Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Who are we?

    翻訳: Akira Kan 校正: Takahiro Shimpo

  • That is the big question.

    私たちは誰なのか?

  • And essentially we are just an upright-walking, big-brained,

    それが大きな質問です

  • super-intelligent ape.

    根本的には 私たちは直立した 脳が大きい とても聡明なサルです

  • This could be us.

    根本的には 私たちは直立した 脳が大きい とても聡明なサルです

  • We belong to the family called the Hominidae.

    彼も我々の一員です

  • We are the species called Homo sapiens sapiens,

    私たちはヒト科に属している

  • and it's important to remember that,

    ヒト属ホモ・サピエンス(ヒト) と呼ばれる種です

  • in terms of our place in the world today

    大事なのは

  • and our future on planet Earth.

    現世において また 地球の未来を考える上で

  • We are one species

    現世において また 地球の未来を考える上で

  • of about five and a half thousand mammalian species

    我々は

  • that exist on planet Earth today.

    現存する5千5百種類の哺乳類の1種であることです

  • And that's just a tiny fraction of all species

    現存する3500種類の哺乳類の1種であることです

  • that have ever lived on the planet in past times.

    過去に存在した全ての種を考慮すると 本当に小さな存在なのです

  • We're one species out of approximately,

    過去に存在した全ての種を考慮すると 本当に小さな存在なのです

  • or let's say, at least 16 upright-walking apes

    過去 6~8百万年の間に直立歩行するサルが 少なくとも 16種存在しましたが 我々はその1つです

  • that have existed over the past six to eight million years.

    過去 6~8百万年の間に直立歩行するサルが 少なくとも 16種存在しましたが 我々はその1つです

  • But as far as we know, we're the only upright-walking ape

    過去 6~8百万年の間に直立歩行するサルが 少なくとも 16種存在しましたが 我々はその1つです

  • that exists on planet Earth today, except for the bonobos.

    今日ではボノボを例外に ヒトが唯一直立歩行する種です

  • And it's important to remember that,

    今日ではボノボを例外に ヒトが唯一直立歩行する種です

  • because the bonobos are so human,

    大事なのは

  • and they share 99 percent of their genes with us.

    ボノボはとてもヒトに似ていて

  • And we share our origins with a handful of the living great apes.

    99%の遺伝子を我々と共有していることです

  • It's important to remember that we evolved.

    我々の祖先は数少ない現存する大型類人猿と共通です

  • Now, I know that's a dirty word for some people,

    大事なのは進化したことです

  • but we evolved from common ancestors

    聞きたくない人もいるでしょうが

  • with the gorillas, the chimpanzee and also the bonobos.

    私たちはゴリラ チンパンジー ボノボと 共通の祖先から進化したのです

  • We have a common past, and we have a common future.

    私たちはゴリラ チンパンジー ボノボと 共通の祖先から進化したのです

  • And it is important to remember that all of these great apes

    私たちは共通の過去と未来を持っているのです

  • have come on as long and as interesting evolutionary journey

    さらに大事なのは 私たちと同様に 大型類人猿たちも長い進化の旅を歩んできたことです

  • as we ourselves have today.

    さらに大事なのは 私たちと同様に 大型類人猿たちも長い進化の旅を歩んできたことです

  • And it's this journey that is of such interest to humanity,

    さらに大事なのは 私たちと同様に 大型類人猿たちも長い進化の旅を歩んできたことです

  • and it's this journey that has been the focus

    我々ヒトにとっても重要な意味を持つ旅です

  • of the past three generations of my family,

    私の家族にとっては3世代かけて取り組んできた旅です

  • as we've been in East Africa looking for the fossil remains

    私の家族にとっては3世代かけて取り組んできた旅です

  • of our ancestors to try and piece together our evolutionary past.

    ずうっと 東アフリカで祖先の化石採集を続け 進化の過程を組み上げようとしてきたのです

  • And this is how we look for them.

    ずうっと 東アフリカで祖先の化石採集を続け 進化の過程を組み上げようとしてきたのです

  • A group of dedicated young men and women walk very slowly

    化石を探す様子です

  • out across vast areas of Africa,

    献身的な若者が非常にゆっくりとアフリカの大地を歩きながら

  • looking for small fragments of bone, fossil bone, that may be on the surface.

