生ではないが、聴講すること)として実際に辞めるまで18か月間いました。

  • So why did I drop out?

    なぜ中退したのか?

  • It started before I was born.

    それは私が生まれる前から始まりました。

  • My biological mother was a young, unwed graduate student, and she decided to put me up for adoption.

    私の生みの親は若くて、未婚の大学院生でした。そして彼女は私を養子に出すことに決めました。

  • She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates, so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife.

    大卒の人に育てられるべきだと彼女は強く感じていました。だから全てにおいて私は生まれてすぐから弁護士とその妻に養子に出される計画でした。

  • Except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute that they really wanted a girl.

    しかし彼らは私が生まれた時、本当は女の子が欲しいと土壇場になって考えていました。

  • So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking: "We got an unexpected baby boy. Do you want him?"

    だから待機リストにいた私の両親は夜中に電話で「予想外ですが、赤ちゃんは男の子です。」と告げられ、「彼を欲しいですか?」と聞かれました。

  • They said: "Of course." My biological mother found out later,

    彼らは、「もちろんです」と言いました。私の生みの親は後に、

  • that my mother had never graduated from college, and that my father had never graduated from high school.

    私の母が大卒ではないし、私の父は高校も卒業していないことを知りました。

  • She refused to sign the final adoption papers.

    彼女は養子の書類の最後に署名するのを拒否しました。

  • She only relented a few months later when my parents promised that I would go to college.

    それから数か月後、私の両親が私を大学に行かせると約束して、私の母は納得しました。

  • This was the start in my life.

    これが私の人生の始まりでした。

  • And 17 years later I did go to college. But I naively chose a college

    そして17年後、私は大学に行きました。しかし、世間知らずにも、

  • that was almost as expensive as Stanford,

    スタンフォードと同じぐらい学費の高いところを選びました。

  • and all of my working-class parents' savings were being spent on my college tuition.

    労働者階級の私の両親は貯金を全て私の学費に費やすことになりました。

  • After six months, I couldn't see the value in it.

    半年後、私はそこに価値が見いだせませんでした。

  • I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life

    私は人生をどうしたいのか全く分かりませんでした。

  • and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out.

    そして大学がどうやってその手助けをしてくれるのかわかりませんでした。

  • And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life.

    私は両親が生涯かけて貯金したお金を全て使い果たしてしまったのです。

  • So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK.

    だから中退して、全て上手くいくだろうと信じることに決めました。

  • It was pretty scary at the time,

    その時はかなり怖かったことを覚えています。

  • but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made.

    でも、振り返ると、それは私がこれまでにした中で最高の決断の1つだったでしょう。

  • The minute I dropped out

    中退した瞬間から、

  • I could stop taking the required classes that didn't interest me,

    興味にない授業を受けなくてよくなったし、

  • and begin dropping in on the ones that looked far more interesting.

    それよりもずっと興味深い授業に参加することができました。

  • It wasn't all romantic. I didn't have a dorm room,

    ロマンティックなことばかりではありませんでした。寮の部屋はなかったので、

  • so I slept on the floor in friends' rooms,

    友人の部屋の床で寝て、

  • I returned coke bottles for the 5 cent deposits to buy food with,

    食べ物を買う5セントのためにコーラのボトルを返却したり、

  • and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night

    毎週日曜日の夜には7マイル歩きました。

  • to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple.

    ハーレクリシュナ寺院で食事をもらうために。

  • I loved it.

    楽しかったです。

  • And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition

    興味や直感に従って出会ってきた全てが

  • turned out to be priceless later on.

    後になってすごく価値のあるものだとわかりました。

  • Let me give you one example: Reed College at that

    1つ例をあげると、リード大学は当時、

  • time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country.

    国内で最高のカリグラフィーの授業をしていただろうと思います。

  • Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer,

    キャンパス内のポスターや机の引き出しの張り紙は

  • was beautifully hand calligraphed.

    手書きの美しい書体で書かれていました。

  • Because I had dropped out and didn't have to take the normal classes,

    中退して、通常の授業を受ける必要がなかったため、

  • I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this.

    カリグラフィーの授業を受けることにしました。

  • I learned about serif and san serif typefaces,

    セリフやサンセリフといった活字体を学びました。

  • about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations,

    異なる文字の組み合わせによってどれぐらいスペースを空けるのか、

  • about what makes great typography great.

    どうやって活字印刷を良いものにするのか。

  • It was beautiful, historical,

    美しくて、歴史があって、

  • artistically subtle in a way that science can't capture,

    科学が捉えられない芸術でした。

  • and I found it fascinating.

    それが私には魅力的でした。

  • None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life.

    これは、当時まだ私の人生で実践的に役立ててはいませんでした。

  • But ten years later,

    しかし10年後、

  • when we were designing the first Macintosh computer,

    初めてのマッキントッシュコンピューターをデザインしていた時、

  • it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac.

    全て私に蘇ってきました。全てをマックに注ぎました。

  • It was the first computer with beautiful typography.