    献身的な若者が非常にゆっくりとアフリカの大地を歩きながら

  • And that's an example of what we may do as we walk across

    地上に顔をのぞかせる小さな化石になった骨の破片を探します

  • the landscape in Northern Kenya, looking for fossils.

    これはケニア北部で化石を探している様子です

  • I doubt many of you in the audience can see

    これはケニア北部で化石を探している様子です

  • the fossil that's in this picture,

    この写真の中に化石が映っているのですがお分かりですか?

  • but if you look very carefully, there is a jaw, a lower jaw,

    この写真の中に化石が映っているのですがお分かりですか?

  • of a 4.1-million-year-old upright-walking ape

    とても気をつけて見ると ここに顎があります 下顎です

  • as it was found at Lake Turkana on the west side.

    410万年前の直立猿人で

  • (Laughter)

    トゥルカナ湖西岸で発見されたとおりです

  • It's extremely time-consuming, labor-intensive

    (笑)

  • and it is something that is going to involve a lot more people,

    とても時間も労力も掛かります

  • to begin to piece together our past.

    過去を組み上げる仕事は本当にたくさんの人を要します

  • We still really haven't got a very complete picture of it.

    過去を組み上げる仕事は本当にたくさんの人を要します

  • When we find a fossil, we mark it.

    まだその全容は明らかにされていません

  • Today, we've got great technology: we have GPS.

    化石を発見すると記録を取ります

  • We mark it with a GPS fix,

    今日では GPS技術を活用します

  • and we also take a digital photograph of the specimen,

    GPSで地理情報を確定します

  • so we could essentially put it back on the surface,

    次に標本のデジタル写真を撮ります

  • exactly where we found it.

    そうすれば発見した地表に戻すことができます

  • And we can bring all this information into big GIS packages, today.

    そうすれば発見した地表に戻すことができます

  • When we then find something very important,

    これらの情報はすべて GIS に収納することができます

  • like the bones of a human ancestor,

    人類の祖先の骨のように とても重要なものを発見した時は

  • we begin to excavate it extremely carefully and slowly,

    人類の祖先の骨のように とても重要なものを発見した時は

  • using dental picks and fine paintbrushes.

    歯科医用ピックと絵ブラシを使って 極めて慎重にゆっくりと発掘します

  • And all the sediment is then put through these screens,

    歯科医用ピックと絵ブラシを使って 極めて慎重にゆっくりと発掘します

  • and where we go again through it very carefully,

    沈殿物はふるいにかけて さらに吟味します

  • looking for small bone fragments, and it's then washed.

    沈殿物はふるいにかけて さらに吟味します

  • And these things are so exciting. They are so often the only,

    小さな骨のかけらを探し 見つかると洗います

  • or the very first time that anybody has ever seen the remains.

    何か見つけた瞬間は格別です  めったに見つけられる物ではありません

  • And here's a very special moment, when my mother and myself

    何か見つけた瞬間は格別です  めったに見つけられる物ではありません

  • were digging up some remains of human ancestors.

    私と母親が人類の祖先の痕跡を 発掘している とても特別な瞬間です

  • And it is one of the most special things

    私と母親が人類の祖先の痕跡を 発掘している とても特別な瞬間です

  • to ever do with your mother.

    母親と一緒に過ごす時間としては 本当に特別です

  • (Laughter)

    母親と一緒に過ごす時間としては 本当に特別です

  • Not many people can say that.

    (笑)

  • But now, let me take you back to Africa, two million years ago.

    これを体験する方はそう多くないでしょうね

  • I'd just like to point out, if you look at the map of Africa,

    では2百万年前のアフリカを見てみましょう

  • it does actually look like a hominid skull in its shape.

    アフリカ大陸を見てみると 本当に ヒトの頭蓋骨のような形をしていますね

  • Now we're going to go to the East African and the Rift Valley.

    アフリカ大陸を見てみると 本当に ヒトの頭蓋骨のような形をしていますね

  • It essentially runs up from the Gulf of Aden,

    アフリカ東部にある地溝帯です

  • or runs down to Lake Malawi.

    アデン湾からマラウイ湖まで至っています

  • And the Rift Valley is a depression.

    アデン湾からマラウイ湖まで至っています

  • It's a basin, and rivers flow down from the highlands into the basin,

    地溝帯は低地帯でその盆地に 向かって川が流れこんでいます

  • carrying sediment, preserving the bones of animals that lived there.

    地溝帯は低地帯でその盆地に 向かって川が流れこんでいます

  • If you want to become a fossil, you actually need to die somewhere

    ここに住んでいた動物の骨が 沈殿物と一緒に保存されています

  • where your bones will be rapidly buried.

    もしあなたが化石になりたかったら  骨がすぐに埋まってくれる場所で死ぬことです

  • You then hope that the earth moves in such a way

    もしあなたが化石になりたかったら  骨がすぐに埋まってくれる場所で死ぬことです

  • as to bring the bones back up to the surface.

    その後は地層の動きに委ねて地表に 骨が浮かび上がるのを祈りましょう

  • And then you hope that one of us lot

    その後は地層の動きに委ねて地表に 骨が浮かび上がるのを祈りましょう

  • will walk around and find small pieces of you.

    あとは待ってればいいだけ 簡単でしょ?

  • (Laughter)

    私たちの誰かが化石になった 皆さんを見つけ出します

  • OK, so it is absolutely surprising that we know as much

    (笑)

  • as we do know today about our ancestors,

    私たちが今日祖先について持っている知識は 収集がいかに困難か考えると驚くほど豊富です

  • because it's incredibly difficult,

    私たちが今日祖先について持っている知識は 収集がいかに困難か考えると驚くほど豊富です

  • A, for these things to become -- to be -- preserved,

    私たちが今日祖先について持っている知識は 収集がいかに困難か考えると驚くほど豊富です

  • and secondly, for them to have been brought back up to the surface.

    標本が保存され そして地表に現れる 確率は非常に低いです

  • And we really have only spent 50 years looking for these remains,

    標本が保存され そして地表に現れる 確率は非常に低いです

  • and begin to actually piece together our evolutionary story.

    標本採集に費やした時間と 進化の物語を組み立て始めてから

  • So, let's go to Lake Turkana, which is one such lake basin

    わずかに50年です

  • in the very north of our country, Kenya.

    トゥルカナ湖に行ってみましょう ケニア最北部に位置する盆地にある湖です

  • And if you look north here, there's a big river that flows into the lake

    トゥルカナ湖に行ってみましょう ケニア最北部に位置する盆地にある湖です

  • that's been carrying sediment and preserving the remains

    湖には北から流れ込む大きな川があります

  • of the animals that lived there.

    川はかつて生息した動物の化石と沈殿物を運んできます

  • Fossil sites run up and down both lengths of that lake basin,

    川はかつて生息した動物の化石と沈殿物を運んできます

  • which represents some 20,000 square miles.

    化石発掘現場は湖のあちらこちらにあります

  • That's a huge job that we've got on our hands.

    地域の面積は 約5万平方キロあります

  • Two million years ago at Lake Turkana,

    発掘するには広大な土地です

  • Homo erectus, one of our human ancestors,

    2百万年前トゥルカナ湖の一帯には

  • actually lived in this region.

    人類の祖先のひとつホモ・エレクトスが 暮らしていました

  • You can see some of the major fossil sites that we've been working

    人類の祖先のひとつホモ・エレクトスが 暮らしていました

  • in the north. But, essentially, two million years ago,

    北側に私たちが発掘した主要な化石採取地点が見えます

  • Homo erectus, up in the far right corner,

    北側に私たちが発掘した主要な化石採取地点が見えます

  • lived alongside three other species of human ancestor.

    2百万年前に右上のホモ・エレクトスは 他に3種あった人類の祖先と共に暮らしていました

  • And here is a skull of a Homo erectus,

    2百万年前に右上のホモ・エレクトスは 他に3種あった人類の祖先と共に暮らしていました

  • which I just pulled off the shelf there.

    ホモ・エレクトスの頭蓋骨です

  • (Laughter)

    そこの棚から拝借してきました

  • But it is not to say that being a single species on planet Earth is the norm.

    (笑)

  • In fact, if you go back in time,

    地球上でひとつの種しかいないのは稀なことです

  • it is the norm that there are multiple species of hominids

    時間を遡ると

  • or of human ancestors that coexist at any one time.

    人類の祖先であるヒト属に複数の種が 同時期に共存していたのは普通のことでした

  • Where did these things come from?