    それは美しい活字のある初めてのコンピューターでした。

  • If I had never dropped in on that single course in college,

    もし私が大学のそのコースを受けていなかったら、

  • the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces

    マックには複数の活字体や

  • or proportionally spaced fonts.

    バランス良くスペースのあるフォントがなかったでしょう。

  • And since Windows just copied the Mac,

    ウィンドウズはマックを真似しただけだから、

  • it's likely that no personal computer would have them.

    コンピューター全てになかったことでしょう。

  • If I had never dropped out,

    もし私が中退していなかったら、

  • I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class,

    このカリグラフィーの授業を受けることはなかったでしょう。

  • and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do.

    そしてコンピューターには今のような素晴らしい活字がなかったでしょう。

  • Of course it was impossible to connect

    もちろん、大学にいたときには、

  • the dots looking forward when I was in college.

    将来を考えて点と点をつなぐことは不可能でした。

  • But it was very, very clear looking backwards ten years later.

    しかし、10年後に振り返ると、それは本当につながるんだとわかります。

  • Again, you can't connect the dots looking forward;

    もう一度言います。未来を見て点をつなぐことはできません。

  • you can only connect them looking backwards.

    振り返ってみると、点をつなぐことができるのです。

  • So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.

    だから将来、点と点がつながるだろうと何とか信じなければなりません。

  • You have to trust in something, your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever.

    何か、直感や運命、人生、カーマなど何でも信じなければなりません。

  • Because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart.

    道で点がつながっていくことを信じることが、心に従う自信になるからです。

  • Even when it leads you off the well worn path, and that will make all the difference.

    月並みな道を外れることになったとしても、それが違いを生み出すでしょう。

  • My second story is about love and loss.

    2つ目の話は愛と喪失についてです。

  • I was lucky I found what I loved to do early in life.

    私は人生の初期に好きなことを見つけられたことは幸運でした。

  • Woz and I started Apple in my parents garage when I was 20.

    ウォズと私は、私が20歳の時に両親の車庫で Apple を開始しました。

  • We worked hard, and in 10 years Apple had grown

    一生懸命働き、10年で Apple は成長しました。

  • from just the two of us in a garage into a $2 billion company with over 4000 employees.

    ガレージで2人だけのスタートから、20億ドルの4000人従業員がいる会社へと。

  • We just released our finest creation the Macintosh

    1年前に、素晴らしい作品であるマッキントッシュを発売開始して、

  • a year earlier, and I just turned 30.

    私は30歳になっていました。

  • And then I got fired.

    そして解雇されたのです。

  • How can you get fired from a company you started?

    自分が初めた会社からどうやって解雇されたのか。

  • Well, as Apple grew we hired someone who I thought

    それは、Apple が成長するにつれて雇った

  • was very talented to run the company with me,

    会社経営をする才能のある人でした。

  • and for the first year or so things went well.

    最初の1年かそこらは、上手くいきました。

  • But then our visions of the future began

    しかし、私たちの将来へのビジョンが異なってきて、

  • to diverge and eventually we had a falling out.

    ついに不和となりました。

  • When we did, our Board of Directors sided with him.

    そうなったとき、取締役会が彼の肩を持ちました。

  • So at 30 I was out. And very publicly out.

    そして私は30歳の時に、解雇されました。世間でも。

  • What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone,

    私が成人期の全て捧げてきたことを全て失ってしまったのです。

  • and it was devastating.

    衝撃的でした。

  • I really didn't know what to do for a few months.

    数か月、本当に何をしたら良いのか分かりませんでした。

  • I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs

    企業家の前の世代を失望させてしまったと感じました。

  • down - that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me.

    私にバトンが渡される前に落としてしまったと。

  • I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce

    そこでデービッド・パッカードとボブ・ノイスに出会いました。

  • and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly.

    そしてそれほど失敗したことを謝ろうとしました。

  • I was a very public failure,

    世間的な落ちこぼれだった。

  • and I even thought about running away from the valley.

    谷から逃げることさえ考えました。

  • But something slowly began to dawn on me. I still loved what I did.

    しかし、少しずつ分かってきたのです。私はまだ自分がしてきたことを愛していると。

  • The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit.

    Apple での事態の変化はそれを少しも変えていませんでした。

  • I had been rejected, but I was still in love.

    拒否されたにもかかわらず、まだ愛していたのです。

  • And so I decided to start over.

    だからやり直すことを決めました。

  • I didn't see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from

    その時はわかりませんでしたが、

  • Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me.

    Apple から解雇されたことは私に起こった最高の出来事だったのです。

  • The heaviness of being successful was

    成功による重圧は

  • replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again,

    また初心者になれるという身軽さ、

  • less sure about everything.

    何事においても不確かであるということに代わりました。

  • It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.

    私の人生の中で最もクリエイティブな期間へと私を解き放ってくれました。

  • During the next five years, I started a company named NeXT,

    5 年の間、NeXT という会社や

  • another company named Pixar,

    Pixar という会社を始めました。

  • and fell in love with an amazing woman who would become my wife.