    人類の祖先であるヒト属に複数の種が 同時期に共存していたのは普通のことでした

  • That's what we're still trying to find answers to,

    いったい何処から現れたのでしょう?

  • and it is important to realize that there is diversity

    未だにその答えは見つかっていません

  • in all different species, and our ancestors are no exception.

    大事なことは全ての種には多様性があり 私たちの祖先も例外ではなかったことです

  • Here's some reconstructions of some of the fossils

    大事なことは全ての種には多様性があり 私たちの祖先も例外ではなかったことです

  • that have been found from Lake Turkana.

    これはトゥルカナ湖で発見した化石から 当時の姿を再現したものです

  • But I was very lucky to have been brought up in Kenya,

    これはトゥルカナ湖で発見した化石から 当時の姿を再現したものです

  • essentially accompanying my parents to Lake Turkana

    ケニアで育ったのは私にとっては幸運でした

  • in search of human remains.

    トゥルカナ湖に人類の形跡を求めて 両親に連れられてきました

  • And we were able to dig up, when we got old enough,

    トゥルカナ湖に人類の形跡を求めて 両親に連れられてきました

  • fossils such as this, a slender-snouted crocodile.

    大きくなる頃には一緒に発掘をしていました

  • And we dug up giant tortoises, and elephants and things like that.

    例えばこの細鼻ワニの化石や

  • But when I was 12, as I was in this picture,

    オオガメやゾウ等を発掘しました

  • a very exciting expedition was in place on the west side,

    この写真は私が 12歳の時ですが

  • when they found essentially the skeleton of this Homo erectus.

    西岸でとても画期的な発掘調査が進行中でした

  • I could relate to this Homo erectus skeleton very well,

    ホモ・エレクトス全容の骨格が発見されたのです

  • because I was the same age that he was when he died.

    このホモ・エレクトスには親近感を覚えました

  • And I imagined him to be tall, dark-skinned.

    死んだ時の年齢が当時の私と同じだったからです

  • His brothers certainly were able to run long distances

    背は高く色黒の肌をしていたことでしょう

  • chasing prey, probably sweating heavily as they did so.

    兄弟たちはきっと長い距離を走っては

  • He was very able to use stones effectively as tools.

    汗を大量にかきながら獲物を追ったことでしょう

  • And this individual himself, this one that I'm holding up here,

    石を道具として使いこなせました

  • actually had a bad back. He'd probably had an injury as a child.

    いま手に持っている個体は実は背中に障害を抱えていました

  • He had a scoliosis and therefore must have been looked after

    子供の時に怪我したのだと思います

  • quite carefully by other female, and probably much smaller,

    側弯症を患い家族や女性たちの介護を受けたと思います

  • members of his family group, to have got to where he did in life, age 12.

    側弯症を患い家族や女性たちの介護を受けたと思います

  • Unfortunately for him, he fell into a swamp

    そのおかげで12歳まで生きたと推定します

  • and couldn't get out.

    不幸にも湿地帯に捕まって 抜け出せなくなりました

  • Essentially, his bones were rapidly buried

    不幸にも湿地帯に捕まって 抜け出せなくなりました

  • and beautifully preserved.

    そのため急速に骨が埋められ きれいに保存されたのです

  • And he remained there until 1.6 million years later,

    そのため急速に骨が埋められ きれいに保存されたのです

  • when this very famous fossil hunter, Kamoya Kimeu,

    そのまま 160万年が過ぎた後に

  • walked along a small hillside

    とても有名な化石ハンター カモヤ・キメユが

  • and found that small piece of his skull lying on the surface

    ある山肌を歩いている時に

  • amongst the pebbles, recognized it as being hominid.

    頭蓋骨の小さな破片を発見したのです

  • It's actually this little piece up here on the top.

    それは小石の間に紛れていたのですが ヒトの化石と分かりました

  • Well, an excavation was begun immediately,

    頭の頂点のこの部分にあたります

  • and more and more little bits of skull

    発掘がすぐに始まりました

  • started to be extracted from the sediment.

    堆積物の中から徐々に小さな 頭蓋骨の破片が発掘されました

  • And what was so fun about it was this:

    堆積物の中から徐々に小さな 頭蓋骨の破片が発掘されました

  • the skull pieces got closer and closer to the roots of the tree,

    面白いことに

  • and fairly recently the tree had grown up,

    頭蓋骨部分は木の根に接近しており

  • but it had found that the skull had captured nice water in the hillside,

    かなり最近ですが木が大きくなるに連れて

  • and so it had decided to grow its roots in and around this,

    根が頭蓋骨に溜まった水を吸うように 周りに絡みあったために

  • holding it in place and preventing it from washing away down the slope.

    骨が斜面から流れ落ちることなく まとまった形で残ったのです

  • We began to find limb bones; we found finger bones,

    骨が斜面から流れ落ちることなく まとまった形で残ったのです

  • the bones of the pelvis, vertebrae, ribs, the collar bones,

    手足や指の骨 骨盤 背骨  あばら骨や鎖骨も見つかりました

  • things that had never, ever been seen before in Homo erectus.

    手足や指の骨 骨盤 背骨  あばら骨や鎖骨も見つかりました

  • It was truly exciting.

    ホモ・エレクトスとしては初めてのことです

  • He had a body very similar to our own,

    本当に画期的でした

  • and he was on the threshold of becoming human.

    骨格は私たちと とても似ています

  • Well, shortly afterwards, members of his species

    ほとんど人間に成り掛けていました

  • started to move northwards out of Africa,

    この後少し経つと この種は 北に向けてアフリカを旅立ちました

  • and you start to see fossils of Homo erectus

    この後少し経つと この種は 北に向けてアフリカを旅立ちました

  • in Georgia, China and also in parts of Indonesia.

    そのためホモ・エレクトスの化石が グルジア 中国 インドネシアの一部で発見されたのです

  • So, Homo erectus was the first human ancestor to leave Africa

    そのためホモ・エレクトスの化石が グルジア 中国 インドネシアの一部で発見されたのです

  • and begin its spread across the globe.

    ホモ・エレクトスは人類の祖先として初めてアフリカを離れ

  • Some exciting finds, again, as I mentioned,

    世界中に広がりました

  • from Dmanisi, in the Republic of Georgia.

    グルジア共和国 ドマニシ で 発見された画期的な化石です

  • But also, surprising finds

    グルジア共和国 ドマニシ で 発見された画期的な化石です

  • recently announced from the Island of Flores in Indonesia,

    最近ではインドネシア フロレス島でも 同様な発見がありました

  • where a group of these human ancestors have been isolated,

    最近ではインドネシア フロレス島でも 同様な発見がありました

  • and have become dwarfed, and they're only about a meter in height.

    この祖先は他の祖先から隔離されるうちに 小人化し身長は1m程にしかなりません

  • But they lived only 18,000 years ago,

    この祖先は他の祖先から隔離されるうちに 小人化し身長は1m程にしかなりません

  • and that is truly extraordinary to think about.

    わずか 1万8千年前には生きていたのです

  • Just to put this in terms of generations,

    本当に驚くべきことなのです

  • because people do find it hard to think of time,

    私たちは時間で考えるのが苦手ですから 世代数に置き換えてみましょう

  • Homo erectus left Africa 90,000 generations ago.

    私たちは時間で考えるのが苦手ですから 世代数に置き換えてみましょう

  • We evolved essentially from an African stock.

    ホモ・エレクトスがアフリカを後にしたのは 9万世代前のことです

  • Again, at about 200,000 years as a fully-fledged us.

    私たちはアフリカの家系から進化しました

  • And we only left Africa about 70,000 years ago.

    ヒトに進化を遂げたのは 20万年前

  • And until 30,000 years ago, at least three upright-walking apes

    アフリカを後にしたのはわずか 7万年前のことです

  • shared the planet Earth.

    そして 3万年前までは少なくとも 直立猿人が3種共存していたのです

  • The question now is, well, who are we?

    そして 3万年前までは少なくとも 直立猿人が3種共存していたのです

  • We're certainly a polluting, wasteful, aggressive species,

    そこで今の私たちは誰か という質問に辿り着きます

  • with a few nice things thrown in, perhaps.

    私たちは間違いなく環境を汚す浪費好きで好戦的な種です

  • (Laughter)

    良い面も少しはあるでしょうが

  • For the most part, we're not particularly pleasant at all.

    (笑)

  • We have a much larger brain than our ape ancestors.