    そして後に私の妻となる素晴らしい女性に恋をしました。

  • Pixar went on to create the worlds first computer animated feature

    Pixar は世界初のアニメを特徴とした

  • film, Toy Story,

    映画「トイストーリー」を作り出し、

  • and is now the most successful animation studio in the world.

    今や世界で最も成功しているアニメスタジオになりました。

  • In a remarkable turn of events, Apple bought NeXT.

    やがて大きな展開があり、Apple は NeXT を買収しました。

  • And I returned to Apple, and the technology we developed at

    私は Apple に戻り、NeXT で私たちが開発した技術が

  • NeXT is at the heart of Apple's current renaissance.

    Apple の現在の復興の中心となっています。

  • And Laurene and I have a wonderful family together.

    そしてロレーヌと私は素晴らしい家庭を築きました。

  • I'm pretty sure none of this would

    このどれもが、もし私が

  • have happened if I hadn't been fired from Apple.

    Apple から解雇されていなかったら、起こりえませんでした。

  • It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it.

    「良薬は口に苦しだった。

  • Sometimes life's gonna hit you in the head with a brick. Don't lose faith.

    ときに、人生は君の頭をレンガでぶつけてくる。でもその忠誠を忘れないで欲しい。

  • I'm convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved

    私を突き動かしていたのは、私が自分のすることを愛していたからだ。」

  • what I did. You've got to find what you love.

    と自信を持って言えます。君たちも愛することを見つけなければなりません。

  • And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers.

    仕事においても、恋人においても。

  • Your work is going to fill a large part of your life,

    仕事は人生の大部分を占めることになります。

  • and the only way to be truly satisfied

    本当の意味で満足できる唯一の方法は

  • is to do what you believe is great work.

    偉大な仕事だと自分が信じることをすることです。

  • And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.

    そして偉大な仕事をする唯一の方法は、自分のすることを愛することです。

  • If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. And don't settle.

    まだそれが見つかっていないなら、探し続けてください。止めることなく探し続けてください。

  • As with all matters of the heart, you'll know when you find it.

    それを見つけた時、心の底から分かるでしょう。

  • And, like any great relationship,

    あらゆる素晴らしい関係のように

  • it just gets better and better as the years roll on.

    年齢を重ねるにつれて、どんどん良くなっていきます。

  • So keep looking. Don't settle.

    だから探し続けてください。止めないでください。

  • My third story is about death.

    3つ目は死についてです。

  • When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like:

    私が17歳の時、このような名言を見つけました。

  • "If you live each day as if it was your last,

    「毎日それが最後の日だと思って生きたら、

  • someday you'll most certainly be right."

    いつか正しくなるだろう。」

  • It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years,

    それから33年間ずっと影響を与え続けていて、

  • I have looked in the mirror every morning

    毎朝、私は鏡の中の自分を見て

  • and asked myself: "If today were the last day of my life,

    自分自身に問いかけています。「もし今日が人生最後の日だったら、

  • would I want to do what I am about to do today?"

    今日しようとしていることははたして自分のしたいことだろうか」と。

  • And whenever the answer has been "No" for too many days in a row,

    いつでもその答えが「いいえ」というのが何日間も続いたら、

  • I know I need to change something.

    何か変化が必要なのだとわかります。

  • Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important

    もうすぐ自分は死ぬんだと思い出してみることは最も重要なことで、

  • tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life.

    人生において大きな決断をする際の助けになっています。

  • Because almost everything all external expectations, all pride,

    外部の期待やプライド、

  • all fear of embarrassment or failure -

    恥ずかしさや失敗を恐れることなど、

  • these things just fall away in the face of death,

    死というものはほとんど全てのことを剝がして落としていきます。。

  • leaving only what is truly important.

    本当に重要なことだけを残して。

  • Remembering that you are going to die is the best

    死ぬということを覚えておくことは、

  • way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose.

    何か失うものがあると考えてしまう罠を避けるための重要な方法です。

  • You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

    すでになにもないんです。心に従わない理由はない。

  • About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer.

    約1年前、私はガンと診断されました。

  • I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning,

    朝の7時半にスキャンを受けて、

  • and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas.

    膵臓にくっきりとガンがあると診断されました。

  • I didn't even know what a pancreas was.

    私は膵臓が何なのかさえ知らなかった。

  • The doctors told me this was almost

    医者はこの種類のガンは

  • certainly a type of cancer that is incurable,

    ほぼ確実に治らないと言いました。

  • and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months.

    余命3〜6か月だろうと言われました。

  • My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order,

    医者は私に家に帰って身元整理をするように言いました。

  • which is doctor's code for prepare to die.

    医者の言う、死の準備をしろということです。

  • It means to try and tell your kids everything you thought

    それは10年かけて子供に伝えようと思っていたことを

  • you'd have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months.

    たった数か月の間に伝えるということです。