    大部分は特に見て楽しいものではありません

  • Is this a good evolutionary adaptation, or is it going to lead us

    祖先のサルよりはかなり大きな脳を持っています

  • to being the shortest-lived hominid species on planet Earth?

    これは進化的に優れた適合だったのでしょうか それとも 史上最も短命の種となる要因なのでしょうか?

  • And what is it that really makes us us?

    これは進化的に優れた適合だったのでしょうか それとも 史上最も短命の種となる要因なのでしょうか?

  • I think it's our collective intelligence.

    ヒトをヒトと成すものは何なんでしょう?

  • It's our ability to write things down,

    私は知性の集合だと思います

  • our language and our consciousness.

    我々の書く能力

  • From very primitive beginnings, with a very crude tool kit of stones,

    言語や感情等です

  • we now have a very advanced tool kit, and our tool use

    幼稚な石器と共に とても原始的な始まりから

  • has really reached unprecedented levels:

    非常に多彩な道具を使いこなすようになり 私たちの道具は類をみないほどに進歩しました

  • we've got buggies to Mars; we've mapped the human genome;

    非常に多彩な道具を使いこなすようになり 私たちの道具は類をみないほどに進歩しました

  • and recently even created synthetic life, thanks to Craig Venter.

    火星に探査機を送り込み ヒトの遺伝子構造を解析しました

  • And we've also managed to communicate with people

    クレイグ・ヴェンター博士のおかげで 合成生命さえ作りました

  • all over the world, from extraordinary places.

    また世界中のいかなる場所にいても お互い会話することができます

  • Even from within an excavation in northern Kenya,

    また世界中のいかなる場所にいても お互い会話することができます

  • we can talk to people about what we're doing.

    ケニア北部の発掘現場からでも 状況を報告することができます

  • As Al Gore so clearly has reminded us,

    ケニア北部の発掘現場からでも 状況を報告することができます

  • we have reached extraordinary numbers

    アル・ゴアが明らかに指摘するように

  • of people on this planet.

    地球上の人口は飛躍的な増加を遂げました

  • Human ancestors really only survive on planet Earth,

    地球上の人口は飛躍的な増加を遂げました

  • if you look at the fossil record,

    化石から分かることは人類の祖先は 平均で見ると1種あたり100万年生存しています

  • for about, on average, a million years at a time.

    化石から分かることは人類の祖先は 平均で見ると1種あたり100万年生存しています

  • We've only been around for the past 200,000 years as a species,

    化石から分かることは人類の祖先は 平均で見ると1種あたり100万年生存しています

  • yet we've reached a population of more than six and a half billion people.

    私たちは種としては 20万年しか存在していません

  • And last year, our population grew by 80 million.

    それなのに人口は 65億に達しました

  • I mean, these are extraordinary numbers.

    昨年一年間で人口は 8千万人増加しました

  • You can see here, again, taken from Al Gore's book.

    とてつもない数字です

  • But what's happened is our technology

    アル・ゴアの本に戻ってみます

  • has removed the checks and balances on our population growth.

    何が起きたかと言うと私たちの技術が

  • We have to control our numbers, and I think this is as important

    人口増加について抑制と均衡を解いてしまったのです

  • as anything else that's being done in the world today.

    私たちは人口を制御しないといけません 今日の世界での最重要課題のひとつと言えます

  • But we have to control our numbers,

    私たちは人口を制御しないといけません 今日の世界で最重要課題のひとつと言えます

  • because we can't really hold it together as a species.

    人口抑制が必要なのは種として これ以上存続するのが困難だからです

  • My father so appropriately put it,

    人口抑制が必要なのは種として これ以上存続するのが困難だからです

  • that "We are certainly the only animal that makes conscious choices

    父親が いみじくも言うのは

  • that are bad for our survival as a species."

    “我々は種の生存に関しては 明らかに 意識的に誤った選択をする唯一の動物だ”

  • Can we hold it together?

    “我々は種の生存に関しては 明らかに 意識的に誤った選択をする唯一の動物だ”

  • It's important to remember that we all evolved in Africa.

    我々に将来はあるのでしょうか?

  • We all have an African origin.

    大事なのは私たちはすべてアフリカから進化したことです

  • We have a common past and we share a common future.

    みんなアフリカが起源なのです

  • Evolutionarily speaking